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twynne
2010-11-02, 10:02
Hi,

I've upgraded my router this week to a model that happens to support QoS. In particular it can prioritise by Application (which appears to be identified by what ports it uses), MAC address, or ethernet port.

I'm wondering if I can define internet radio by what ports are used, and set this as highest to avoid other traffic interfering with my listening.

Can anyone offer advice on what ports are used? I'm assuming this will differ from the ports used by SBS (9000, 3483, etc). Also I don't want to grant priority (by MAC) the machine running SBS as this would cause other traffic on that machine to potentially conflict with radio data.

I have, incidentally, done a search on the subject and the only posts I could find were related to configuring QoS in a different way to what I propose above.

Many thanks,

Tom

andynormancx
2010-11-02, 10:22
The port used to fetch Internet radio will be entirely dependant on the radio stream you are listening to, though most of them are likely to be port 80.

twynne
2010-11-02, 10:30
Thanks - in this case it's mainly Capital FM London that I listen to. Is there any easy way to confirm which port is used? Does this show up in server logs at all?

As an aside, I don't support there would be any issue with just prioritising port 80 as it would also cover any browsing I happen to be doing.

Thanks!

Tom

twynne
2010-11-02, 10:40
Not sure if it helps, but fiddling around with logging (Mac OS X server) I've found the following:

10-11-02 17:38:45.4147] Slim::Networking::SqueezeNetwork::Stats::logRadio (145) Reporting play of radio URL to SN: http://mediasrv-the.musicradio.com/CapitalRadio, duration: 300

As it's HTTP and doesn't specify any port, am I same in assuming it's 80?

Goodsounds
2010-11-02, 10:40
Most internet radio sources stream at a quality level that is rather undemanding of bandwidth. I don't know that much about it, but I can't imagine that prioritizing internet radio as among competing uses is going to do much.

What problem(s) are you experiencing that you think this will cure?

twynne
2010-11-02, 10:42
Most internet radio sources stream at a quality level that is rather undemanding of bandwidth. I don't know that much about it, but I can't imagine that prioritizing internet radio as among competing uses is going to do much.

What problem(s) are you experiencing that you think this will cure?

In some cases I suspect radio streaming is competing with torrents downloading for bandwidth. I was hoping that setting the streaming above anything torrent-related would help. I've already set the ports using by torrents to the lowest priority. Of course it's difficult to tell if this is really having any impact at all, so it may take a few days of experimenting to be sure.

Mnyb
2010-11-02, 10:43
You could work it the other way give torrents at the port you use and http the lowest possible priority, so that downloading and web surfing gets lower priority than anything else .

twynne
2010-11-02, 10:44
You could work it the other way give torrents at the port you use and http the lowest possible priority, so that downloading and web surfing gets lower priority than anything else .

Thanks - I've done that for torrents (see above) but regarding HTTP wouldn't you want that at the highest for internet radio?

Mnyb
2010-11-02, 10:52
Thanks - I've done that for torrents (see above) but regarding HTTP wouldn't you want that at the highest for internet radio?

hmm maybe ? got think some more I used Qos once before upgrading my ISP i just have forgott how i filtered out typical web traffic.

andynormancx
2010-11-02, 11:06
In some cases I suspect radio streaming is competing with torrents downloading for bandwidth. I was hoping that setting the streaming above anything torrent-related would help. I've already set the ports using by torrents to the lowest priority. Of course it's difficult to tell if this is really having any impact at all, so it may take a few days of experimenting to be sure.
I find it far easier to just limit the bandwidth that the torrent app is allowed to use, within the torrent app itself. Much easier that messing about with QoS on the router. uTorrent has a very handy scheduling UI as well, I let it have a bit more bandwidth to play with overnight.

Also, you need to know whether it is the download bandwidth that the torrenting is exhausting or the upload bandwidth. As most of us have more download bandwidth than upload it is normally the upload that runs out first (which in turn kills TCP download traffic). I keep uTorrent set so it will never use more than 50% of my theoretically upload bandwidth.