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  1. #1
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    NAS recommendations?

    I'm looking for a NAS to run Squeezecenter on, and to store all my music (of course) and digital photos on.

    I'd like some recommendations on what to choose. Netgear's ReadyNAS boxes look interesting because of their good reputation and Logitech's native support.

    I've been looking at ReadyNAS Duo and NV+ for a long time, but am wondering if I should get one with a more up to date hardware, like ReadyNAS Ultra 2, Ultra 4 or maybe even Ultra 2+ or Ultra 4+ with their dual core processors.

    So: I was hoping that someone with experience with these products might chime in.

    Will the (old, but cheap) ReadyNAS Duo handle streaming hi-rez music to my Squeezebox Touch at the same time as I'm editing digital images on the disks, or even just reading/writing data from/to it?

    How about an Ultra 2, with it's Atom CPU? ...Or should I play it safe and buy an Ultra 2+/4+ which has a dual core Atom CPU? I really would like to keep the cost down, but don't want to skimp on quality either.

    Regarding the number of disk slots: I want some extra security and redundancy compared to standalone disk drives. I know the two disk boxes can run in Raid 1, and the 4 disk ones support raid 5 and 6 in addition to that. How much safer will my data be on a NAS with four disks compared to one with only two?

    I'd also appreciate recommendations on products from other manufacturers if they're a better choice. I want something that's durable, fast enough and secure enough, as cheap as possible.

    Please share your thoughts, experience and recommendations.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazed View Post
    I'm looking for a NAS to run Squeezecenter on, and to store all my music (of course) and digital photos on.
    My experiences with NAS devices were not good ones.I tried a Qnap TS-101 and later changed to a TS-109. I was hoping they would be an easy option, but in reality, getting them to work properly just seemed to be hassle after hassle.

    In the end I just got myself a Barebones Tranquil PC, inserted 1 GB of RAM and a 1Tb Western Digital Green Hard drive, and installed a Lunix operating system. The price was similar to the price of a NAS, but it runs much faster, and was actually less hassle to get up and running. You can also consider a mini ITX box but it's a bit more work figuring out all the different components you need and how to put them together.

    I originally used Vortexbox, on my Tranquil PX, as it is very easy to install. I'd recommend it as a good method for beginners. It was *VERY* easy to install, and worked pretty much straight away.

    These days however I'm using Ubuntu 10.04, with a Gnome desktop installed. It takes a lot more setting up, but you can do a lot more with it if you are prepared to learn how to use it. I've now even got a mythTV back end running on it, in addition to my Squeeebox server. I'd recommend Ubuntu to more advanced users.

    Richard.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardEvans View Post

    I originally used Vortexbox, on my Tranquil PX, as it is very easy to install. I'd recommend it as a good method for beginners. It was *VERY* easy to install, and worked pretty much straight away.

    These days however I'm using Ubuntu 10.04, with a Gnome desktop installed. It takes a lot more setting up, but you can do a lot more with it if you are prepared to learn how to use it. I've now even got a mythTV back end running on it, in addition to my Squeeebox server. I'd recommend Ubuntu to more advanced users.

    Richard.
    VortexBox runs Fedora 14 Linux, so everything you can do with Ubuntu you should also be able to do on a VortexBox. You'll have to install X11 and the Gnome desktop yourself, since they are not installed by default. A number of VortexBox users have done this.

    Both Ubuntu and Fedora are good choices for a media server platform; pick your favorite flavor.

  4. #4
    Senior Member agillis's Avatar
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    A ReadyNAS will stream OK but the web interface will be very slow. Also you won't be able to run most plug-ins, or play WMA streams. Your better off getting a PC based NAS like a VortexBox appliance. That way you can use SqueezeBox server to it's full extent and get CD/DVD ripping for free.

    As for RAID the more drives you have the LESS safe your data is because you have a higher chance of drive failure. So 1 drive is the safest.

    You will need a good backup solution such as a USB drive that you disconnect from your system and put in a safe place after the backup is complete.
    rip, tag, get cover artů All you do is insert the CD!
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    agillis
    Lead Developer VortexBox

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sakkerju's Avatar
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    My vote goes to the Synology DiskStations / NAS.
    'Turnkey' package support for their models is OK, and in most other cases SSODS installation works fine.

    Great NAS with loads of features...the latest x11 versions have choice between Intel or ARM architecture.
    http://forum.synology.com/wiki/index...es_my_NAS_have
    Last edited by Sakkerju; 2011-03-19 at 01:25.
    Squeezebox Server 7.9.1 (Pinkdot build) *** Squeezebox family: 3x Radio (Black-White-Red) / 2x Touch / 2x Controller / Android App / SqueezePlay *** AKG K240-DF headphone
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  6. #6
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    I just got a Qnap 459P+. It was quite pricey compared to the old linux box I was using. But in the context of the stereo it was a bargain.

    Everything you want from a file server and media server just works out of the box.

    I had a QNap 219 briefly before which worked but was just too slow

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mnyb's Avatar
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    Whatever you get make sure it has x86 cpu like atom dual atom or similar offerings from amd or via.

    the DUO is known to be slow for example, web-ui would be slugish. Logitechs own implementation of the server on an arm cpu onboard the Touch has web-UI and some other things turned off for performance reasons.

    There is also other issues with arm cpu or similar many of binaries resposible for transcoding functions does exist for all cpu's and if this is the case it is usually because it would not have the power to run them.
    transcoding is good 24/96 files transcoded to 24/48 for boom or SB3 , AAC radio streams transcoded to flac so that they work on older squeezeboxes etc.

    On non x86 cpu's and low memory systems the linux that runs on the nas has been tweaked a lot to make it work . there can aslo be tweaks aplied to the squeezeboxserver version suplied by some nas vendors wich make upgrading or downgrading on your own hard to do. Ready NAS build are maintanied by logitech, but not other NAS versions, these user often have to wait untill the NAS vendor or a single persson responsible for that build tweaks the new version so that they too can upgrade.

    there is probably other issues I've forgot.

    Running x86 cpu AND an OS as close to a normal Linux distro as possible is the key to a reliable server imho.

    Another issue with some high performance nas boxes ( besides that they are expensive) is that not all of them are quiet some have fan noise just the same as a small PC.

    On to the topic.

    Getting the dual atom is probably wise if you are going the work on or transfer large files while you are listening to your server.

    also raid is not backup it protects you from downtime so it saves time.
    you still need an usb drive to backup the NAS this drive should normally not be conected to a computer or the electrical grid, you plug it in when you do a backup then unplug it.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mnyb View Post
    Another issue with some high performance nas boxes ( besides that they are expensive) is that not all of them are quiet some have fan noise just the same as a small PC.
    My readynas DUO is as loud or louder than my Vortexbox Appliance.

  9. #9
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    Mar 2011
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    What about one of these http://www.scan.co.uk/products/shutt...-optical-drive add a hard drive, 1gb ram optical drive and vortexbox software. It has no fan and will be much more powerful than a NAS.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Feb 2006
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    The only time my QNAP419 fan has come on so far is when I copied 1TB of music on to it.

    It is summer here and regularly over 30degC in the house no complaints so far.

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