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Suggestions for Squeezebox player replacement for a non-techie longtime SB user

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  • Goodsounds
    replied
    Thanks to all for the comments and suggestions, I'll try to catch up:

    -I don't synchronize players
    -It's not a question of fear or trepidation about putting together a little gizmo like a Raspberry Pi, it's that I have no interest in doing so. I'll configure LMS and add plugins as required but otherwise, I want no other tasks to do beyond putting a power cord into a wall socket and connecting audio cables.
    -I have in mind a network audio receiver like a Touch, to connect to existing sound equipment if and when my Squeezebox devices die, but connectible powered speakers might be useful in addition.
    -The Raspiaudio Muse Mn looks interesting, but I can't find it for sale anywhere.

    In addition, or instead, it may be that the Airplay world might be a good direction to consider. It's an ecosystem I'm unfamiliar with but your comments have led me to consider Airplay enabled speakers or receiving devices like the Belkin Soundform Connect or something similar by Andover Audio. The same idea as the Raspiaudio Muse but using Airplay for the transport.

    Any further ideas are welcome, I think I have a good starting point. Thanks again, there's such a wealth of knowledge and technical expertise to draw on with this system, that's what keeps me interested and connected as need be. Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • TomAmes
    replied
    Originally posted by GeeJay View Post
    I am not a techie. Have no Linux knowledge at all. Don’t have time to tinker, but figured I’d at least give a raspberry pi a shot while I own a workable SB Touch.

    After getting over the initial fear I bought a kit with a case, and located the instructions on this site for how to load squeezelite. I can’t recall if it worked flawlessly the first time I turned it on, but I did get it to work. In the past 2-3 years since I bought it I may have have to reboot it twice. It works flawlessly.

    As for multi-room, I decided to ditch the synchronized multi-SB setup I used to have and started buying Denon HEOS speakers and a Marantz HEOS-enabled network streamer. I was already going to upgrade my stereo so that money was going to be spent anyway. Synchronization is much better than my old multi-SB network of players.

    The lesson here is don’t rule out the Pi if you can’t find something else that fits your needs. The hardest part, frankly, is getting over the fear factor that you’re going to spend months having to figure out how to make it work when it really doesn’t take that long once you commit to it.
    +1
    I went through the same process with the Pi. And faced the same trepidations. I bumbled my way through so happily that I now have three Pi players in addition to my Boom. I could not be happier with them.

    There is some assembly required and some relatively basic downloading and configuring involved, but none require handyman or programming skills. I got a little frustrated in the process, but members of this forum helped walk me through the initial issues I was having.

    Leave a comment:


  • Redrum
    replied
    There is also Philippe's Squeezeamp. Just connect a pair of speaker, or use the SPDIF out. He just built another batch and I think is starting to send them out. You could contact him to see if he has any not spoken for



    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • bpa
    replied
    Originally posted by Goodsounds View Post
    The discontinued Chromecast Audio device I referred to has a 3.5mm audio out socket that can be connected to an amp or powered speakers with analog RCA cables.
    The Chromecast Audio 3.5mm socket also supports a digital connection using a mini TOS link cable.

    You could look at Raspiaudio Muse Mn - with SqueezeESP installed, a true SB player which has digital and analog outputs.

    Leave a comment:


  • agbagb
    replied
    Question for the OP....... Do you have / want / need a network audio receiver like Touch or Duet or Transporter, which feeds a separate audio set up? Or a stand-alone piece of kit, like Radio or Boom, with its own speakers?

    Leave a comment:


  • oldfolkie
    replied
    There are rumors that Google may be developing a replacement for the Chromecast Audio, one of the greatest discontinued audio devices of all time. I have two and, with the Chromecast plugin, they work great. Regular Chromecasts also work for audio casting but, yes, you would need an HDMI input. I have no idea how well a converter device would work.

    I also bought a Pi, but to host the LMS Server. I just installed Max2Play on it, which automatically comes with Squeezebox Server. It can also be used as a player. The hardest part was figuring out the proper Mount syntax for my music, which is stored on a NAS (I also don't know Linux).

    Leave a comment:


  • GeeJay
    replied
    I am not a techie. Have no Linux knowledge at all. Don’t have time to tinker, but figured I’d at least give a raspberry pi a shot while I own a workable SB Touch.

    After getting over the initial fear I bought a kit with a case, and located the instructions on this site for how to load squeezelite. I can’t recall if it worked flawlessly the first time I turned it on, but I did get it to work. In the past 2-3 years since I bought it I may have have to reboot it twice. It works flawlessly.

    As for multi-room, I decided to ditch the synchronized multi-SB setup I used to have and started buying Denon HEOS speakers and a Marantz HEOS-enabled network streamer. I was already going to upgrade my stereo so that money was going to be spent anyway. Synchronization is much better than my old multi-SB network of players.

    The lesson here is don’t rule out the Pi if you can’t find something else that fits your needs. The hardest part, frankly, is getting over the fear factor that you’re going to spend months having to figure out how to make it work when it really doesn’t take that long once you commit to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • RobbH
    replied
    One more note about the Chromecast bridge: I think it allows you to synchronize players at startup, but it cannot maintain sync after that. If you have two or more players playing the same thing, but far enough apart that they do not audibly overlap, this might be sufficient.

    Leave a comment:


  • RobbH
    replied
    Originally posted by Goodsounds View Post
    ....I've managed to buy a few spare players used through EBay, some of which have already been put into service. My "collection" is 4 devices in use at my primary residence and 2 at a second home.

    Thinking forward to the day when used players in reasonable condition will no longer be available, what recommendations are there for ersatz Squeezebox players that are convenient, have a small form factor, produce acceptable sound and are as close to plug and play as the originals? I don't want anything requiring a screwdriver, the assembly of parts (even if they come in a kit), the need for hands-on usage on my part of Linux anything, or the like. Is the easiest path forward simply something like a small Android device with the player app running and output through the headphones socket? Awkward but functional, something I could manage but maybe more than my wife would want to use regularly. Or trying to find used Chromecast Audio devices that I know can be streamed to with a plugin?

    Thanks in advance
    Do you ever synchronize players, and if so, is being able to do that important to you? If so, that is not a feature of the Chromecast bridge. It is possible to use Airplay speakers with the Airplay bridge, and they can be synchronized. But sometimes setting up Airplay speakers can be tricky, so this option may not be sufficiently plug-and-play.

    Android devices can be used as players. I don't know if it's safe to assume the headphone output is likely to provide better audio quality than bluetooth, though. Just be sure your Android device has access to the Google Play Store.

    Leave a comment:


  • castalla
    replied
    Originally posted by Goodsounds View Post
    No doubt my knowledge is incomplete or wrong, but here's what I understand:

    The current Chromecast Video dongle (a competitor to Roku, Firestick, etc) is a portal to connect streaming video sources (Netflix, Prime, Youtube TV, Hulu). Its output is HDMI, to connect to a TV. My legacy audio equipment doesn't have HDMI inputs.

    The discontinued Chromecast Audio device I referred to has a 3.5mm audio out socket that can be connected to an amp or powered speakers with analog RCA cables.

    Bluetooth has limited bandwidth not suitable for mid-level audio quality.

    Maybe you're suggesting using an HDMI to RCA converter, that could connect an HDMI signal (from the video Chromecast device) to RCA inputs in a powered speaker or amp? That's a wrinkle I hadn't thought of. Will that work satisfactorily? I see such converters on Amazon.
    Sorry - no idea about converters. An alternative could be an audio dongle with airplay (and use airplay bridge plugin)

    Leave a comment:


  • Goodsounds
    replied
    No doubt my knowledge is incomplete or wrong, but here's what I understand:

    The current Chromecast Video dongle (a competitor to Roku, Firestick, etc) is a portal to connect streaming video sources (Netflix, Prime, Youtube TV, Hulu). Its output is HDMI, to connect to a TV. My legacy audio equipment doesn't have HDMI inputs.

    The discontinued Chromecast Audio device I referred to has a 3.5mm audio out socket that can be connected to an amp or powered speakers with analog RCA cables.

    Bluetooth has limited bandwidth not suitable for mid-level audio quality.

    Maybe you're suggesting using an HDMI to RCA converter, that could connect an HDMI signal (from the video Chromecast device) to RCA inputs in a powered speaker or amp? That's a wrinkle I hadn't thought of. Will that work satisfactorily? I see such converters on Amazon.

    Leave a comment:


  • castalla
    replied
    Originally posted by Goodsounds View Post
    I've been a Squeezebox user for a long time, dating back to my first player, an SB3, that I picked up in person at the Slim Devices office in Mountain View, CA.

    I've managed to buy a few spare players used through EBay, some of which have already been put into service. My "collection" is 4 devices in use at my primary residence and 2 at a second home.

    Thinking forward to the day when used players in reasonable condition will no longer be available, what recommendations are there for ersatz Squeezebox players that are convenient, have a small form factor, produce acceptable sound and are as close to plug and play as the originals? I don't want anything requiring a screwdriver, the assembly of parts (even if they come in a kit), the need for hands-on usage on my part of Linux anything, or the like. Is the easiest path forward simply something like a small Android device with the player app running and output through the headphones socket? Awkward but functional, something I could manage but maybe more than my wife would want to use regularly. Or trying to find used Chromecast Audio devices that I know can be streamed to with a plugin?

    Thanks in advance
    Android tv sticks have chromecast. You need to use Bluetooth to a speaker/headphone otherwise sound goes to TV.

    Leave a comment:


  • Suggestions for Squeezebox player replacement for a non-techie longtime SB user

    I've been a Squeezebox user for a long time, dating back to my first player, an SB3, that I picked up in person at the Slim Devices office in Mountain View, CA.

    I've managed to buy a few spare players used through EBay, some of which have already been put into service. My "collection" is 4 devices in use at my primary residence and 2 at a second home.

    Thinking forward to the day when used players in reasonable condition will no longer be available, what recommendations are there for ersatz Squeezebox players that are convenient, have a small form factor, produce acceptable sound and are as close to plug and play as the originals? I don't want anything requiring a screwdriver, the assembly of parts (even if they come in a kit), the need for hands-on usage on my part of Linux anything, or the like. Is the easiest path forward simply something like a small Android device with the player app running and output through the headphones socket? Awkward but functional, something I could manage but maybe more than my wife would want to use regularly. Or trying to find used Chromecast Audio devices that I know can be streamed to with a plugin?

    Thanks in advance
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