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paul44birch
2010-08-05, 02:37
I have just upgraded my PC internal hard drive to a 1TB in preparation for copying all my CDs to Flac, which will replace my current iTunes library. I want to rip once and will keep all CDS in storage as future back up. (Think I will go DBpoweramp route rather than EAC as I want to get all the album artwork first time).

I also have an Iomega 1TB external hard drive and want to ensure I have an extra back up of these new files and just wanted to check the forum for advice.

Is there a way to copy the flac files to both drives at the same time when going through my 600+ CD collection or should I just copy the file across to the hard drive when the process of ripping to my internal drive is complete?

Just looking for tips/advise as I am not a tech expert like many of the forum members and donít want to make any school boy errors!

Thanks

Paul

funkstar
2010-08-05, 03:44
Here is what I would do:

1. Rip a batch with dbPoweramp to a temp location
2. Check tags and meta data with something like Tag&Rename
3. Make an MP3 copy using dbPoweramps batch encoder
4. Copy all that to the external drive
5. Move the files to their final resting place
6. Repeat for another batch of albums

In fact that's pretty much exactly what I do, but I move everything to my network server. Then I have a scheduled backup of that part of the server to an external disk.

(Please don't cross post around the forums)

paul44birch
2010-08-05, 03:52
Thanks Funkstar

Why make copies as Mp3/

Also your note says don't cross post - have I not followed the forum rules on this one? It seemed best to place the post in the most appropriate areas.

Cheers

Paul

funkstar
2010-08-05, 03:59
I make a copy as MP3 for my phone/iPod/Archos/etc. I just find it's useful to have a far smaller version handy. Sure you can re-compress to MP3 or whatever on the fly, but that is time consuming when all you want to do is dump an album on your portable device when you go for a walk, for example. Or if you want to email someone a track when you are explaining why they should really like a particular artist (done this a few times) :)

As for cross posting, yes you are right they are the most suitable forums, but just pick one and post in there, then you get one thread with all the discussion. There is nothing more frustrating that loggin into the forum and writing a reply to someone only to discover they have another thread that everyone else had replied to instead. I brows the forums using "New Posts" and start at the oldest thread first, working my way forward. So I would always come across the oldest/least replied to thread first. It's also generally considered bad form to do it too.

paul44birch
2010-08-05, 04:03
Oh now you explain it its obvious. I will remeber for future posts so thanks for the tip.

regarding MP3 I have my Itunes on my laptop as well as backed up, but want to get flac version for best reply via my duet set up. So my request was to ensure my back up on the external hard drive was an exact match to what will be on my internal drive (in case anything breaks)

Paul

Espen
2010-08-05, 04:21
I did it quite the same way as funkstar, but without the mp3 part. I am planning to set up a mirror drive of some sort where I have everything in mp3 once I figure out how to do it automatically. The drive cost is insignificant these days.

Also, I use linux on the server and I plan to start using rsync for backup. The mirror drive may then not in the same house. For now I store the backup drives on another physical location. I have two. Disk A is outside the house and disk B is moved to the house when I have to backup. B outside the next time etc.

When I started to rip all my CDs to FLAC I thought it was a lot of data. Later I converted all my DVDs as well to ISO or MKV containers and then I realized FLAC is not really that much to talk about :) The real value is all the time spent on converting. The price for harddrives used for a good backup and handy mp3 mirror is nothing.

funkstar
2010-08-05, 06:49
regarding MP3 I have my Itunes on my laptop as well as backed up, but want to get flac version for best reply via my duet set up. So my request was to ensure my back up on the external hard drive was an exact match to what will be on my internal drive (in case anything breaks)
I also use itunes for syncing with my iPod, but that is all. Everything is done manually, I also started ripping to FLAC a long time before I bought an iPod. I just point iTunes to the MP3 folder on my server and let it catalogue that (although it is told not to move or manage anything).

Something I have done from time to time is go through my FLAC library tweeking tags and tidying thing up. I then just re-run a dbPoweramp batch encoding job on the lot and have an exact duplicate of my FLAC library in MP3.

This work flow suits me best, others might have a way of doing it that suits them better.

4mula1
2010-08-05, 07:42
Espen's point about an off-site backup is something most people overlook but incredibly important in the event of something catastrophic happening at your house. Think about this:

A fire breaks out and your house is a total loss. You're computer with your digital collection is now a pile of ash, as are your boxes of stored CDs. That external disk was a great idea until it also burned in the fire.

I have not only an on-site backup, but an off-site backup in case my house gets flooded or catches fire.

aspendl828
2010-08-05, 09:56
Not sure if you are running Windows or something else? On my windows set up I use SyncToy to keep a back up of my files on USB disks.

SyncToy can be downloaded from the Microsoft web site. You set up Drive Pairs - which can be internal or external and then you choose to sync them whenever you want.

I have a series of usb hard drives at my Mother In Laws. First weekend of evry month they are brought to my house and I connect them up and run SyncToy. Any new files are added to the backup and any changed files (updated tags, for example) are are also updated on the backup.

Works a treat for me!

Cheers

Andrew

TiredLegs
2010-08-05, 10:20
Here is what I would do:...
3. Make an MP3 copy using dbPoweramps batch encoder

You can use the Multi Encoder feature of dbPoweramp to automatically created both a FLAC and an MP3 file at the same time (while ripping). No need to batch convert as a separate step.


Not sure if you are running Windows or something else? On my windows set up I use SyncToy to keep a back up of my files on USB disks.

SyncToy can be downloaded from the Microsoft web site. You set up Drive Pairs - which can be internal or external and then you choose to sync them whenever you want.
I second the nod to SyncToy. Works great for its intended purpose, and you can't beat the price (free).

paul44birch
2010-08-05, 11:04
Thanks for all the replys. May have gone a little to much to Mp3 copying but my initial question was about best way to get the flac files copied across to external hard drive as flac files plus artwork etc (ie just copy and paste, or drag across?).

I will check out SyncToy.

aubuti
2010-08-05, 11:29
I have not only an on-site backup, but an off-site backup in case my house gets flooded or catches fire.
+1
add to that the possibility of theft, electrical surge, or any number of other events that could take out everything on-site. It's not paranoia if the risk is real....

vagskal
2010-08-05, 11:52
My advice would be to rip to flac to just one place and then do backup or conversion to lossy formats. Ripping and converting takes time and when you do a batch of CDs you would probably want this to go as fast as possible. You can always do backup or batch conversion at night. I used to rip to both flac and mp3 at once but I reconsidered because of the ripping time.

On Windows I use SyncBack for backup (it can do backup over FTP for updating an off site backup) and J River Media Center to keep an updated mp3 copy of my flac files. For ripping I use dBpoweramp. Tagging is done directly in J River Media Center or with MP3Tag.

funkstar
2010-08-07, 12:45
You can use the Multi Encoder feature of dbPoweramp to automatically created both a FLAC and an MP3 file at the same time (while ripping). No need to batch convert as a separate step.
But then tag changes would need to be done twice :)

Despite its multiple sources, dbPoweramp only gets about 90% of the tags right, especially when it comes to special editions of albums with multiple disks. Amazon generally had higher resolution artwork than AMG too.

TiredLegs
2010-08-08, 04:54
But then tag changes would need to be done twice :)

Despite its multiple sources, dbPoweramp only gets about 90% of the tags right, especially when it comes to special editions of albums with multiple disks. Amazon generally had higher resolution artwork than AMG too.
You can edit the tags and substitute other versions of artwork right in dbPoweramp before ripping, and everything will be applied to both the FLAC and MP3 files created.

funkstar
2010-08-09, 08:10
You can edit the tags and substitute other versions of artwork right in dbPoweramp before ripping, and everything will be applied to both the FLAC and MP3 files created.
True, I just find that work flow works will for me.

RonM
2010-08-09, 17:10
Thanks for all the replys. May have gone a little to much to Mp3 copying but my initial question was about best way to get the flac files copied across to external hard drive as flac files plus artwork etc (ie just copy and paste, or drag across?).

I will check out SyncToy.

I regularly rip using the multi-encoder facility of dbpoweramp, making one flac file and one mp3 file (for use on portable devices). As far as I can tell, there is no barrier to using the multi-encoder to rip to two separate flac files in separate places. I don't know whether this would appreciably slow the process, though it might. There doesn't seem to be a significant slow-down with the dual format (flac and mp3) process.

As others have pointed out, though, if you are going to have to do some tweaking of the tags or artwork, you will then have to do the tweaks twice -- if you do the tweaking after each rip, then you just need to copy the flac files to your external drive.

The problem then is to set up a system for incrementally copying the new files to your external drive. I find Second Copy to work very well (http://www.secondcopy.com/). It allows scheduled or manual backups, using a variety of settings. I use it for several purposes -- the two main ones being copying changed files in my master folder (on an external drive that is permanently connected to my main computer) to my music server on the network, and copying the music files to a set of external hard drives that are rotated out to a safety deposit box at my bank.

In effect I have three complete copies of my music -- 1. My main music folder to which all new music is ripped, and occasional lossy downloads stored; 2. the hard drive on my dedicated music server (a FitPC2); 3. the backup drives stored in the safety deposit box at the bank.

If my house burns down, I'll still have the latter, and will lose only the most recently ripped music. I rotate them out of the safety deposit box every couple of months.

I've even thought of the off-site storage as a kind of insurance documentation -- if all the CDs stored in my basement storage room get burned up, I can prove that I owned the CDs and probably get insurance compensation -- when you are north of a thousand CDs, that represents significant cash!

R.

TiredLegs
2010-08-10, 03:24
I've even thought of the off-site storage as a kind of insurance documentation -- if all the CDs stored in my basement storage room get burned up, I can prove that I owned the CDs and probably get insurance compensation -- when you are north of a thousand CDs, that represents significant cash!
I'm not sure an insurance company would agree. The insurer could potentially say that since you have all the content backed up, you didn't lose your music. Therefore, there wouldn't be any loss to compensate you for. In addition, having the backup files doesn't demonstrate that you actually owned the CDs to begin with. (You could have illegally downloaded FLACs from file sharing sites, or you could have borrowed the discs from friends to rip them, etc.)

More typically, for an insurance claim, you want proof of purchase (receipts) that show you paid for the items and how much they were worth. A better solution as far as insurance is concerned might be to scan all your CD receipts, and keep those scans on the backup drive in the safe deposit box.

RonM
2010-08-10, 07:55
Yes, receipts would be good. Of course, the odds of any of us actually keeping our random CD receipts from years ago is pretty low. I think some sort of documentation, e.g. a photo showing loading a raft of CDs into boxes for storage, along with the documentation of the ripped tracks, would be helpful in negotiations. It's all about negotiation.


R.

tedfroop
2010-08-10, 12:48
It's all about negotiation.


R.

Sounds like the voice of experience there....

I do a "rough property" survey about once a year when we renew the house insurance. Just go through the house, stand in the middle of the room and take pictures of everything, pull out the boxes of comics and take pictures of all the hard to replace ones along with the pictures of the full boxes, same for cd's, dvd's, albums and cassettes, pots and pans, closets, dressers, storage boxes and totes and the garage.

Stick them all on a USB stick and put them in your safety deposit box, update them next year as needed.

My offsite backup just means I won't lose my pictures or critical data and when I get my cd's replaced I won't have to rip them again...

Nonreality
2010-08-10, 23:26
The arrange audio function of dbpoweramp is pretty handy for moving (caution-not copying)your albums from one disc or folder to another. If you rip or buy music you can have it move the tracks and build folders based on your criteria. Once I have it set up for my folder and file structures it's just like the ripper and will use your tags as you want your folders to be. Just start it and does the work from then on. Best to experiment on an extra copy of your music until you get it to do exactly what you want.