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Thread: Choose NAS

  1. #11
    Senior Member iPhone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KjellTore View Post
    One of my NAS Duo died just now and I want to buy a new NAS.
    What kind of choices do I have for NAS running Logitech Media Server?
    Synology DiskStation DS216j?
    Western Digital My Cloud?
    Other suggestions?

    I do not want the most expensive soloutions
    Hello and welcome to the Forum. I highly recommend NOT buying or using any NAS. Yes they work, yes there are some decent ones out their, but you get so much more power and use out of a real media server. If you don't want to deal with Windows, NT, or other OSs, I can highly recommend Vortexbox 2.4. It is a media server OS built on Fedora Linux. It easily runs LMS and PLEX as well as other useful powerful programs so it can act as an NAS if you need to store files that are not music, movies, or picture files.

    An older PC can be used as a target PC to put Vortexbox onto (note: Vortexbox wipes ALL drives and places a Fedora OS on the PC). Or an older PC can be used as a starting point and additional parts added to make the Media Server you need. On an additional note, a true 64bit CPU and Motherboard make the best donor/target PC for Vortexbox. One can add an SSD drive to run the OS on and all other added drives will be storage. I highly recommend not setting up any RAID because it is NOT backup, just make proper timely backups to USB drives with the built in Backing Up procedure. If you have questions about Vortexbox have a look at their website or ask on this forum as several of us are running it. Lastly, note that Vortexbox 2.4 REQUIRES a true 64 bit machine, if the target PC is 32 bit one must use Vortexbox 2.3.

    I have owned 2 different NAS machines and neither were able to deal with my library or really made a decent LMS Server (and I had high end NAS units). Just my two cents from somebody that has been doing this for over a decade.
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  2. #12
    Babelfish's Best Boy mherger's Avatar
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    Wow... a lot has been written. Some confusing, some helpful, some plain wrong. So here's my suggestion(s).

    • If you want a system which just works without fuzzing around: get a Synology NAS. It comes with a fairly recent LMS package.
    • If you want a NAS, but are willing to tinker a tad bit in order to get brand independence: get whatever NAS covers your other needs, cost etc., and add a Raspberry Pi3 to run LMS.
    • If you want ultimate flexibility, then go the PC/Linux route.


    I've been in all three categories over the years.

    I have been running my own PC based Linux servers at home for 15+ years. Total control, powerful, and all that. But it requires Linux skills.

    I have run Netgear ReadyNAS for about 10 years at the office, as we partnered with them a while back. Alas they have totally re-vamped their firmwares and are no longer compatible out of the box. Thus I've added a Pi3 running piCorePlayer earlier this year (and am very happy with that setup).

    And I finally bought some 2011 Synology NAS to investigate Spotty compatibility issues a few months ago. And I was blown away by its features and ease of use. And the fact that it still is getting regular firmware updates.

    There's no single true answer. It all depends on what you want.
    Michael

    http://www.herger.net/slim-plugins - Spotty, MusicArtistInfo

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zbucklyo View Post
    I was recently in a similar situation. Netgear DUO NAS died. I bought a Synology DS218+ and have been very happy so far. Easy installation of LMS, the user interface is far superior to Netgear. I'm not a techie, so the Raspberry Pi solution recommended by others would have been beyond me.
    Yes, probably cool soloution, but sounds like lot of job Easier with a NAS I guess

  4. #14
    Senior Member iPhone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mherger View Post
    Wow... a lot has been written. Some confusing, some helpful, some plain wrong. So here's my suggestion(s).

    • If you want a system which just works without fuzzing around: get a Synology NAS. It comes with a fairly recent LMS package.
    • If you want a NAS, but are willing to tinker a tad bit in order to get brand independence: get whatever NAS covers your other needs, cost etc., and add a Raspberry Pi3 to run LMS.
    • If you want ultimate flexibility, then go the PC/Linux route.


    I've been in all three categories over the years.

    I have been running my own PC based Linux servers at home for 15+ years. Total control, powerful, and all that. But it requires Linux skills.

    I have run Netgear ReadyNAS for about 10 years at the office, as we partnered with them a while back. Alas they have totally re-vamped their firmwares and are no longer compatible out of the box. Thus I've added a Pi3 running piCorePlayer earlier this year (and am very happy with that setup).

    And I finally bought some 2011 Synology NAS to investigate Spotty compatibility issues a few months ago. And I was blown away by its features and ease of use. And the fact that it still is getting regular firmware updates.

    There's no single true answer. It all depends on what you want.
    .
    .
    That last sentence says it all, depends on what you want plus what you ultimately want to get out of your Server/NAS.

    Michael is the guru when it comes to this and like him, I have been running Linux since Vortexbox version 0.9. I agree Linux is the total package and most powerful, plus I agree if you build a server and just put a Linux Distro on it, one needs to "Know" Linux. But here is where I see an option my mentor might be overlooking: Vortexbox
    Vortexbox uses Fedora Linux as its base, but it is designed to run both LMS and PLEX with minimum or even no user knowledge of Linux. Basically the best of both world, the power of Linux but with the set it up and forget it of an NAS. Can it do more things if one knows or learns Linux, yes. But knowing Linux is not required. All that is needed is the ability to flash an image on a USB Thumb drive (simple instructions provided) and use the flash drive on a target PC/Server, and the USB does the rest. Vortexbox has a GUI for EVERYTHING else, no Linux needed. My parents and even my blonde sister are running LMS servers with Vortexbox. It is worth a look if an NAS has been a pain or you want more power for less money and can flash a USB Thumb Drive.

    www.vortexbox.org

    And yes I am a big fan of Vortexbox. For a few years I used it as is using only the GUI. I now have learned some Linux following the Vortexbox Community with line by line step by step instructions to add things I thought I would never use, but now can't think how I would do without them. PLEX LMS BLISS Auto-ripping CDs & Blu-rays Tonido Auto-Backup
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by iPhone View Post
    .
    .
    That last sentence says it all, depends on what you want plus what you ultimately want to get out of your Server/NAS.

    Michael is the guru when it comes to this and like him, I have been running Linux since Vortexbox version 0.9. I agree Linux is the total package and most powerful, plus I agree if you build a server and just put a Linux Distro on it, one needs to "Know" Linux. But here is where I see an option my mentor might be overlooking: Vortexbox
    Vortexbox uses Fedora Linux as its base, but it is designed to run both LMS and PLEX with minimum or even no user knowledge of Linux. Basically the best of both world, the power of Linux but with the set it up and forget it of an NAS. Can it do more things if one knows or learns Linux, yes. But knowing Linux is not required. All that is needed is the ability to flash an image on a USB Thumb drive (simple instructions provided) and use the flash drive on a target PC/Server, and the USB does the rest. Vortexbox has a GUI for EVERYTHING else, no Linux needed. My parents and even my blonde sister are running LMS servers with Vortexbox. It is worth a look if an NAS has been a pain or you want more power for less money and can flash a USB Thumb Drive.

    www.vortexbox.org

    And yes I am a big fan of Vortexbox. For a few years I used it as is using only the GUI. I now have learned some Linux following the Vortexbox Community with line by line step by step instructions to add things I thought I would never use, but now can't think how I would do without them. PLEX LMS BLISS Auto-ripping CDs & Blu-rays Tonido Auto-Backup
    I like Vortexbox too. I ran LMS on it for years - I hacked it so that CDs etc were ripped straight to my NAS and LMS read the NAS for the files - but I don't run LMS on it anymore - mine is a VB2.3 which won't run Spotty. I still use it for ripping straight to my NAS and occiasionally for Plex (files also on NAS).
    I thought about building a new one with VB2.4 but decided against it as the lead developer seems reluctant to issue regular updates of LMS. You can update manually from the nightly repo but then you break its ability to update itself. The Fedora its built with is also ancient by todays standards and the regular failures of the Forum server don't inspire confidence.
    That said I agree that if you want a self contained single box solution and don't want to be leading edge with the version of LMS you run then it is a very good use of an old PC and should be a definite option for a Linux newbie.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member spile's Avatar
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    I am successfully running LMS on a Qnap NAS in a container. The Qnap is a lovely server that suits my needs and works well in conjunction with my Touch. All music is in Flac format and backed up to the cloud using Qnap backup utility. The container makes the process quick and easy.

  7. #17
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    Synology Diskstation 716+ 8GB RAM runs Squeeyebox server without any issue

    I don┤t quite understand some of the negative comments regarding the usage of a NAS to run the Squeezebox server.
    Let me tell you my setup and experience.

    I have got a Synology DS716+ with 2 4GB Toshiba drives. I have upgraded the ram to 8GB which is not officially supported by Synology but works like a charm.
    On the Diskstation I am running Squeezeserver, Surveillance Station with 2 cameras, Photostation (managing 1000s of photos), Videostation, a VPN server and a lot of additional small apps.

    My Squeezeserver is hosting about 35.000 MP3s which I am streaming to ~4 Squeezeboxes (Radio, Boom, Squeezelite as service on a PC and laptop, several Android clients).

    And let me tell you what: it runs like a charm.

    There are no hiccups, no delays and certainly no problems.
    Just the other night I upgraded to the Beta 7.9.1 version and this one is also running without any issues.

    So from that end I really cannot understand OR confirm any of the negative reactions regarding running the server on a NAS. Maybe other models have problems and I cannot comment on that.

    I would look it at from various angles.

    What do you want to achieve?

    If it is ONLY streaming music then any solution with a USB disk and a Raspberry Pi might be better/equal and obviously much cheaper.
    If you are data paranoid as I am, then you would probably want to some kind of insurance that your files won┬┤t disappear when one of the hard drives crashes. When I was still using another brand that had happened to me a couple of times but since I switched to Toshiba everything is stable. In any case I am making an external backup every night. But even before, the RAID functionality of the Diskstation ensured that nothing was lost.
    If you want to run some additional stuff then a NAS is the perfect solution, in my opinion.

    Maybe different models behave VERY differently so that might be a thing to check upfront. If you go with the DS 716+ I would be surprised if you run in any trouble.


    Hope this helps a bit.

    Cheers

    Merc

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