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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    18

    WEP Connection problem

    Greetings.

    I've searched, and if I've failed to find a posted solution, please forgive.

    I've been using an SB classic without problem, wirelessly and passwordlessly connected for 9 months.

    Today my internet was upgraded by my service provider. I don't really understand the details of it. Just that it's now a WEP network, and password protected.

    Well, the 13 character password that gets me on my network isn't accepted by the SB.

    Re configuring the network settings on the SB, it gives me a choice of 64 or 128 bit WEP...whatever.

    The 64 bit option has too few spaces for my password, the 128 too many.

    I tried to reconfigure my computer to just not have a password. Can't do it.

    Stuck.

    I have no idea whatsoever, now, what to do.

    Recommendations most eagerly appreciated.

    Oh, might help to note that I"m using a mac power book. FWIW.
    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Question

    WiFi terminology has been inherited from the standards side with no attempt to make it more accessible ...

    Diagnosis at a distance is difficult but here goes...

    1. If your internet access has been upgraded this should have no affect on your WiFi set up. WiFi is purely internal to your network so unless they changed the settings on your wireless base-station (or router, or access point, or whatever you are used to calling it) nothing should have changed. So, the first question is: what exactly did they "upgrade". Did they mess around with your WiFi wireless settings?

    2. WEP is an old deprecated standard. No one who knew what they were doing (and here I mean the service provider who should not have left you wondering how to deal with the "upgrade") would "upgrade" to this. The current domestic standard is WPA, normally (in the UK at least) WPA with TKIP or WPA2 Personal for domestic use. If you have been given a password that is not a hexadecimal number (using the characters 0 - 9 and A -F [or a - f] only) - in other words just a normal password then you have a WPA set up.

    If you can check on or confirm the above that will help with what we suggest next.
    Last edited by dBerriff; 2009-09-06 at 02:37. Reason: remove ambiguity
    Clients: SB3, Boom. Server: work in progress, but PC Win. XP/SqueezeCenter (or whatever it is called this month) for now. Replay: AVI ADM9.1 Active Speakers. Personal: the technology is the means, the music is the end.

  3. #3
    Slim Devices Developer fcm4711's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    886
    Hi there

    I think it's sad that a provider "upgrades" a customers router to use WEP as wireless encryption, because WEP is close to useless. The only wireless encryption standard right now that is not yet cracked it WPA2. Some even claim they can crack WPA within minutes.

    But I guess you probably aren't looking for a lecture about wireless security but for a solution. I think you need to convert the ASCII WEP key to a HEX key. This should give you 26 HEX numbers from your 13 ASCII characters.

    Try a WEP key converter like this one:

    http://www.dirtymonday.net/key_convert.html

    Hope this helps
    Felix
    Programming is the art of cleverly arranging bits and bytes. - (c) Felix Mueller

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    234
    If I remember right WEP encryption uses 10 characters. Are you certain that's what it is?

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    18
    Thanks so much for your reply.

    They brought in a new wireless router -- something to do with the digital cable tv that was being bundled with internet service.

    Previously, I had no password protection. Just an open network. So he had me choose a 13 digit WEP password. That works fine to get my computer on the network, but not the SB.

    He gave me a cable to connect directly between my computer's ethernet port and the router if I should have to change settings. Unfortunately, I don't know how to do that, if that's what's called for.

    Quote Originally Posted by dBerriff View Post
    WiFi terminology has been inherited from the standards side with no attempt to make it more accessible ...

    Diagnosis at a distance is difficult but here goes...

    1. If your internet access has been upgraded this should have no affect on your WiFi set up. WiFi is purely internal to your network so unless they changed the settings on your wireless base-station (or router, or access point, or whatever you are used to calling it) nothing should have changed. So, the first question is: what exactly did they "upgrade". Did they mess around with your WiFi wireless settings?

    2. WEP is an old deprecated standard. No one who knew what they were doing (and here I mean the service provider who should not have left you wondering how to deal with the "upgrade") would "upgrade" to this. The current domestic standard is WPA, normally (in the UK at least) WPA with TKIP or WPA2 Personal for domestic use. If you have been given a password that is not a hexadecimal number (using the characters 0 - 9 and A -F [or a - f] only) - in other words just a normal password then you have a WPA set up.

    If you can check on or confirm the above that will help with what we suggest next.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by avta View Post
    If I remember right WEP encryption uses 10 characters. Are you certain that's what it is?
    area code, cell number, area code. Yeah, 13.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    18
    Shi-ZAM!

    (to quote old Gomer Pyle)

    Felix, that worked.

    I thank you.

    Amazing to me what expertise can be found on these forums.

    -Brenton

    Quote Originally Posted by fcm4711 View Post
    Hi there

    I think it's sad that a provider "upgrades" a customers router to use WEP as wireless encryption, because WEP is close to useless. The only wireless encryption standard right now that is not yet cracked it WPA2. Some even claim they can crack WPA within minutes.

    But I guess you probably aren't looking for a lecture about wireless security but for a solution. I think you need to convert the ASCII WEP key to a HEX key. This should give you 26 HEX numbers from your 13 ASCII characters.

    Try a WEP key converter like this one:

    http://www.dirtymonday.net/key_convert.html

    Hope this helps
    Felix

  8. #8
    Glad you got it fixed. I have learnt something too, only ever having used WEP as a demo when teaching and stuck to WPA for everything else. Now I know there are such things as WEP key convertors.
    Last edited by dBerriff; 2009-09-06 at 10:18.
    Clients: SB3, Boom. Server: work in progress, but PC Win. XP/SqueezeCenter (or whatever it is called this month) for now. Replay: AVI ADM9.1 Active Speakers. Personal: the technology is the means, the music is the end.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by dBerriff View Post
    Glad you got it fixed. I have learnt something too, only ever having used WEP as a demo when teaching and stuck to WPA for everything else. Now I know there are such things as WEP key convertors.
    I've book marked that page for the next time ... just thinking ahead so's I don't have to ask again.

    -Brenton

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