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jk200sx
2011-01-11, 03:06
Can you assign a static IP address to the controller and the receiver?
Reason I ask is that when I first set it up, its started conflicting with my WDTV Live. I assign a static IP on the WD, but to prevent other problems I'd like to do the same with squeezebox.

cats_five
2011-01-11, 04:23
I think you have to do this via your router. How depends on what router it is - they all vary a bit. You should be able to connect to it with a browser using 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 - you should need a password, the standard ones for different makes are easily found via Google if you don't know what it is.

If you are running a squeezeserver on a separate box to your PC you might want that to have a static address as well, if it hasn't already.

The SqueezeServer web interface (settings, player) will show you the receiver's IPA. I haven't found anywhere it shows the controller's IPA, but you can get it from the controller itself - Settings, Advanced, Diagnostics and scroll down a few rows. If you go down further it also shows the Squeezebox Server it's using, and you can also get the receiver's number from the controller. (settings, advanced, information, <receiver name>)

(edit) sorry should have said the locations assume you are on the latest software. People kept telling me to look in places I couldn't find until I'd updated it all.

toby10
2011-01-11, 04:53
Router based IP's not handled through DHCP are reserved IP's, the router will assign the same IP to the same MAC address every time.
This is indeed the simplest way to get the same IP to your device, assuming it is a function in your router.

If not, you can assign the IP yourself directly on the player.
Turn off DHCP on the router, reboot your player, when the player is not assigned an IP by the router it will allow you to setup a fixed IP.
Make sure you know all of the settings to enter (DNS, subnet mask, gateway, etc..)
Select an IP outside of the routers normal DHCP address' or else the router may assign your fixed IP to another device. i.e. If the routers DHCP assignments end in .1xx you should use .2xx as the fixed IP.

Mnyb
2011-01-11, 07:47
Most routers have a dchp range mine is that dchcp only handles out >192.168.0.100 to dchp clients and all else <100 is mine to set as i se fit .

So you should not set static ip's on a product in the routesrs dchp range.

You must turn off the dhcp to set static ip on a receiver via the controller or use the net::udap script (search forum) .

Controller Radio and Touch is linux so you can edit the :

etc/network/interfaces file if you know howto and reboot.

paulster
2011-01-11, 22:42
IP reservations on your router are definitely the way to do it.

jk200sx
2011-01-12, 00:41
So, if I turn DHCP of on my router and turn on the SBR, will I get a prompt on the controller to assign an IP address?

cats_five
2011-01-12, 03:09
So, if I turn DHCP of on my router and turn on the SBR, will I get a prompt on the controller to assign an IP address?

Depends on your router. On mine when I use the web interface I get a window which lists my LAN clients in two groups. The upper group are getting whatever address they get, the lower group (headed static addresses) get the same one each time, and I simply click a checkbox to make an address static or dynamic. If I plug my laptop in it will get a dynamic address though in practise it will be the same one each time - there are no other DHCP clients so it will get the first available one.

If you turn off the DHCP you might be into having to set up an IP Address on every device on the network - lots of grief - so look through it's web interface and see if you can find an easier way to do it.

Swiftie
2011-01-12, 04:54
I think the plan is to turn off DHCP on the router so that when you turn on the Squeezebox controller, it says "Hmm. No DHCP. I'll get a fixed IP address from the human".

Once past this point, you turn DHCP back on, in the router.

aubuti
2011-01-12, 05:33
I think the plan is to turn off DHCP on the router so that when you turn on the Squeezebox controller, it says "Hmm. No DHCP. I'll get a fixed IP address from the human".

Once past this point, you turn DHCP back on, in the router.
Yes, that's definitely what the others intended, but accidentally omitted, in the suggestions above. Personally I find it easier to set static IPs on the Receiver via Net::UDAP and on the SBC by editing /etc/network/interfaces, but YMMV.

toby10
2011-01-12, 05:51
So, if I turn DHCP of on my router and turn on the SBR, will I get a prompt on the controller to assign an IP address?


I think the plan is to turn off DHCP on the router so that when you turn on the Squeezebox controller, it says "Hmm. No DHCP. I'll get a fixed IP address from the human".

Once past this point, you turn DHCP back on, in the router.


Yes, that's definitely what the others intended, but accidentally omitted, in the suggestions above....

Yes to all of the above. ;)

paulster
2011-01-12, 14:50
Have a look at the menus in your router as you will usually have a DHCP range set somewhere. You can assign static IP addresses outside of the DHCP pool range (as long as they fall within the same subnet) and it will be fine, following the instructions you've already been given to turn DHCP off temporarily or use Net::UDAP.

My preferred way is to use the router to reserve static IP addresses for specific client MAC addresses, which most routers have the ability to do.

This means the client device still sends a DHCP request as normal and doesn't require any special configuration, but the router will always assign it the same IP address, which is either outside the DHCP pool or a specific address within the DHCP pool depending on the router.

This has the advantage that if you ever need to change your router and end up with a different LAN-side subnet as a default, that all your devices will come up as normal and you can then assign the static IPs.

If you changed subnet (e.g. from 192.168.0.0/24 to 192.168.1.0/24 as these are two common router defaults) you wouldn't be able to see your devices if they had hard-coded static IP addresses on the other subnet until you reconfigured it back and left it, or reconfigured it, changed the IP addresses and then reconfigured it back again.

I like to keep the client devices as vanilla as possible and do the configuration centrally at the router as it means a single point of management, but others prefer to manage this kind of stuff at the client nodes.