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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by slartibartfast View Post
    If these big capacitors are on the DC side of a rectifier how would they send power back to the power lines?
    remember most of these "cheap" devices doesnt have a Transformer Protector Diode like a laboratory power supply.
    Only this diode will stop the current to go back.

    Anyway The only thing that solves his proble is dismantle the PSU, check everything or buy a new one.
    There are too many may and be s what really happend.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Jeff07971's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJanGo View Post
    remember most of these "cheap" devices doesnt have a Transformer Protector Diode like a laboratory power supply.
    Only this diode will stop the current to go back.

    Anyway The only thing that solves his proble is dismantle the PSU, check everything or buy a new one.
    There are too many may and be s what really happend.
    The "main" Caps in a SMPSU are on both sides of the transformer, smoothing and storage @ 320Vdc on the primary and smoothing and storage @ 5Vdc on the secondary.
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by DJanGo View Post
    remember most of these "cheap" devices doesnt have a Transformer Protector Diode like a laboratory power supply.
    Only this diode will stop the current to go back.

    Anyway The only thing that solves his proble is dismantle the PSU, check everything or buy a new one.
    There are too many may and be s what really happend.
    Every DC supply regardless of cost has such ‘transformer protector diode’ already built-in.

    It is called the rectifier bridge. And in a DC supply, there is nowhere for the rectified current to backfeed to, as it is a transformer-coupled topology. Perhaps you are confusing such a mystery diode with an inrush current thermistor, which are more common on better supplies with heavier filter loads.

    The primary difference between a $5 wallwart and a $500 ‘precision’ supply are the quality, quantity and values of the core parts. Big toroidal core windings, exotic diode types, and banks of first-tier filter electrolytics are not cheap. All the rest are variations of the same old three step: voltage stepping, rectification, and filtering.

    Back to the OT: powering a SB3 or Touch is child’s play. All they need is a 5vdc output at 2A or better. Nothing too fancy, and even a higher current USB charger could probably handle the job. They do sound a little better on a quieter supply, in my experience.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Fizbin View Post
    Strange how turning a breaking off and on would do that. I wonder if the outcome would have been the same if the power (lines) went off and on?

    Probably. Depending on the utility provider, and the configuration of the circuits and their respective loads on energizing, every time you re-energize at the service panel or elsewhere, you run the risk of a transient on the line. Some larger loads push all sorts of irregularities on the local circuit as they cycle off and on.

    Depending on the voltage sensitivity of the connected equipment, that can either weaken internal components over time or take them out outright. And few power supplies are going to stop those kinds of transients from reaching the supply rails for a few milliseconds. So the equipment slowly takes hits, eroding the weakest parts (usually microprocessors) to eventual failure. And today, even major appliances like refrigerators are stuffed full of chips.

    So your best bet with today’s electronics is always a three tiered transient protection strategy, starting at the meter, continuing at the service panel, with final local protection at the outlets supplying the devices. This will catch the bigger grid spikes from getting too far into your location, while catching the smaller remainder waveform and protecting the devices from each other at the outlets themselves. On the most critical equipment, full sine-wave protection UPS is practically a necessity today.

    You would be amazed at how much longer all electrical devices last when given comprehensive transient protection.

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