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Kellen
2011-03-09, 10:25
I'm just wondering if the caliber of the computer one uses affects the quality of the sound coming out of the Squeezebox unit?

If yes, how best to handle it and if no, why not?

JJZolx
2011-03-09, 10:40
No, it doesn't. The only way it can affect 'sound quality' is if it's so slow or overloaded with other tasks that it can't keep the audio buffer sufficiently filled on the Squeezebox and you experience dropouts. Otherwise, it just needs to keep feeding data across the network, which is trivial for just about any computer.

That said, the speed of the computer may affect the overall user experience with a Squeezebox product. It plays into how fast the user interface responds, and how much time a library scan requires.

garym
2011-03-09, 11:59
No, it doesn't. The only way it can affect 'sound quality' is if it's so slow or overloaded with other tasks that it can't keep the audio buffer sufficiently filled on the Squeezebox and you experience dropouts. Otherwise, it just needs to keep feeding data across the network, which is trivial for just about any computer.

That said, the speed of the computer may affect the overall user experience with a Squeezebox product. It plays into how fast the user interface responds, and how much time a library scan requires.

+1. Any old computer will typically work just fine. The quality of your network (wifi or ethernet) is a more likely roadblock. And remember, until the data arrives at the SB player, it is just zeros and ones. It is NOT analog data.

Phil Leigh
2011-03-09, 14:51
NO NO NO NO NO

If it did, the quality of the Internet would be affected by all the rubbish computers connected to it..

amey01
2011-03-09, 15:25
In about the same way as the calibre of the computer affects your banking records and the print quality of your word-processed documents.


if no, why not?

Think about it. Computers transfer data. 1s and 0s. There is error checking and correction in place. If this data was ever (and mean EVER) not perfectly accurate then think of the repercussions for banking, planes, navigation, communication, trading, etc.

Imagine if you transferred $1,000 to your account and you actually got $2,000. Or $10,000. It doesn't happen, does it? Remember, substituting $1,000 for $2,000 is achieved by mistaking A SINGLE BIT (that should be a 0) for a 1.

What if an aircraft was referencing an airport at 12.04327485232N 53.385893452E and it got a number wrong?

The data is perfectly delivered to the Squeezebox - unless the computer is so inadequate that it is incapable of delivering that data.

Now, this is very different to what happens next. The data ceases being *just* data, and becomes clocked data - data AND a time reference. This is where there become issues with sound quality and DA conversion.

pski
2011-03-09, 18:37
The data is perfectly delivered to the Squeezebox - unless the computer is so inadequate that it is incapable of delivering that data.

Now, this is very different to what happens next. The data ceases being *just* data, and becomes clocked data - data AND a time reference. This is where there become issues with sound quality and DA conversion.

In fact, paragraph 1 is wrong: the SB player will merely exhibit 'buffering' behavior if the computer is not fast enough (either on the network or in transcoding.) By definition TCP/IP (mostly the TCP part) will not allow errors in transmission and the SB player is buffering the "correct" data to play.

As for paragraph 2: see the explanation of paragraph 1.

P

amey01
2011-03-09, 18:43
In fact, paragraph 1 is wrong: the SB player will merely exhibit 'buffering' behavior if the computer is not fast enough (either on the network or in transcoding.) By definition TCP/IP (mostly the TCP part) will not allow errors in transmission and the SB player is buffering the "correct" data to play.

As for paragraph 2: see the explanation of paragraph 1.

P

Nothing incorrect in my post.

Sorry - you must have interpreted incorrectly. Because that is exactly what I meant. There will be no errors in the data delivered to the Squeezebox UNLESS the server in incapable of delivering the data! IE. If the data gets there, it gets there perfectly. If the data does not get there (due to a computer's inability to transfer at the required speed) then no data.

That does not change paragraph 2 - clocked data is entirely different.

The data is now only 50% of what defines "accurate". The other 50% is the timing of that data (ie. One bit exactly every 1/44,100 of a second) [for 44.1k redbook anyway]. Anything otherwise is jitter and that affects the DAC's ability to convert.