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View Full Version : What a time to launch a new SqueezeBox based product.



nicklouse
2012-08-31, 05:40
http://www.electronichouse.com/article/fusion_research_to_unveil_music_server_built_off_l ogitechs_squeezebox/#When:13:18:17Z


Long known for its movie servers, Fusion will debut the Ovation Music Streamer for streaming music to as many as five zones.

For this product, Fusion didn’t reinvent the wheel. Rather, the company built this box around the popular Squeezebox audio system from Logitech.

“As we began architecting our own audio streamer system, we came across Squeezebox and all the other open source products built around it,” says Fusion VP of sales Ingo Schmoldt “It seemed an ideal base upon which to build because there are tons of users vetting the GUIs, and of course there are a host of free drivers and apps available for all the major automation companies and mobile devices.”

autopilot
2012-09-01, 03:21
Ouch.

Squeezemenicely
2012-09-01, 03:29
I am sure they are feeling really happy at the moment.

autopilot
2012-09-01, 03:31
A think a few other companies make similar products too.

Do they have some sort of licensing deal with Logitech?

I wonder if companies like this could actually help keep the SB alive in some way?

Osamede
2012-09-04, 13:45
Actually since I first encountered the SB Touch, the thing I have kept wondering is why Logitech never pushed this direction more aggressively - as in having the Squeezebox receiver functionality licenced to receiver manufactuers. Or even better, actually embedding the entire thing, including touch screen and control functionality within a receiver.

It makes sense - if you look at AV receivers, they are supposed to be control units for home AV. But they all suck and their media streaming capabilties sucks even more. The gap - the opportunity - has been there. At least until they all went for so-called "Airplay".

So I could never understand why this was not happening. Until I realised that the receiver makers are even more lame than Logitech.

So it all makes sense.

JJZolx
2012-09-04, 13:57
Actually since I first encountered the SB Touch, the thing I have kept wondering is why Logitech never pushed this direction more aggressively - as in having the Squeezebox receiver functionality licenced to receiver manufactuers. Or even better, actually embedding the entire thing, including touch screen and control functionality within a receiver.

It makes sense - if you look at AV receivers, they are supposed to be control units for home AV. But they all suck and their media streaming capabilties sucks even more. The gap - the opportunity - has been there. At least until they all went for so-called "Airplay".

So I could never understand why this was not happening. Until I realised that the receiver makers are even more lame than Logitech.

The software would had to have been much more reliable for anyone else to adopt something that was dependent on Slim Server. That never happened. Slim Devices didn't have the financial resources. And Logitech spent all their time chasing their own tails, worrying about half-assed support for every second rate music service startup, and trying to get new products out the door with whatever functionality they could manage.

Imagine a customer has a problem. Probably 95+% of the time, if Squeezebox experience is any indication, it's a server problem. Who supports that? How do server problems get fixed when a receiver manufacturer is getting calls because half their customers' libraries aren't being scanned correctly.

It would have been a f***ing nightmare, and little wonder that nobody ever based a third party player product on the Squeezebox system.

dasmueller
2012-09-04, 14:00
At the price they mention I would guess these units will have small success How many are going to drop $1k on something like this ?

I do like the concept you mentioned of having a squeeezebox-type product built right into an AV Receiver.

Osamede
2012-09-05, 06:01
True that the server support needs for 3rd party would have been massive without better software. But ultimately integration into AV/Audio hardware should have been the vision, not selling standalone boxes Put it this way: even 10-15 years ago selling standalone radio tuners was a dead end market. integration had to be the game. And as the previous poster said, at reasonable price point.

wuffles
2012-10-13, 07:18
True that the server support needs for 3rd party would have been massive without better software. But ultimately integration into AV/Audio hardware should have been the vision, not selling standalone boxes Put it this way: even 10-15 years ago selling standalone radio tuners was a dead end market. integration had to be the game. And as the previous poster said, at reasonable price point.

I'm not so sure the timing of the Fusion Research product offering is an unfortunate coincidence for Fusion Research. Maybe their offering and the cancellation of the SB lineup are related.

Consider. Logitech may have had some strategy of unifying their media offerings. At least re-naming the server to LMS suggests that, as does their investment in the Harmony remote control line. The Revue may have been part of a strategy to unify electronics in the living room. Its a logical extension of the idea of "peripherals" from the PC world to home theater.

They apparently lost a great deal of money on their Google TV offering (the Revue) and may have been forced to re-focus and sharpen their product lines to shore up their balance sheet - that is, to cancel their grand vision. At the time they canceled the Revue, I was a bit surprised how bitter their execs sounded (I have a Sony Google TV and think its an OK product) .... maybe they were bitter because they felt GTV's failure killed the cornerstone of their plan to take over the living room. Its not too hard to imagine a business consultant making the following observations:

* The traditional SB devices rely on customer integration of complex systems. This will always be a small market, and with the exception of the Transporter (which wasn't refreshed during its product lifecycle, was it?), a market space with thin margins.

* There is some reason to think that sooner or later the traditional SB product line might be overshadowed (in the public's mind) by a device from Apple .... at least, this would certainly seem like a risk to a consultant. To put it another way, even a profitable niche is a risky place to be. You have to be a substantial player or risk loosing the market.

* The SBR is undoubtedly the most popular SB, and could be more popular if simplified.

So the strategy might be this:

* Re-deploy the traditional SB product line for PROFESSIONAL integration. Logitech doesn't play in this space, which would mean selling support and intellectual property to the likes of Fusion Research is the best way of moving their IP (intellectual property) into this other market space. This could explain why the Fusion devices come out the same month Logitech announced EOS (end of sale) for the traditional SB.

* Distance the SBR from the SB lineup and simplify it - hence the UER.

The one thing that doesn't make sense is that the Fusion boxes use mysb.com ... they could easily have supported another domain using the same backend s/w and h/w.

majones
2012-10-13, 14:19
So the strategy might be this:
* Re-deploy the traditional SB product line for PROFESSIONAL integration. Logitech doesn't play in this space, which would mean selling support and intellectual property to the likes of Fusion Research is the best way of moving their IP (intellectual property) into this other market space. This could explain why the Fusion devices come out the same month Logitech announced EOS (end of sale) for the traditional SB.
* Distance the SBR from the SB lineup and simplify it - hence the UER.
Makes perfect sense. I think you've nailed it.

Mnyb
2012-10-13, 20:02
I don't agree at the distance the SBR bit ? It makes no sense to me ?

In any squeezebox like system I want syncable integrated whole house audio too, so besides the more advanced unit sitting in or integrated in my main hifi I want smaller devices that could be in other rooms ,including ones with a built in speaker .

And it won't help using other devices there ( like UE ) as the system and user interfaces are not the same and they won't sync, or for example use the " other players" plugin and be able to move my playlist between different rooms...

The current Touch is good too as second zone player to with powered speakers and it's analog outs , so that is also a device needed to complete the setup for me .

However it would have made more sense to also do this of oem licensing to hifi manufacturer if the original Squeezbox range had still been in production they they all nicely complements each other .

Comercially it had a small change to work ( untill logitech discontinued the sb range, now it's dead ) if some one made a "Transporter mk2" like device .

Otherwise I agree with JJZolz here , no sane reciever brand wants this kind of support nightmare integrated .

The professional installer market ? Is this a US thing ?
In restaurants department stores, airports , shops etc it exist where I live too, but is a very small bussiness in private homes a very small niche compared to the squeezebox niche ?

Do people actually pay other people to setup things like a normal home theater reciever ?

Julf
2012-10-14, 02:15
Do people actually pay other people to setup things like a normal home theater reciever ?

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