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  1. #1
    Senior Member pablolie's Avatar
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    Linux VMs running on Win10+VMwareWorkstationPro

    This probably a very specialized and a bit esoteric discussion.

    But it may help some people who may consider going the same route as I did. I have no Linux based players (which most Linux discussions are about it seems). I have classic Slimdevices and Logitech players. My goal is to keep them running. They rock (IMHO).

    I decided to run LMS on a dedicated VM (details in my sig) because I liked the idea of immediate portability; i.e. if I upgrade my main machine, or decide to turn it off or run it elsewhere, al I have to do is spin up the virtual machine (Ubuntu 16.04 with LMS 7.9) elsewhere and it will run, right?

    Unfortunately it's not quite as easy, intuitive and immediate. 3 things don't migrate well:

    1. Network configuration. Go for bridged. It'll save you a lot of issues with LMS. You have to set that up in the VM management sw, not the vm itself.
    2. Music directory visibility to LMS. I have no idea why that is. I would have assumed if you have the same NTFS drive connected to the exact same vm running ubuntu, hey, the fastab stuff should work right away when you connect the external NTFS drive. But that is not so. You'll have to mess about with your fstab again.
    3. Network accessibility of your music collection aka Samba configuration. Gone too when you migrate the vm. Odd. I like to have that because I tend to rip new CDs on my Win10 dbPoweramp app, and then easily drop them into the music directory (owned by the Ubuntu VM).

    So while that makes my goal of having "immediate migration" ability moot, I shall stick to this configuration model. Simply because, while a tad frustrating at times, it keeps my Linux command line fundamentals going some.

    I have noticed that with some recent Ubuntu versions the headache had become less, but some basic stuff in the areas described above remains a tad unpredictable.

    Takeaway: don't expect your OVA vm files to transparently work elsewhere, even when you bring the exact same external drive to the table...
    Last edited by pablolie; 2017-12-05 at 21:30.
    ...pablo
    Server: Virtual Machine (on VMware Workstation 14 Pro) running Ubuntu 16.04 + LMS 7.9
    System: SB Touch -optical-> Benchmark DAC2HGC -AnalysisPlus Oval Copper XLR-> NAD M22 Power Amp -AnalysisPlus Black Mesh Oval-> Totem Element Fire
    Other Rooms: 2x SB Boom; 1x SB Radio; 1x SB Classic-> NAD D7050 -> Totem DreamCatcher + Velodyne Minivee Sub
    Computer audio: workstation -USB-> audioengine D1 -> Grado PS500e/Shure 1540

  2. #2
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    You can fix #2 by either using "shared folders" in vmware to present local filesystems to the VM (then mount the hgfs volume inside the VM), or what I'd probably do is move all the files into the VM, on a vmdk, and have *it* serve them with samba. Then it does indeed become self contained and portable.


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    --
    Hardware: 3x Touch, 1x Radio, 2x Receivers, 1 HP Microserver NAS with Debian+LMS 7.9.0
    Music: ~1300 CDs, as 450 GB of 16/44k FLACs. No less than 3x 24/44k albums..

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmatt View Post
    You can fix #2 by either using "shared folders" in vmware to present local filesystems to the VM (then mount the hgfs volume inside the VM), or what I'd probably do is move all the files into the VM, on a vmdk, and have *it* serve them with samba. Then it does indeed become self contained and portable.


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    Thats going to result in a very very large VMDK File which I would suggest will be impossible to back up as a single entity.

    If the host was Linux and not Windows things would be dead easy,
    VB2.4 storage QNAP TS419p (NFS)
    Living Room - Joggler & SB3 -> Onkyo TS606 -> Celestion F20s
    Office - Pi3+Sreen -> Sony TAFE320 -> Celestion F10s / Pi2+DAC & SB3 -> Onkyo CRN755 -> Wharfedale Modus Cubes
    Dining Room -> SB Boom
    Kitchen -> UE Radio (upgraded to SB Radio)
    Bedroom (Bedside) - Pi2+DAC ->ToppingTP21 ->AKG Headphones
    Bedroom (TV) - SB Touch ->Sherwood AVR ->Mordaunt Short M10s
    Everything controlled by iPeng

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by d6jg View Post
    Thats going to result in a very very large VMDK File which I would suggest will be impossible to back up as a single entity.

    If the host was Linux and not Windows things would be dead easy,
    Yes. Or several glued together in an LVM volume group (I wouldn't create vmdks bigger than 2TB). Back it up from inside the VM if you prefer, you don't have to back it up as a single entity, it doesn't really matter how you do it. Rsync it to another machine, copy it to backblaze, OneDrive, xfsdump, tar, dar, Bacula, Amanda, whatever. That's a secondary problem no matter how you store it up front.


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    --
    Hardware: 3x Touch, 1x Radio, 2x Receivers, 1 HP Microserver NAS with Debian+LMS 7.9.0
    Music: ~1300 CDs, as 450 GB of 16/44k FLACs. No less than 3x 24/44k albums..

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmatt View Post
    Yes. Or several glued together in an LVM volume group (I wouldn't create vmdks bigger than 2TB). Back it up from inside the VM if you prefer, you don't have to back it up as a single entity, it doesn't really matter how you do it. Rsync it to another machine, copy it to backblaze, OneDrive, xfsdump, tar, dar, Bacula, Amanda, whatever. That's a secondary problem no matter how you store it up front.


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    I would suggest that to make it truly portable the VMDK needs to contain just the basic Linux OS, LMS and its preferences and have the music folder elsewhere but connected via NFS or Samba. I agree that the music folder needs to be backed up separately in any one of a number of ways that you suggest (and others).

    Portability is a key thing in a Pi based LMS. Provided you use the same NFS / SMB mount then a rebuild is dead easy and takes 5 minutes if you have had the foresight to create a backup of the SD card somehwere.

    Returning to the original issue it ought to be possible to share the files on Windows via SMB over the network via UNC IP map. A direct connection to the disc is going to present privilege issues I would think.
    VB2.4 storage QNAP TS419p (NFS)
    Living Room - Joggler & SB3 -> Onkyo TS606 -> Celestion F20s
    Office - Pi3+Sreen -> Sony TAFE320 -> Celestion F10s / Pi2+DAC & SB3 -> Onkyo CRN755 -> Wharfedale Modus Cubes
    Dining Room -> SB Boom
    Kitchen -> UE Radio (upgraded to SB Radio)
    Bedroom (Bedside) - Pi2+DAC ->ToppingTP21 ->AKG Headphones
    Bedroom (TV) - SB Touch ->Sherwood AVR ->Mordaunt Short M10s
    Everything controlled by iPeng

  6. #6
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    You could use two vmdks... Yeah I would generally say that's a better idea than lumping it all in one big image.
    You could also get the shared folders stuff working. That will always consistently mount the same windows content in the same place anytime you power up the VM.


    Transcoded from Matt's brain by Tapatalk
    --
    Hardware: 3x Touch, 1x Radio, 2x Receivers, 1 HP Microserver NAS with Debian+LMS 7.9.0
    Music: ~1300 CDs, as 450 GB of 16/44k FLACs. No less than 3x 24/44k albums..

  7. #7
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    Hm, next time you want to Virtualize LMS, I would strongly suggest you create a VM using Vortexbox.

    Vortexbox is a super simple lightweight Linux distribution that includes LMS, Samba shares and a bunch of useful utilities. It is dead simple to install and setup.

    I have used Virtualization for over 10 years and I always try and setup VMs that are as lightweight as possible. Each VM is dedicated to one specific purpose. It makes upgrades and maintenance much easier than trying to maintain LMS installed on something like a full install of Ubuntu running a variety of other packages.

    Vortexbox website: www.vortexbox.org
    Downloads: http://wiki.vortexbox.org/available_images

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by pablolie View Post
    Takeaway: don't expect your OVA vm files to transparently work elsewhere, even when you bring the exact same external drive to the table...
    You cant expect a funtion from a tool thats never designed for this function...

    Using the Network in Bridge Mode:
    The origin LMS was installed in a Network called 192.168.1.0/24 - whenever someone else who runs his Network under eg. 10.11.12.0/24 you have to "change" something somewhere.
    You cant expect a VMWareplayer under win/tux/osx to use the same methods (and devicenames) to find a "external" usb Harddisk.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zounder1 View Post
    Vortexbox is a super simple lightweight Linux distribution that includes LMS, Samba shares and a bunch of useful utilities. It is dead simple to install and setup.

    I have used Virtualization for over 10 years and I always try and setup VMs that are as lightweight as possible. Each VM is dedicated to one specific purpose. It makes upgrades and maintenance much easier than trying to maintain LMS installed on something like a full install of Ubuntu running a variety of other packages.
    Hi,
    your 1.st and 2.nd statement didnt match together...
    And its not helping any further to this topic - you need to adjust things whenever something outside changes.

    There is a lot more brain involved to handle a task like that as just use a out of the box fedore type of "distribution".

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJanGo View Post
    Hi,
    your 1.st and 2.nd statement didnt match together...
    And its not helping any further to this topic - you need to adjust things whenever something outside changes.

    There is a lot more brain involved to handle a task like that as just use a out of the box fedore type of "distribution".
    How so? Vorterbox by default installs a working LMS server. You can add samba and other utilities if you want or need additional functionality. Vortexbox is a very lightweight distribution based on Fedora. Is does not install a GUI. You use the web interface to interact with it. It has a very small install footprint compared to an Ubuntu workstation install as a result. It is simple to setup. It is simple to run.

    So yes statement 1 and 2 match together fine.

    As to your comment "its not helping any further to this topic" Well, again, I respectfully disagree. Instead of going the route the OP chose, Vortexbox offers a super simple way to run LMS in a virtualization environment. Ubuntu is an option of course. But I am offering an alternative to what OP did that might help other users thinking of virtualizing LMS.

    Based on OP's comments he found setting up LMS on Ubuntu to be a frustrating and likely time consuming. It is great he persevered and got LMS running to his satisfaction on Ubuntu. But for a lot of users they will give up if the learning curve is too steep. Vortexbox does all the heavy lifting and would have addressed all three of his big roadblocks with minimal effort.

    For someone that just wants to enjoy their music on LMS, Vortexbox is an option that I strongly recommend.

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