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View Full Version : Why do you continue to use your Squeezebox ?



erland
2011-07-21, 03:51
Related to the other poll I posted, I'd also like to ask all existing Squeezebox owners for the main reasons why you continue to use the Squeezebox system as your main system for music listening and doesn't switch to something else.

I'd like to you take the whole functionality into account, both what's provided by Logitech and what's provided by third party plugins.

So, what's the main reason you don't switch your Squeezebox to something else ?

For those interested, the other polls related are these:
http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=89397
http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=88915
http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=88939

jonn68
2011-07-21, 05:06
I am satisfied with my SB3 and Boom, the music quality is very good, for better quality you must pay a lot of more money like naim or linn.
The most important argument for a squeezebox is the SBS, a lot of better than dlna... imho.

jonn

Phil Leigh
2011-07-21, 05:15
SBS is great (despite its "quirks"). SB sound quality is really very, very good. Price/performance ratio is excellent.

DLNA+generic client = no thanks!

aubuti
2011-07-21, 06:27
For me, the SB system Just Works (tm) 99+% of the time. Every now and then there are glitches, but most of the posts I see here about connectivity problems, scanner problems, etc are completely foreign to me (knock wood). In my view, SB is a remarkably inexpensive way to do whole-house audio, mixing my local library with internet radio and services like Pandora, Napster, Spotify, etc. And while it does take some know-how for basic maintenance (ripping, tagging, updates, etc), it's not hard for a non-techie end-user to grok. And the sound quality is good enough that I'm pretty sure SBs are not the weakest links in my audio chain.

I'm fortunate that I don't have a lot of sunk costs in SB equipment, as I've only paid for 3 of my SBs (1 new SB3 and 2 second-hand SB2s). The rest is courtesy of the hardware beta programs. So I wouldn't take a big financial hit by switching to something else, but why go to Sonos or other systems when what I have works fine? And I like the idea that even if Logitech pulled the plug tomorrow, the current SBS would work with my SBs, at least for my local collection, for a long time to come.

Third party plugins are a really nice plus, and I'm amazed at how many of them I use. But they're not a deciding factor for me in keeping/dropping my SB system.
.

garym
2011-07-21, 06:44
For me, the SB system Just Works (tm) 99+% of the time. Every now and then there are glitches, but most of the posts I see here about connectivity problems, scanner problems, etc are completely foreign to me (knock wood). In my view, SB is a remarkably inexpensive way to do whole-house audio, mixing my local library with internet radio and services like Pandora, Napster, Spotify, etc. And while it does take some know-how for basic maintenance (ripping, tagging, updates, etc), it's not hard for a non-techie end-user to grok. And the sound quality is good enough that I'm pretty sure SBs are not the weakest links in my audio chain.
.

+1 on all this, except I KNOW FOR SURE that SB players are not the weakest link in my audio chain. Speakers/placement and WAF are the weakest links.

rayman1701
2011-07-21, 07:29
For me, the SB system Just Works (tm) 99+% of the time.
.

+2 on this! In the 15 months since I've gotten my Touch I've listened to more of my music than I had for probably the previous 5-7 years combined! Even with 2 400 disc changers it was just clunky to listen to anything more than one or two discs a session. And then the total pain it was to update and rotate stuff out of the 400 disc changers when I got new stuff, and typing up an index key so I knew which slot the discs were in, was such a pain especially with my health and mobility problems. Now I am listening to stuff every night while I sleep and all day long on the weekends and it is awesome to really enjoy my 3500+ (and still growing) CD collection.

I know that some people have issues. But for me not knowing anything about Squeezebox at all when I got my Touch, I've had very few minor issues. Are there some quirks here and there, yes, but most things these days have quirks. I appreciate this forum for sharing solutions for those quirks as well as major issues one might have.

Ikabob
2011-07-21, 07:42
I literally LOVE my Squeezebox eco-system (and that love has lasted 3 years so far). It has changed my life and that of my wife's. We enjoy the music services and the music that we can enjoy throughout the house. The sound quality is very top quality. The forums and all my friends here have helped me get the most out of the /squeezeboxes.The various plugins(Spotify,etc. and Ipeng) are integral parts to this Squeezebox eco-system. I also appreciate being able to connect via internet radio with many many athletic events (football and basketball games) around the US...games which I would never be able to listen to without the Logitech Squeezie. Unfortunately, I enjoy the Squeezies so much that it has encroached upon my exercise routine and I am gaining weight. :-(

I really am looking forward to a Boom2. I hope it is in the future.

Nostromo
2011-07-21, 08:02
I love my Squeezebox 3! I'll change it if it dies on me, but if it does I'll probably get another Squeezebox product, unless there's something clearly superior out here. But if it exists, I haven't heard about it.

Eric Seaberg
2011-07-21, 08:16
I've got 2-SB3s and a Transporter at home, as well as iPing on my iPhone and Pad. Like another poster above, since setting up my system 5 years ago, I've listened to more music than I did the previous 10-15 years.

I also rip and/or re-encode my DVD-Audio and SACD discs, allowing me to play high-resolution 5.1 mixes on my Transporter.

Although I couldn't check multiple items on the VOTE, I also appreciate all of the 3rd party plugs, as well as the HUGE amount of support from this group. If SqueezeServer does go away, I will continue using it as it is until it dies.

w3wilkes
2011-07-21, 08:22
The Duet was the only SB product that I even considered. I'm also pleased with Squeezebox server, never use MySB.com. I have no Pads or smart phone so the Duet controller is a "must have" for me. On the server I remove a bunch of pluggins that Logitech has active by default, but do use Custom Browse, Dynamic Playlists and SQL Playlist.

For the most part I've had no trouble with the Duet, but when it does have connectivity issues it can be a real PITA! I would not recommend a Duet to most of the people I know due to these occasional problems.

brucegrr
2011-07-21, 11:29
We have a Squeezebox classic and a Boom. We are completely satisfied with our Squeezebox system. All the players and the server are hardwired. (eliminating any wifi issues.)

It works and that is what I want. I want to turn it on and listen to music, podcasts,etc. I want a system that is easy for my wife to use.

We have been using Squeezebox devices since 2005. We are happy.Ipeng made us more than happy. Now we can use an iPad to control everything.

I have plenty of hassles in life. I am glad Squeezebox is not one of them.

Kuben72
2011-07-21, 14:42
I bought my first SB (duet) in 2007 and have bought 5 SB's more since, so now we have one in every room in the house.
And it just works. Every time I think of something new I want it to do I have always been able to find a plugin that could do the trick for me.
I read a lot about problems with the systems in here, but I practically never have any my self.
So for me and my wife this is a system that brings us joy every day.
Music at our fingertips. It has never been easier. :)

Pank
2011-07-21, 14:54
Erland,
I was pretty close to 'Stallman' on you, but managed myself.

Third party plugins is a consequence of the development model of Squeezebox. This is the most important point to me.

Is there any other software which is this hacker-friendly?

boatnanny
2011-07-21, 17:52
I started using SQUEEZEBOX with slimserver about 5 years ago,using my ITUNES library as the music source,the only drawback was having to have my laptop on to listen.
Enter VORTEXBOX with its superior FLAC support there was no way I would use anything else.
Add IPENG to control it and you have one of the most capable multi room music systems around and all at an affordable price.
I would rate this set up on par with SOOLOOS the only part missing is SOOLOOS amathing touch screen interface, but i can live without that.

vrette
2011-07-21, 19:07
I had an Olive 4 with the Melody 2 player, but became dissatisfied with their closed, proprietary approach (even though it is largely Linux based). I looked into DLNA, but find the "standards" to be weak, and hence compatibility and interoperability suffers. I could never get any of my supposedly DLNA compatible gear and software to play nice together to my satisfaction.

I had an SB3 before the Olive, so I was familiar with the Squeezebox approach. The added capabilities of the Touch and Radios was just icing for the cake. I have never listened to so much of my own music library in the house since buying the Touches and Radios. A Touch with a DacMagic was a good replacement for the Olive 4 on my 2 channel system.

I realized the Squeezebox is not the best option for everyone. I've been building my own computers for over 15 years, so some of the software and hardware "challenges" don't bother me. Overall I'm really happy with my system, and would be at a loss as to what to replace it with if the product line and support faded away.

Muele
2011-07-22, 01:47
Besides local control that I mention in the other thread, "one" thing is really great for me:

It solves (or at least is part of the solution to) ALL of my music needs. Hmmm.. come to think of it, the cars are the exeption (so far).

Music in just about every room at home. Outside when needed, batterypowered. Remotely: on work on I stream to my pc with softsqueeze. On camping earlier this summer I brought a Radio and enabled the wifi-access point on my phone, and BAM all my music available. I can stream to my phone, but mostly I just use Squeezecommander to download the albums I want to listen to via Wifi before leaving. If my local neighbourghood had better mobile coverage I probalby wouldn't bother downloading it but just stream.

I sincerely believe there exists no alternative that can do all this.

I know Sonos can't. Recently a Sonos-user on a Danish AV-site wanted to stream his music while on vacation. He ended up enabling SBS on his NAS and accessing it remotely with iPeng for iPad. I think he was pretty happy about it.

JJZolx
2011-07-22, 02:06
Related to the other poll I posted, I'd also like to ask all existing Squeezebox owners for the main reasons why you continue to use the Squeezebox system as your main system for music listening and doesn't switch to something else.

What makes you think that existing users use the Squeezebox system as their "main" system for music listening? If that's your premise, then the poll is a little flawed.

I would say my reason for using Squeezebox is that years ago, before I'd ever even heard about Squeezebox, I envisioned a system where you'd have a music library on a central network server and that this server would feed music to players on the network. I then discovered that Squeezebox worked exactly like this. The web interface was also a very key component, as it enabled web clients from anywhere on the network to control any player on the network.

To be honest, while I think plugin capability is a wonderful addition, it's something that I don't use at all. I've found that any plugin introduced adds a degree of instability to the server, no matter how careful your are, and no matter how few you use. I disable all but a very small handful of built-in plugins and it keeps the server rock solid.

lintweaker
2011-07-22, 02:07
I am relatively new to the squeezebox game (couple of months). I am happily using two touches with the squeezeboxserver running on my Linux server. I do think that Logitech has to improve on QA before releasing software, the last 7.5.5 update is a complete mess on Linux.

Ron Olsen
2011-07-22, 07:06
I am relatively new to the squeezebox game (couple of months). I am happily using two touches with the squeezeboxserver running on my Linux server. I do think that Logitech has to improve on QA before releasing software, the last 7.5.5 update is a complete mess on Linux.

Logitech botched both the 7.5.4 and 7.5.5 releases. Those responsible need to look at fixing the QA and Release Planning processes. However, given the apparent low priority Logitech is giving to the SqueezeBox line, I hold little hope that this will get significantly better.

It's hard to recommend a product to others when the company behind the product has such a shoddy record of software updates, requiring users to jump through hoops to get things working. Truly inexcusable performance from a major company like Logitech.

Things like this don't happen at Apple. The latest OS X update to Lion went very smoothly on my Mac. Logitech could learn some lessons from Apple to see how software updates should be done. Lots of beta testing before the release is a major factor. Maybe SBS 7.6 will be better, since there is major community involvement in beta testing. I certainly hope so.

RiccardoR
2011-07-22, 10:01
For me the reason of the success of Squeezebox System is that each one declines it to suit their needs/tastes.

Side Squeezecenter: from NAS to server (as little as my Dockstar), second hand PC or none at all (my sister use a Boom only to hear German Radio as she teach German Literature!!); for someone are fundamental many plugins (for me only Music Information screen & Superdatetime)

Side Players: I have both Classic/Receiver plugged to main audio sistems and three Boom around bedroom, bath and kitchen. Someone has the Transporter with high end audio system, someone only Squeezebox Radio.

Side Music? Everyone (E V E R Y O N E!) says of a new music listening experience! More music, more time spent to listen, rediscovery of stolen CD's, ecc. A thing for me fundamental is the search function: how many different version of "Summertime" I have? 32: how much time to find them all through my whole CD collection?

So, enjoy SB (I hope forever) and sorry for my english ;-)!

P.S.: "The Nearness of You": 13
"Santa Claus Is Coming To Town": 27! and so on...

Percival Sweetwater
2011-07-22, 14:18
For a small piece of plastic that doesn't even run warm, my Touch is a wonderful bit of kit. I used to have a Squeezebox Mk1 that I bought off eBay, for many years, but the sound quality and flexibility of the Touch is top notch. Can't really fault it; it even makes a very attractive clock when it's not on. I've ripped all of my CDs, and some vinyl to a 1TB hard disc that sits next to a Sheevaplug running Squeezebox server, under the TV.

However, if I wasn't a qualified engineer and a bit of a computer geek, I don't think I would have the whole system up and running so nicely.

mlsstl
2011-07-22, 14:40
Logitech botched both the 7.5.4 and 7.5.5 releases. Those responsible need to look at fixing the QA and Release Planning processes. However, given the apparent low priority Logitech is giving to the SqueezeBox line, I hold little hope that this will get significantly better.

It's hard to recommend a product to others when the company behind the product has such a shoddy record of software updates, requiring users to jump through hoops to get things working. Truly inexcusable performance from a major company like Logitech.

Things like this don't happen at Apple. The latest OS X update to Lion went very smoothly on my Mac. Logitech could learn some lessons from Apple to see how software updates should be done. Lots of beta testing before the release is a major factor. Maybe SBS 7.6 will be better, since there is major community involvement in beta testing. I certainly hope so.

The Apple comparison is a rather unfair, IMO. It is certainly a lot easier for a manufacturer when they control every single aspect of hardware and operating system design. Their monopoly control is also reflected in their prices - no complaint, but just a realistic acknowledgment.

Squeezebox software, on the other hand, has to run on an incrediblely varied range of hardware using various Windows versions, multiple Linux flavors, NAS boxes, FreeBSD as well as Apple.

I've always been rather impressed they are willing to even try to accommodate all of those options.

That said, I've had zero difficulties with SBS 7.5.4 and 7.5.5. Both installed flawlessly on my Linux Fedora Core box and have been problem-free.

Ron Olsen
2011-07-22, 15:45
That said, I've had zero difficulties with SBS 7.5.4 and 7.5.5. Both installed flawlessly on my Linux Fedora Core box and have been problem-free.

I guess you forgot the fact that mysqueezebox.com was upgraded to 7.5.4 two weeks before SBS 7.5.4 was released, resulting in firmware upgrade/downgrade issues for those using both mysqueezebox.com and a local SBS server.

Also, SBS 7.5.5 did not run at all on Fedora 14 due to a screw up in the CPAN libraries that has since been fixed. Many other Linux platforms were similarly affected.

Count yourself lucky that SBS 7.5.4 and 7.5.5 worked for you with no problems.

Inadequate release planning in 7.5.4, and inadequate beta/QA testing in 7.5.5 indicate problems in how Logitech manages the SBS release process. At least they have users beta testing SBS 7.6.

Yes; the Apple comparison is unfair; like comparing apples to lemons. However, Linux distributions have to run on a variety of hardware, and all of the distros have proper beta testing/QA testing/release plans in place to ensure smooth upgrades. Logitech should do the same.

mlsstl
2011-07-22, 19:27
I guess you forgot the fact that mysqueezebox.com was upgraded to 7.5.4 two weeks before SBS 7.5.4 was released, resulting in firmware upgrade/downgrade issues for those using both mysqueezebox.com and a local SBS server.

Also, SBS 7.5.5 did not run at all on Fedora 14 due to a screw up in the CPAN libraries that has since been fixed. Many other Linux platforms were similarly affected.

Count yourself lucky that SBS 7.5.4 and 7.5.5 worked for you with no problems.

Inadequate release planning in 7.5.4, and inadequate beta/QA testing in 7.5.5 indicate problems in how Logitech manages the SBS release process. At least they have users beta testing SBS 7.6.

Yes; the Apple comparison is unfair; like comparing apples to lemons. However, Linux distributions have to run on a variety of hardware, and all of the distros have proper beta testing/QA testing/release plans in place to ensure smooth upgrades. Logitech should do the same.

No real interest in sustaining a debate on the issue, but even Apple screws up every now and then, even with their absolute control over all aspects of their system. Examples aren't too hard to find - a Google search of "apple os problems" returns 167 million hits.

And, as a long-time Fedora Core user (dating back to Red Hat 6), the FC14 issue was Fedora's arbitrary change out of the blue. I've had all kinds of interesting problems with Linux and hardware configurations over the years.

Of all the software I run on my Linux boxes, SBS and its predecessors have installed and run more reliably for me than any other program that didn't come with the FC install package.

I'd agree that Logitech's level of commitment doesn't quite match that of Slimdevices (and the products have certainly become more complex since the old days) but overall, I'd give Logitech a "B". As teachers used to say, I don't think they're working to their full potential, but overall, not too bad. Sorry you feel otherwise. There are always competitors who'll be glad to sell you their system. ;-)

GeeJay
2011-07-22, 22:20
Every so often I check out the competition to see if they have yet decided to invest in software that is as flexible as what Squeezebox offers. They haven't. As long as Logitech and this community supports the product, I will be a happy and loyal customer.

ModelCitizen
2011-07-23, 00:37
even Apple screws up every now and then The first release of iTunes I installed automatically "managed" my music library by default. It renamed every file and created its own directory structure to put them in. The Squeezebox system has never come close to causing heartache anything like that.

Before anyone says otherwise, the very early iTunes (or at least one early release) did not have any option on install to turn off the management of your library and "managing" your library was part of the install.

epoch1970
2011-07-23, 09:03
I think "Logitech Squeezebox" is dead. I have at home SB3s and Boom, and have equipped friends&family with the same (+ a server I whipped up.) They're working great (except for the irritating firmware upgrades merely required by evolutions on mySB.com that I have to manage for them.)
I had a Duet from day 1, and it was a disaster. 2 years later it was still. What I hear from the other products isn't all that good either.
In 2 or 3 years Logitech hasn't deployed any compelling music service over the internet. No store, no liner notes, live events, concert tickets zilch.

I can't recommend the system to anyone I know now, because I don't trust/value the available new hardware, and the software doesn't make progress. Hearing about video support makes me shudder.
I hope the Apple Airplay solution gets cheaper over time; that would be something easy to recommend.

For me I still invest in the system but I have to buy 2nd-hand SB3s on Ebay, and I run an old version (the oldest I can) of the server. I'm getting "Slim Devices squeezeboxes" second hand, they run cheaper! (and they look better)
I expect a community fork will finally happen for the server and hope for community ip3k firmwares as well.

(No need to tell me I am so wrong on such or such account. This is my opinion.)

johnas
2011-07-23, 11:47
There are always competitors who'll be glad to sell you their system. ;-)

And its not like the competitors don't have their own issues. Sonos won't work with OSX 10.7 for four weeks:

http://forums.sonos.com/showthread.php?t=23442

MediaCenter
2011-07-23, 13:36
There is nothing like it, an open source platform that grows with your needs. These days everybody is releasing music streamers even the audiophile boutique bands are all over it. This proves that the transporter is well ahead of it's time. Logitech should consider releasing another version that looks good in a rack, can do 24/192 on spdif and USB and enjoy the domination for the next five years.

What most manufacturer didn't get is that you don't want computer connected to your audio system, but an extension of computer that is easy to use and simple yet with the remote server you can achieve anything you want. The perfect example is DRC, one do advance processing that was not even conceived at the time development but added later.

This platform never looses the IT factor, I can tinker as much as I want, yet if I don't, it still amazes me with it's flexibility and simplicity

rcstevensonaz
2011-07-23, 22:28
I think "Logitech Squeezebox" is dead. I have at home SB3s and Boom, and have equipped friends&family with the same (+ a server I whipped up.) They're working great (except for the irritating firmware upgrades merely required by evolutions on mySB.com that I have to manage for them.)
I had a Duet from day 1, and it was a disaster. 2 years later it was still. What I hear from the other products isn't all that good either.
In 2 or 3 years Logitech hasn't deployed any compelling music service over the internet. No store, no liner notes, live events, concert tickets … zilch.

I can't recommend the system to anyone I know now, because I don't trust/value the available new hardware, and the software doesn't make progress. Hearing about video support makes me shudder.
I hope the Apple Airplay solution gets cheaper over time; that would be something easy to recommend.

For me I still invest in the system but I have to buy 2nd-hand SB3s on Ebay, and I run an old version (the oldest I can) of the server. I'm getting "Slim Devices squeezeboxes" second hand, they run cheaper! (and they look better)
I expect a community fork will finally happen for the server and hope for community ip3k firmwares as well.

(No need to tell me I am so wrong on such or such account. This is my opinion.)

I hate to say that I have to agree quite strongly with Epoch1970's sentiment.

I have three Squeezebox v3s and three booms; been running this for at least 5 to 6 years now. Why? the SB3's are amazing audio quality and plug directly into my pre-amps in various rooms. They work and they stream music. The devices were designed to provide amazingly high DAC for amazingly low price. They do that; do it well.

But, for those of us who use this is a primary whole-house audio device, what's happened in the last 3 years?

erland
2011-07-23, 23:09
But, for those of us who use this is a primary whole-house audio device, what's happened in the last 3 years?

A lot has happened on the hardware side for everyone that don't have a pre-amp and external speakers in every room:

Receiver - March 2008
- which allowed a cheap alternative to expand to another room
- which made third party remotes like iPeng and SqueezePad and SqueezeCommander possible thanks to additions needed for the Squeezebox Controller remote

Boom - August 2008
- Stereo player in a room without external amplifiers and speakers

Radio - September 2009
- Small player for rooms which don't need stereo
- Battery based player that could be taken out in the garden

Touch - April 2010
- Mainly an upgrade of the Classic with better sound
- Could have been a lot more if the built-in server had worked reliable

I'm more disappointed at the progress on the software side than the hardware side. If Logitech continue to release new hardware every year as they've done the last three years it really doesn't look bad on the hardware side. Of course, I personally doubt we will get any new hardware during 2011, but this is just a feeling and not based on any real information from Logitech.

Skinny
2011-07-24, 00:08
I voted on the 1st alternative, but there were other valid points as well. Such as having recently bought more .. :D Well I wouldn't have if they didn't work well for me, would I?

I don't know if there is anything better out there, and honestly couldn't be bothered. The Squeezebox system is so good that once I found it some 3 years ago, I stopped looking at once. Haven't looked anywhere else since then and probably won't find the need to anytime soon.

-Skinny

Mnyb
2011-07-24, 00:58
I'm with erland here the server software could be so much more.

But the open source plugin architechture makes it unique for these kind of products.

I can listen to spotify on my SB3 that product was designed before spotify existed in the first place :)
This just one example, wich other products of this kind stays usefull over such a long time.

that the sad thing about the underdeveloped software, it has potential to do even more.
both regarding exploring ones own music and adding even more services.
or even better combinations of the above why not search spotify for similar music to the files from my own library ?

atrocity
2011-07-24, 11:45
I'm usually the first one to bitch about anything, but I agree with every positive comment in this thread and have not experienced any of the downsides some have. I think the *only* issue I've ever had over the years was the obnoxious network trouble in 7.5.3, and even that was pretty minor.

Someone else used the phrase "life changing" and I have to agree. I'm 52 and have been obsessed with recorded music and its playback technology literally for as long as I can remember.

When people first started talking about music servers, my knee-jerk reaction was "Why bother?" I still think that the CD is an *excellent* music delivery system and thought that people complaining about the alleged "inconvenience" of discs were crazy.

But at some point in the high-speed Internet era I started downloading lossless live concerts and, as an eMusic member, MP3s. I also discovered online radio, specifically Radio Paradise. Integrating all that stuff into a "normal" stereo was a pain. I started out with a Roku Soundbridge just because I liked having something like that for Internet radio. But I was never happy with its playback of my own files (anything that isn't gapless is, as far as I'm concerned, crap) and on a whim bought a Squeezebox.

Oh, boy. At first it was just to let me mix and match Internet radio with what I'd downloaded. It was nice to be able to audition the downloads before committing them to disc and *then* finding out there was some fatal problem. But it didn't take long before I started thinking about putting my main collection of pressed CDs online and once I started, I was unable to stop until I was finished. It took me fully a year and half to get it all done but now, as others have said, I listen to my music more than I did for years beforehand.

I've probably got 2,500 or more CDs. They're reasonably well organized, but the physical reality of the layout of the house combined with general clutter makes some of them difficult to get to. Then there's that whole thing where "I know I have a copy of that song, but what compilation CD is it on..?" None of that is an issue any more. And my "normal" collection integrates perfectly with my bootleg collection and with Internet radio and with podcasts. EVERYTHING is in one place.

The ability to queue up any songs I want, re-arrange playlists on the fly, add another track because something in what I'm listening to now reminds me of it, etc. just makes it all even sweeter.

There are even obscure cases where playing something via the Squeezebox works better than playing the disc. I've collected a lot of DTS conversions of old quadraphonic albums over the years, and my luck getting CD-Rs to work reliably on disc spinners has been up and down. I no longer care: If I can get a clean read into the computer, I'm set.

Then there's the whole thing about being able to get to my entire library from any wi-fi equipped motel anywhere in the world...

The list just goes on and on and on. Other than, I suppose, the amount of time it took to set everything up, I can't think of a single negative about this system at all. No, I take that back: The one single lone thing it can't do that I wish it could is output multichannel FLAC, allowing me to get my DVD-As online. Of course, that's probably a fraction of a percent of my collection and I'm not losing any sleep over it.

Another completely unexpected benefit is that it's gotten me a bit more comfortable using Linux. I started out with an XP server, but it was just too overloaded and didn't work out so well. I wound up buying a very cheap box to run Linux and haven't looked back.

Kaizen28
2011-07-24, 13:59
I have owned an SB3 for 5 years now. My collection includes:
- 1 x SB3
- 1 x Boom
- 2 x Duet

I love the quality of the sound, the 3rd party applications, the easy access to some 60,000 tracks AND the ability to stream podcasts and radio stations seamlessly.

I absolutely LOVE the fact that I can control all the units using my iPhone or ProntoSqueeze.

The only down side has been that the software has been a little odd from time to time but for me the system is rock solid. Perhaps this is as I'm a networking guy by trade which means GigE everywhere, a stable wireless infrastructure and manged address allocation.

Regardless, I love the little things. I just wish that intelligent playlists were better.

GRC
2011-07-24, 15:30
Why do I stick with Squeezebox? The software updates are frequently irritating (I've turned off automatic updates after 7.5.5) and the clients are not exactly intuitive. But, at the time I bought my first one (see sig) there simply wasn't a viable and affordable alternative.

My brother-in-law bought Sonos and, while he's had none of the wireless networking issues I enjoy, he has had many library management issues with the system simply not seeing some sources. And he's an Apple fanatic as well! Plus I think my system looks and sounds better than his.

Until the Sonos Play 3 there wasn't an equivalent to Boom (better bring in Boom 2 quickly guys) and the Radio is still the best. Touch is flawed but unbeatable for the price IMHO.

Would I buy again? Maybe. I've been a Naim fan for years and may have gone the Uniti route had it arrived earlier or if I was starting out now.

But I've also realised that I'm now retired with 60-year-old years so income and hearing are now both "sub-optimal". I'm now the weak link in the audio chain. Heck - I've also just splashed out on a Revox PR99 MK2 reel-to-reel tape recorder so what does that tell you about me?

Bottom line - still good value for money but not recommended for techno-phobes.

Thank you and good night.

GRC

Fozzy
2011-07-25, 10:52
I actually can't remember how long ago I bought the first Squeezebox.

At the time I already had an extensive CD collection and storage was a problem. I could not easily have the whole collection available near a CD player and it was too much trouble to dig into storage boxes or even the loft to find some of the disks.

I wanted something that would enable me to put all the music on a server and then listen to whatever took my fancy without having to find the physical CD. I also wanted HiFi quality, not necessarily audiophile but good enough that I wouldn't be distracted from the music by noticeable distortion or extreme colouration. I already had some HiFi separates and speakers so something that would plug into an input on my existing amp would be ideal.

Someone at work recommended the Squeezebox and the fact that server would work on my Linux PC was a definite bonus. I bought a SB Classic (though it wasn't called that at the time) and was very pleased with it as it fulfilled all my criteria above. The sound quality is certainly good enough for my ears.

After that I bought some Squeezebox booms, first for my daughter's bedroom then for our bedroom and the kitchen. I wasn't expecting great sound quality though I have been surprised how good the frequency response is. The stereo image is limited but no worse than a normal boom box which would typically be used in the same location. The advantage of the SB booms is access to the same library I have already spent the time ripping and no arguing over who has borrowed the CD.

I have a desk with both a work PC and home PC at it and over four years ago I bought a HiFi amp and bookshelf speakers so I could listen while I worked. The home PC sound card output was simply connected to one of the amp inputs. On one PC upgrade I found the new integrated sound card would only do 48k sample rate. All other rates were converted in software and the sound quality was poor. Forcing the use of a better resampling algorithm only changed poor to borderline I decided to save some power by transferring the library (and much of my other data) to a NAS and got another SB classic to hook up to amp on my desk. The sound quality is much better and while I am working on the work PC I can have the home PC turned off.

The final development is discovering SqueezeCommander for Android. This is an excellent application for controlling the squeezeboxes and something I probably use more than the web interface.

So, to cut a long story short, at each stage I have chosen squeezeboxes because they do exactly what I want and have at each stage I have been pleased. I chose satisfaction with the squeezebox system as the reason I stick with it but of course I do now have a certain investment in the system.

I did have an issue with a particular wireless router which I have mentioned elsewhere but changing the router concerned fixed that problem.

It appears my NAS should should be able to support DNLA players sharing the same library even before SB server supports this but as yet I have not had any reason to get one. I don't have a particular interest in building a video library and in any event we have a satellite PVR attached to the only TV in the house which can obviously record and also play BBC iPlayer content and an on-demand TV box too.