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  1. #171
    dasos - this did address it, but I think in a roundabout way. So, first - creating a volume and using that as where the config folder maps woprks.

    But, I'm not able to determine is WHERE volumes are actually stored if you use Linux Containers on Windows. Based on the location shown in portainer, I think it's actually generated within the LinuxVM used for Linux Containers in Windows and isn't actually present anywhere on the host system. This defeats the purpose a bit since I can't access those files directly.

    Given, I could be misunderstanding the intention of volumes totally.

  2. #172
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Necromancyr View Post
    But, I'm not able to determine is WHERE volumes are actually stored if you use Linux Containers on Windows. Based on the location shown in portainer, I think it's actually generated within the LinuxVM used for Linux Containers in Windows and isn't actually present anywhere on the host system. This defeats the purpose a bit since I can't access those files directly.
    So, I don't really know Docker on Windows (or Windows really), but StackOverflow discusses it here. As you say, they appear to be in some sort of VM.

    But my question is why do you want to access the files directly? The point of a volume is that you can just let Docker deal with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Necromancyr View Post
    Given, I could be misunderstanding the intention of volumes totally.
    Using Docker often means changing how you think about things. It might help to think less where files are, and instead think about the volume as a journalling mechanism. It captures all the changes that an app makes, like a snapshot. And this is then very portable. (I over simplify.)

    Apart from backups, I don't think I've ever wanted to access the LMS volume. If you wanted to pock around, you can spin up another container, connect the volume to it, and do what you want. Take a look at the Docker documentation on volumes, specifically, making a backup of a volume. One command will make a Ubuntu container to access your volume and tar the contents to a file for you.

    If there is something you specifically need to edit or change within the container, then these days it is common to use environment variables to specify options to the image. This lets a container be very disposable, and you may not need a volume at all. One potential feature for the LMS container would be to specify a Spotify username and password as an environment variable in the compose file. Then, when you spin up the container, you don't need to do setup; Spotty is set up and ready to run.

  3. #173
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by dasos View Post
    So I don't use Windows, but I do see many people struggling with permissions. Why not use a volume? It's generally not recommended to persist data using a bind mount (but I know it is super common). Anyway, try something like this. You can add port mappings if you prefer.
    Code:
    version: "2"
    services:
     lms:
        image: doliana/logitech-media-server
        network_mode: host
        volumes:
          - M:\ServerFolders\music:/srv/music
          - K:\Docker\timezone:/etc/timezone:ro
          - lms_config:/srv/squeezebox
    volumes:
      lms_config:
    I agree that Docker Volumes are the preferred way for persistent data in a Docker setup nowadays. Therefore I intend to focus on this after my final testing of the amentioned library rescan tests.
    Living Room: HifiBerry DAC+ Pro & piCorePlayer
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