It's been an interesting journey, no? Some probably remember when listening to music was exclusively vinyl records, followed by various tape formats/players, then in the early decade of the '80s, Digital Audio Compact Disc made its debut. All these mediums required the purchase of one's favorite artist(s), often at a substantial investment.

About the middle of the decade of the 1990s, Internet radio/music streaming services became popular as the Internet matured. Many have come and gone. The most popular allowed subscribers to search and play from large libraries (catalogs) across a diverse musical universe. In 2005, Pandora and MOG made their debut. Pandora offered curations (radio channels) of various artists and was the first to use sophisticated software to both categorize musical genre (Musical Genome Project) as well as the listener's preferences. Pandora would then offer up similar artists that a subscriber might enjoy. The upshot from this approach was the discovery of little known but highly talented artists. However at that time, Pandora didn't offer access to all the works of any particular artist. On the other hand, MOG using the highest audio quality at the time, offered an easily searchable UI to their vast collection as well as the ability for subscribers to build their own sub-library of favorites.

One of the early streaming services (1999) was Digitally Imported. Strangely, it's never experienced the growth trajectories in subscribers like other companies, maybe because its first offering was a variety of the Electronica genre. Over the past two decades, it has grown to offer six streaming services (Electronica, Radio, Jazz, Classical, and Zen), each with dozen of curated "channels" (I count 377 total). What's attractive is its portability across devices, ease of use UI, and reasonable pricing. Unlike the larger services, DI.FM recognizes Squeezebox owners. (No, I have no connection to the company or owner other than being a satisfied subscriber.)

Over the past two plus years, I learned to turn off talk radio and tune into ClassicalRadio.com.