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  1. #101

    Motherboard Swap Successful, but Dead Motherboard Remains Dead

    I just completed a swap of innards and metal cases... The new motherboard from the unit with the chipped screen works fine in its new shell with the intact screen. So I now have an intact unit with a working Alpine install, soon to have LMS and Squeezelite... I'm installing it on a desktop hinged metal stand that looks pretty cool, and I'm going to hook it up to one of these remote control power outlets so I can turn it off and on without removing the power plug:

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    The motherboard from the original unit is now in the case with the chipped screen -- but it's definitely dead now! I think the screen did flicker briefly, but it was hard to tell. The blue light is no longer coming on -- the power seems dead on this unit now, it REALLY didn't like the transplant! Although the motherboards had the same revision and model number, the dead one had "A" printed in the lower left corner, whereas the TV Meter motherboard had "D" in the same spot:

    DEAD Board:

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    TV Meter Board:

    Name:  TV Meter.jpg
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    The only other differences I noticed were that the WiFi antenna connector pins in the upper left corner were different colors on the two boards, and that the dead board has some small white chips in places where the TV meter board had small black chips (look near the upper left hand corner of the HDMI connector box in the lower right of each photo, for example).

    Anyway, I had to buy two of these to get one that works and looks good, but I still paid less that the going rate for a new one on eBay. So I guess I'm good.

  2. #102
    Quote Originally Posted by sodface View Post
    By the way, did you install Alpine to the internal mmc or are just booting from USB still?
    I have Alpine installed on the internal MMC. It still boots up with the standard ChromeOS "scary screen" beeps declaring OS protection is off, as expected. No biggie.

  3. #103
    Hi sodface!

    Any time and advice for an Alpine newbie who is having difficulty getting some key stuff done in this "minimalist Linux installation?"

    Some background: I installed Alpine from a USB stick using the prepared .img files and ./install-mmc.sh script that you described at https://wiki.alpinelinux.org/wiki/Al...ainline_Kernel

    I had no problems with the install and saw no errors reported. I've created a non-root user and successfully installed the xfce desktop as a GUI. I also installed the Midori web browser -- but it has its quirks with https sites, I'm still getting used to it. I'm mainly using the Alpine command line as Root.

    I installed lms, jivelite, and squeezelite from your repos. I've installed alsa, too, and modified the alsamixer settings to listen to music on the Chromebase internal speakers while streaming from my NAS-based LMS using squeezelite (it took a while to figure out that the "M" key was the way to toggle the necessary settings off and on) -- it sounds pretty good, considering. (I haven't tried headphones yet.) Strangely, when I type 'lms' after installing it, Alpine reports "lms: not found" and nothing else happens. (The same thing happened when I tried to install vboot-utils on my other laptop running Alpine, by the way -- any ideas why?)

    I also tried using jivelite, and although it starts without errors and seems to be active, I clearly need to perform your setup procedure as described in the forums to get it working properly... Right now, jivelite's options seem limited and I can't get the touchscreen to work. What's the easiest way to get your scripts ts_calibrate, jivelite, and jivelite-sp on my Chromebase?

    I mention all of the above to demonstrate that I haven't been a slouch and I can get around Alpine in a pinch, more or less. I'm still figuring it out, of course. It's a bit different from the Ubuntu flavors I'm accustomed to.

    Meanwhile, I'm having problems in other areas, and just getting the basics right is becoming a real pain:

    * Internet connectivity does not persist after a reboot, ever! I have to reset it every time I restart the system from an "off" state -- or even after just rebooting from within Alpine. The "setup-interfaces" command doesn't seem reliable, it often seems unable to initialize my WiFi card (named "mlan0" in my case, for some odd reason) and just keeps asking about mlan0 over and over again, until I hit Ctl-C. Although "rc-service networking restart" works once in a while, most of the time I get "rc-service: Exec format error" and I'm stopped in my tracks. About the only thing that reliably gets me an IP address after booting is using the "ifup eth0" command.

    * I cannot get any FAT32 USB sticks to mount -- and although when I log into the GUI I can see them on the xfce desktop, my Chromebase reports that they are all in an "unknown format: 'vfat' " and are therefore unmountable.


    I know that some Linux distros are more user-friendly than others, but Alpine seems downright obtuse! The Alpine wiki pages I've found are sometimes useful, but they typically don't have the info I need to get things working...

    I know you're always busy, but if you could throw me a bone when you get the chance, it would be appreciated!

  4. #104
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Themistocles View Post
    Some background: I installed Alpine from a USB stick using the prepared .img files and ./install-mmc.sh script that you described at https://wiki.alpinelinux.org/wiki/Al...ainline_Kernel
    It's better if I walk through things as I type them up but I can't do that right now so I'm kinda going off memory here. After doing the script install to mmc you have a very minimal package set (as you know). It's actually the same root filesystem image that's on the USB stick, just enough to get booted up and connect to the network. After you run the install script you should do "setup-alpine" and walk through that whole setup script, though you'll want to skip the part about installing to disk.

    I had no problems with the install and saw no errors reported. I've created a non-root user and successfully installed the xfce desktop as a GUI. I also installed the Midori web browser -- but it has its quirks with https sites, I'm still getting used to it. I'm mainly using the Alpine command line as Root.
    Are you planning on running a desktop environment on it? My original testing was just jivelite running on the framebuffer without X or a GUI desktop. Recently I did install a minimal X environment with bspwm tiling window manager and tested out mpv video player but I haven't really done much with a browser.

    I installed lms, jivelite, and squeezelite from your repos. I've installed alsa, too, and modified the alsamixer settings to listen to music on the Chromebase internal speakers while streaming from my NAS-based LMS using squeezelite (it took a while to figure out that the "M" key was the way to toggle the necessary settings off and on) -- it sounds pretty good, considering. (I haven't tried headphones yet.) Strangely, when I type 'lms' after installing it, Alpine reports "lms: not found" and nothing else happens. (The same thing happened when I tried to install vboot-utils on my other laptop running Alpine, by the way -- any ideas why?)
    Again, kind of need to know what you are aiming for as a final config. You only need one LMS instance on your local network, do you plan on keeping it on your NAS or do you want to run LMS on the Chromebase instead of the NAS? Once you "apk add lms" you won't have an lms command. You should use the rc series of commands to start and stop lms via the init.d service scripts that get installed as part of the lms package. Take a look at the files:

    /etc/init.d/lms
    /etc/conf.d/lms

    The file in init.d you don't want to change but just take a look at it for your own info on what's happening with the start/stop actions. The lms file in the conf.d directory is where you add any startup arguments you want. I personally don't have any on my server so I haven't made any changes to the either of these two files.

    You can manually start and stop LMS with the command "rc-service lms start" and "rc-service lms stop" or use sudo if you aren't running as root. You should get some feedback that the service started or stopped. You can check status with the command "rc-status". You should see an entry for lms in the list with "started" out to the right. So that's the manual method. If you want lms to start on boot, just do "rc-update add lms" which will add the service to the default runlevel. Just do "rc-update" to see which services are set to start when. This same logic and commands applies to most everything that has a script in /etc/init.d and/or a companion config file in /etc/conf.d. Squeezelite has them too.

    I also tried using jivelite, and although it starts without errors and seems to be active, I clearly need to perform your setup procedure as described in the forums to get it working properly... Right now, jivelite's options seem limited and I can't get the touchscreen to work. What's the easiest way to get your scripts ts_calibrate, jivelite, and jivelite-sp on my Chromebase?
    Here's something you could try, assuming you don't mind blowing away your current load:

    - Reload the chromebase with the install-mmc script to get a fresh start
    - Run through "setup-alpine"
    - Setup my repo (I can't remember if it's already added or not in the root filesystem image)
    - Install my alps package with "apk add alps" that should pull down jivelite, squeezelite, alsa-utils and install the ts-calibrate, and jivelite init.d scripts and add the services to start at boot. It's also going to change your hostname to alps plus a portion of your mlan0 mac address. You can change it back after reboot if you want to.
    - Reboot and it _should_ come back and run the ts_calibrate wizard and then start jivelite.

    This does not install lms and depending on your decision on the NAS based LMS, maybe you don't want LMS on the chromebase anyway??

    I mention all of the above to demonstrate that I haven't been a slouch and I can get around Alpine in a pinch, more or less. I'm still figuring it out, of course. It's a bit different from the Ubuntu flavors I'm accustomed to.
    You are rocking and rolling! I'm biased I guess, but I think Alpine is worth the initial struggle. I really like starting from a minimal system and just adding on exactly what I want. And after you've been through the install and configs a few times it starts to click and get easier.

    Meanwhile, I'm having problems in other areas, and just getting the basics right is becoming a real pain:

    Internet connectivity does not persist after a reboot, ever! I have to reset it every time I restart the system from an "off" state -- or even after just rebooting from within Alpine. The "setup-interfaces" command doesn't seem reliable, it often seems unable to initialize my WiFi card (named "mlan0" in my case, for some odd reason) and just keeps asking about mlan0 over and over again, until I hit Ctl-C. Although "rc-service networking restart" works once in a while, most of the time I get "rc-service: Exec format error" and I'm stopped in my tracks. About the only thing that reliably gets me an IP address after booting is using the "ifup eth0" command.
    That seems sort of strange. I did have a few issues with wifi not connecting after reboot due to the clock being screwed up because the Chromebase doesn't seem to have battery backup to save the time/date and defaults to 2013. I'm pretty sure I updated the install download so that the swclock service starts at boot so that it sets the clock to the last shutdown time which should be close enough that it doesn't prevent the wifi from connecting. I'm hoping after you go through the setup-alpine steps that your wifi issue goes away. Oh, also you can try adding the wpa_supplicant service at boot:
    # rc-update add wpa_supplicant boot

    If you still have problems try _removing_ the networking service:
    # rc-update del networking boot

    Which you shouldn't have to do and sounds counter-intuitive, but basically what we are trying to do is make sure wpa_supplicant is starting first and authenticating with your access point and _then_ the networking service starts to setup the mlan0 interface and get a dhcp address. On my rpi's I've had it start in reverse order and it screws things up. Deleting the networking service and adding wpa_supplicant fixes it - networking gets started still as dependency but it's after wpa_supplicant which is the goal.

    * I cannot get any FAT32 USB sticks to mount -- and although when I log into the GUI I can see them on the xfce desktop, my Chromebase reports that they are all in an "unknown format: 'vfat' " and are therefore unmountable.[/B]
    Maybe try "modprobe vfat" or "modprobe fat"? Not sure I've run into this issue but I'm also not sure I've tried to mount a fat stick on the chromebase yet.

    I know that some Linux distros are more user-friendly than others, but Alpine seems downright obtuse! The Alpine wiki pages I've found are sometimes useful, but they typically don't have the info I need to get things working...

    I know you're always busy, but if you could throw me a bone when you get the chance, it would be appreciated!
    Hang in there, Alpine rocks!
    Last edited by sodface; 2021-07-27 at 20:32.

  5. #105

    Many Many Thanks! It Works Beautifully Now!

    Quote Originally Posted by sodface View Post
    Are you planning on running a desktop environment on it? My original testing was just jivelite running on the framebuffer without X or a GUI desktop. Recently I did install a minimal X environment with bspwm tiling window manager and tested out mpv video player but I haven't really done much with a browser.
    I don't plan on using a GUI (like the xfce desktop) very often, but I wanted to see how it ran on the Chromebase -- and that's surprisingly well! I find going through a GUI a little easier for most things on Linux, since my CLI experience is borderline... but this was a test of a "nice to have" feature for my amusement and edification, not a required feature in my final setup. But I'll probably install xfce again, just to have it in reserve for future interaction with Alpine Linux.

    You only need one LMS instance on your local network, do you plan on keeping it on your NAS or do you want to run LMS on the Chromebase instead of the NAS?
    Oh, I'll definitely be staying with LMS on my Synology NAS! But in the spirit of thoroughly evaluating of my Alpine install, I wanted to see what would happen with LMS on the Chromebase. Again, this was just part of my tests to see how your various Squeezebox software packages functioned under Alpine. I can see that "lms" on a Chromebase is not what I want, so I won't need to install it in my final working setup. But thanks for those manual lms tips which are applicable to squeezelite, that may come in handy!

    Here's something you could try, assuming you don't mind blowing away your current load:

    - Reload the chromebase with the install-mmc script to get a fresh start
    - Run through "setup-alpine"
    - Setup my repo (I can't remember if it's already added or not in the root filesystem image)
    - Install my alps package with "apk add alps" that should pull down jivelite, squeezelite, alsa-utils and install the ts-calibrate, and jivelite init.d scripts and add the services to start at boot. It's also going to change your hostname to alps plus a portion of your mlan0 mac address. You can change it back after reboot if you want to.
    - Reboot and it _should_ come back and run the ts_calibrate wizard and then start jivelite.
    Done! But with some interesting bumps along the road... The very first time I tried this, I got an error saying there was "no more room" on the device...?

    So I guessed that I was unknowingly either trying to write to the USB drive or to some protected sector on the MMC, or maybe that I corrupted the USB drive in some other way. So I rewrote your original .img file on the USB stick all over again and then reattempted the above procedure. The second time, it worked like a charm and touchscreen calibration with Jivelite came up almost instantly after booting. You also had the alsamixer internal speaker fixes pre-set so I could play music on the Chromebase immediately -- sweet!

    In addition, after having run all of your "alps" scripts, ethernet and WiFi appear to be rock solid and internet reconnection is now seemless at every boot, as expected. Outstanding!

    Here's what my Chromebase looks like now -- all's good:

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    However, I have a few questions about tweaking the system to make it even more to my liking...

    Now that I'm running your scripts successfully and my Chromebase will always go directly to Jivelite at boot time, is there an "elegant" way to interrupt that process and boot directly to the command line, if I wanted to? Or is it best to simply wait for Jivelite to boot cleanly and then just "quit" Jivelite to get back to the command line? That's easy enough, too... Also, I recall that you mentioned in the forums that you changed your gbb flags to reduce boot time, eliminate those annoying ChromeOS beeps at boot, and add your own Alpine boot logo screen. Is your new logo screen a REPLACEMENT for the standard ChromeOS "scary screen" that warns that OS protection is off? Or does your logo simply appear AFTER the ChromeOS warning screen? Can I change gbb flags from WITHIN Alpine, or do I have to take the back off the Chromebase again and use my laptop with CH341A programmer clip to get those tweaks done?

    Anyway, my story pretty much has a happy ending at this point, with one mild annoyance concerning external USB devices as epilogue:

    I formatted a USB as ext4 on a Win10 machine with a partition manager -- the Win10 machine can't read or mount the ext4 drive, of course, but it happily mounts on the Chromebase! That's nice, but of limited utility to me -- I can use this USB stick to transfer data between Linux devices, but most of my hardware is Win10 based and can't mount any ext4 partitions. Oh well. I guess some USB access is better than none...

    Meanwhile, as far as mounting FAT32 or exFAT USB sticks go, this new install doesn't report "unknown format 'vfat' " anymore, so that's a mild relief. However, now it says that the commands I'm trying (like "mount /dev/sda1 /mnt" or "mount /dev/sdb1 /media/usb") contain "invalid arguments." I guess that's progress -- although I don't see any errors in those commands. I even tried installing dosfstools, but that didn't help.

    (It's just Alpine being Alpine, I guess! )

    By the way, I tried the commands "modeprobe fat" and "modprobe vfat," but Alpine ignored them completely -- no errors, no confirmations, no output of any kind, just back to the empty command line and blinking cursor. Sigh. Another nut to crack at another time, I suppose. Properly loading up FAT-formatted USB devices on the Chromebase will be very "nice to have," but it's not critical at this point.

    I've got my "Squeezebox Touch on Steroids" now and I'm a happy camper! Kudos to you for helping me get this system polished up and ready to play!

  6. #106
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Themistocles View Post
    I don't plan on using a GUI (like the xfce desktop) very often, but I wanted to see how it ran on the Chromebase -- and that's surprisingly well! I find going through a GUI a little easier for most things on Linux, since my CLI experience is borderline... but this was a test of a "nice to have" feature for my amusement and edification, not a required feature in my final setup. But I'll probably install xfce again, just to have it in reserve for future interaction with Alpine Linux.
    Copy that, I found the bspwm environment quite responsive as well. I packaged touchegg for Alpine which provides for multitouch gestures and it worked quite well to swipe and switch between workspaces. So I was thinking about having jivelite on one workspace, swipe to the next workspace and have some traffic cams or something, swipe to the next workspace and have ... something else, weather maybe?

    Oh, I'll definitely be staying with LMS on my Synology NAS! But in the spirit of thoroughly evaluating of my Alpine install, I wanted to see what would happen with LMS on the Chromebase. Again, this was just part of my tests to see how your various Squeezebox software packages functioned under Alpine. I can see that "lms" on a Chromebase is not what I want, so I won't need to install it in my final working setup. But thanks for those manual lms tips which are applicable to squeezelite, that may come in handy!
    Copy again, I wasn't sure if you were doing something portable with the Chromebase where you wanted a self contained server/player that you could take with you somewhere. Not sure where that would be in your case but I've thought about the need to have a player at the house with enough onboard storage to mirror my main music collection to but portable enough that I could grab it and use it in our travel trailer when we go "camping" and then bring home again. I'd rather do something like that then leave something permanently in the trailer. I think.

    Done! But with some interesting bumps along the road... The very first time I tried this, I got an error saying there was "no more room" on the device...?

    So I guessed that I was unknowingly either trying to write to the USB drive or to some protected sector on the MMC, or maybe that I corrupted the USB drive in some other way. So I rewrote your original .img file on the USB stick all over again and then reattempted the above procedure. The second time, it worked like a charm and touchscreen calibration with Jivelite came up almost instantly after booting. You also had the alsamixer internal speaker fixes pre-set so I could play music on the Chromebase immediately -- sweet!

    In addition, after having run all of your "alps" scripts, ethernet and WiFi appear to be rock solid and internet reconnection is now seemless at every boot, as expected. Outstanding!

    Here's what my Chromebase looks like now -- all's good:
    That is excellent indeed! I was holding my breath about the alps package because it was something I really just put together for myself because I was getting tired with some of the manual setup. I have a bigger idea in mind for it but it's not there yet and this wasn't really ready for prime time, I'm glad that it worked ok. Great album choice for the glamour shot too!

    However, I have a few questions about tweaking the system to make it even more to my liking...

    Now that I'm running your scripts successfully and my Chromebase will always go directly to Jivelite at boot time, is there an "elegant" way to interrupt that process and boot directly to the command line, if I wanted to? Or is it best to simply wait for Jivelite to boot cleanly and then just "quit" Jivelite to get back to the command line? That's easy enough, too...
    I've been doing the latter. I'm not sure how to have it both ways. Either you have a "hand's off" boot all the way to jivelite, or you boot to a login and then have to start jivelite manually. If you have any ideas on that I'd be interested. Especially without always having a keyboard attached.

    Also, I recall that you mentioned in the forums that you changed your gbb flags to reduce boot time, eliminate those annoying ChromeOS beeps at boot, and add your own Alpine boot logo screen. Is your new logo screen a REPLACEMENT for the standard ChromeOS "scary screen" that warns that OS protection is off? Or does your logo simply appear AFTER the ChromeOS warning screen? Can I change gbb flags from WITHIN Alpine, or do I have to take the back off the Chromebase again and use my laptop with CH341A programmer clip to get those tweaks done?
    You can change the gbb flags within Alpine provided that wp-status we discussed earlier is disabled, which as we learned should be the case if 1. The write-protect screw is removed (or electrically insulated) 2. The device secret key is deleted from the VPD area. I think you did option 2 already so you should be good? Install flashrom-chromium to check the status. Install vboot-utils to get the gbb_utility. But that's just to shorten the delay and remove the beep, see this guide:
    https://gist.github.com/CoolOppo/183f42eef4e5cab328d7

    Swapping out the image is a bit more involved, see:
    https://jcs.org/2016/08/26/openbsd_c...-splash-screen

    I'm sort of drawing some blanks on this particular procedure, not sure if I was drinking beer that night or what.

    //break //break

    Ok, I just figured out what I did and tested it. I uploaded the pre-built file:

    Code:
    # wget http://www.sodface.com/repo/gbb-alpine-bootsplash.rom
    # flashrom -p host -i GBB:gbb-alpine-bootsplash.rom -w
    # reboot
    That should get you the short delay, no beep, and the alpine logo. If you want something other than that you'll have to construct a new gbb rom file. Oh, and to answer your question, it replaces the scary white screen.

    Anyway, my story pretty much has a happy ending at this point, with one mild annoyance concerning external USB devices as epilogue:
    I'm not sure what's going on with that. I just tested it with a fat32 formatted usb stick and can mount it straight away on my alpine desktop but not on the chromebase. I see some difference in the kernel configs between the two so I will experiment with that on the next build. Thanks for pointing this out.

    I've got my "Squeezebox Touch on Steroids" now and I'm a happy camper! Kudos to you for helping me get this system polished up and ready to play!
    I'm really glad you got it working and are pleased with it. Let me know if you think of any other improvements or ideas.
    Last edited by sodface; 2021-07-28 at 20:20.

  7. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by sodface View Post
    I packaged touchegg for Alpine which provides for multitouch gestures and it worked quite well to swipe and switch between workspaces. So I was thinking about having jivelite on one workspace, swipe to the next workspace and have some traffic cams or something, swipe to the next workspace and have ... something else, weather maybe?
    This is a very cool idea, given the big juicy screen on the Chromebase! I can't find touchegg in the repos, but I'd like to give it a try sometime.

    I wasn't sure if you were doing something portable with the Chromebase where you wanted a self contained server/player that you could take with you somewhere. Not sure where that would be in your case but I've thought about the need to have a player at the house with enough onboard storage to mirror my main music collection to but portable enough that I could grab it and use it in our travel trailer when we go "camping" and then bring home again. I'd rather do something like that then leave something permanently in the trailer.
    This briefly occurred to me, but I dismissed it quickly enough since WiFi is required for LMS (at minimum) and that's not as reliable on the road. If I need music while traveling or camping, any portable music player and speaker would be fine for me. Attempting "mobile LMS" would be frustrating, I bet.

    Either you have a "hand's off" boot all the way to jivelite, or you boot to a login and then have to start jivelite manually. If you have any ideas on that I'd be interested. Especially without always having a keyboard attached.
    Yeah, I think without a keyboard available, booting all the way to Jivelite makes the most sense. As a dedicated music machine, a keyboard wouldn't be needed with the Chromebase most of the time, since you've got the tough screen working in Jivelite. But if quick root access were needed, do you have any idea if bluetooth keyboards could work, at least there'd be fewer cables? That could make things more convenient once I locate this unit in its final "home base."

    Many thanks for creating that updated ROM that could clean up my boot screens and warning beeps! Yes, I deleted the device's "secret key," so I shouldn't need to access the write-protect screw to modify the gbb flags... However, I had a fatal error when I tried your code:

    # wget http://www.sodface.com/repo/gbb-alpine-bootsplash.rom
    # flashrom -p host -i GBB:gbb-alpine-bootsplash.rom -w
    # reboot
    Even though I have flashrom, vpd, and vboot-utils installed on my Chromebase, attempting the second command above has flashrom reporting Error: Unknown programmer "host."

    I don't know how to get around that...?

    I just tested it with a fat32 formatted usb stick and can mount it straight away on my alpine desktop but not on the chromebase. I see some difference in the kernel configs between the two so I will experiment with that on the next build. Thanks for pointing this out.
    I've had partial success fixing this! My Chromebase can now recognize and mount exFAT partitions, which work fine on Win10 and Mac, so this is probably an optimal format choice. I'm not exactly sure which step I took to make this stick, but it turns out that it happened after I tweaked my xfce desktop install. First I visited this page: https://wiki.alpinelinux.org/wiki/Xfce_Setup

    Then I scrolled down to "Auto-mounting USB drives" and performed the recommended installs that I thought I might ever want or need (and that was all of them, except gvfs-gphoto2 - digital cameras and mobile devices that use PTP). I just don't know if installing gvfs was a prerequisite for my later success... but ultimately, I discovered and installed fuse-exfat -- and that sealed the deal! Now I can mount exFAT partitions without difficulty, and it's especially easy in the xfce GUI. Sadly, there are no packages called fuse-fat or fuse-fat32, so exFAT seems to be my best option -- and as I said, it's understood by Mac and Windows, so it should satisfy most users.

    I have no further suggestions for now -- if and when I get that new ROM installed, I think I'll nearly have a perfect machine for my needs!

  8. #108
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Themistocles View Post
    I can't find touchegg in the repos
    Make sure you uncomment the testing repo in /etc/apk/repositories
    https://pkgs.alpinelinux.org/package...gg&branch=edge


    do you have any idea if bluetooth keyboards could work,
    Well I know regular wireless keyboards work but I'm not sure on bluetooth.

    Many thanks for creating that updated ROM that could clean up my boot screens and warning beeps! Yes, I deleted the device's "secret key," so I shouldn't need to access the write-protect screw to modify the gbb flags... However, I had a fatal error when I tried your code:

    Even though I have flashrom, vpd, and vboot-utils installed on my Chromebase, attempting the second command above has flashrom reporting Error: Unknown programmer "host."

    I don't know how to get around that...?
    Maybe you did "apk install flashrom" instead of "apk add flashrom-chromium" which would pull the package from the alpine repo instead of the sodface repo? Do you see "host" listed at the bottom list of available programmer options?

    Code:
    desk-5070:~$ sudo flashrom
    [sudo] password for sodface: 
    flashrom unknown on Linux 5.10.43-0-lts (x86_64)
    flashrom is free software, get the source code at https://flashrom.org
    
    Please select a programmer with the --programmer parameter.
    To choose the mainboard of this computer use 'internal'. Valid choices are:
    internal, dummy, mec1308, nic3com, nicrealtek, gfxnvidia, raiden_debug_spi,
    drkaiser, satasii, serprog, buspirate_spi, dediprog, ene_lpc, rayer_spi,
    nicintel, nicintel_spi, ogp_spi, satamv, linux_mtd, linux_spi, ch341a_spi,
    google_ec, ec, host.
    release_lock called but lock was not held on firmware_utility_lock.
    If so you'll need to "apk del flashrom" then "apk add flashrom-chromium"

    I've had partial success fixing this! My Chromebase can now recognize and mount exFAT partitions, which work fine on Win10 and Mac, so this is probably an optimal format choice. I'm not exactly sure which step I took to make this stick, but it turns out that it happened after I tweaked my xfce desktop install. First I visited this page: https://wiki.alpinelinux.org/wiki/Xfce_Setup

    Then I scrolled down to "Auto-mounting USB drives" and performed the recommended installs that I thought I might ever want or need (and that was all of them, except gvfs-gphoto2 - digital cameras and mobile devices that use PTP). I just don't know if installing gvfs was a prerequisite for my later success... but ultimately, I discovered and installed fuse-exfat -- and that sealed the deal! Now I can mount exFAT partitions without difficulty, and it's especially easy in the xfce GUI. Sadly, there are no packages called fuse-fat or fuse-fat32, so exFAT seems to be my best option -- and as I said, it's understood by Mac and Windows, so it should satisfy most users.
    Hmmm, ok, I tested successfully on my desktop which is running xfce so maybe that's why it worked there.
    Last edited by sodface; 2021-07-30 at 19:06.

  9. #109
    Quote Originally Posted by sodface View Post
    Make sure you uncomment the testing repo in /etc/apk/repositories
    https://pkgs.alpinelinux.org/package...gg&branch=edge
    Worked like a charm! Now I have touchegg successfully installed, but it tells me to "Make sure that your DISPLAY environment variable is set." I guess I need to properly set up a .conf file somewhere... I'm Googling that now.

    Well I know regular wireless keyboards work but I'm not sure on bluetooth.
    You mean wireless keyboards with a dongle? My wireless keyboards are Logitech Unifying and I haven't used that kind of proprietary dongle on a Linux machine before. I'll check that out. Meanwhile, I just discovered bluez and installed it. I'll dig out a bluetooth keyboard later and try to figure this out... I'll let you know if I make any breakthroughs.

    Maybe you did "apk install flashrom" instead of "apk add flashrom-chromium" which would pull the package from the alpine repo instead of the sodface repo?
    Duh! I'm a moron -- yes, I made that rookie error and now it's fixed. Your new ROM works wonderfully! A very nice piece of work indeed.

  10. #110
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    263
    Quote Originally Posted by Themistocles View Post
    Worked like a charm! Now I have touchegg successfully installed, but it tells me to "Make sure that your DISPLAY environment variable is set." I guess I need to properly set up a .conf file somewhere... I'm Googling that now.
    I know almost zilch about touchegg, I just wanted to try it, it wasn't in the official Alpine repos, so I managed to package it, test it, and get it merged. The packages I have in my sodface repo are the ones that I think will take quite a bit of work to get to the point where the Alpine devs would merge them. They are pretty strict about how things should be packaged.

    You mean wireless keyboards with a dongle? My wireless keyboards are Logitech Unifying and I haven't used that kind of proprietary dongle on a Linux machine before. I'll check that out. Meanwhile, I just discovered bluez and installed it. I'll dig out a bluetooth keyboard later and try to figure this out... I'll let you know if I make any breakthroughs.
    Yes, the old tech ones, what are they called, just RF or something, a logitech one with built in touchpad is what I've been using, not bluetooth.

    Duh! I'm a moron -- yes, I made that rookie error and now it's fixed. Your new ROM works wonderfully! A very nice piece of work indeed.

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