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View Full Version : What is purpose of #EXTURL in playlist?



Swimmerbird123
2011-08-28, 12:00
I am moving my playlists (.m3u) from a headless Linux box on my network to a Windows box. Each box runs its own copy of SBS under its own operating system.

The playlists that I made on the Linux box (using its web interface from a browser on a separate Windows machine) have only two lines per playlist entry:
- an #EXTINF (with a -1 for the length and the track name)
- the track's file location with full path name under the Linux system.

The playlists that I make from scratch on the Windows box (running SBS and containing the music files) have three lines per playlist entry:
- a #EXTURL:file/// directive followed by the track's file location in what seems to be Linux format (spaces replaced by the ASCII code %20)
- a #EXTINF (with the actual length of the track and the track name)
- the track's file location in Windows format with a full path name

My question is, what does the #EXTURL directive do, and is it necessary on playlists under windows? Searching the forums brings no hits. Is it only used by SBS and only for certain configurations?

I am no longer using the Linux box and am moving all the playlists from it to the Windows machine that is running SBS. I know I have to replace all the file locations from the Linux box with their new locations on the Windows box and change the "/" to "\". My question though is, do I have to add a #EXTURL line to each entry of these playlists? They seem to work OK on the Windows box without an #EXTURL entry as long as I convert the file location. And is it important to have the proper length of th track in the #EXTINF directive?

Thanks,
Swimmer

pallfreeman
2011-08-28, 16:12
You can safely delete any lines beginning with a "#". These are comments.

SBS uses #EXTURL to be smarter, but it will regenerate it when it feels the urge.

sebp
2011-08-29, 13:13
You can safely delete any lines beginning with a "#". These are comments.

SBS uses #EXTURL to be smarter, but it will regenerate it when it feels the urge.
In some cases, when the file name contains a backslash character, for example, SBS would be able to load the files with the #EXTURL information, but not without it.

pallfreeman
2011-08-29, 15:34
In some cases, when the file name contains a backslash character, for example, SBS would be able to load the files with the #EXTURL information, but not without it.

Cunning. How would this work on Windows?

sebp
2011-08-29, 22:32
Cunning. How would this work on Windows?
Windows wouldn't let you use such characters in a file name, AFAIK.
UNIX-like systems are much more tolerant in this regard, they'll let you use quite any character.

There's an open bug report somewhere for this problem, BTW.