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TheLastMan
2010-07-30, 04:07
Following on from EdPell's interesting query on CD collections, am I the only one who still has a collection of LPs and is busy digitising them?

How do you store your LPs?

My big problem is finding suitable archiving boxes for my LPs that are tall and wide enough to take an LP while being shallow enough not to be too heavy. I need a cheap, sturdy, stackable, permanent storage solution so that I can keep them in the loft.

Normal cardboard archiving boxes are either too short or, if they are tall enough, are too deep such that they collapse under the weight of the LPs and are too heavy to shift around.

The best boxes I have found are these plastic ones from Really Useful Box (http://www.reallyusefulproducts.co.uk/uk/html/onlineshop/rub/b19_0litreXL.php), but they are a bit heavy (when fully loaded) and expensive. They are also expensive and bulky to deliver as they are not flat-pack. I have around 600 LPs so would need 14 at a cost of around 125 (I don't like packing the disks in too tight). I might eventually go for these, but cannot justify the cost at the moment.

I have come across these cardboard boxes (http://www.amazon.co.uk/RECORD-STORAGE-BOX-VINYL-HOLDS/dp/B002LT2ZBU). They are the right size but, frankly, too flimsy to be a permanent archive solution. I also resent paying nearly 5 ($7.50) each for something temporary. I have bought a couple to keep a few disks in the study while I record them, but don't really want to buy more (I concur with the Amazon reviewer).

At the moment the rest are in flimsy and collapsing cardboard removals boxes. Anybody else have a solution? Preferably something like the above cardboard boxes but a bit sturdier and nearer 2 a box than 5!

pfarrell
2010-07-30, 05:44
On 07/30/2010 07:07 AM, TheLastMan wrote:
> Following on from EdPell's interesting query on CD collections, am I the
> only one who still has a collection of LPs and is busy digitising them?
>
> How do you store your LPs?

I had a fairly large LP collection in the 80s, probably 300 or so. I
switched to CDs (probably too early) in the mid 80s, and stopped growing
the collection.

When I got my first SqueezeBox, the natural question became: what do I
do with my LPs?

At the time, I was running a small recording studio, so I had 16
channels of 98/24 ADC into a dedicated computer with audio editing
software. So the obvious thing was to connect up a turntable and
phono-preamp, and record.

Of course, at this point in my listening career, I no longer owned a
turntable, and had no cartridge suitable. And I had long ago given my
phono-preamp to a brother or nephew.

I started with some jazz LPs that were long out of print.

The results were good, but it took a long time. As a minimum, you need
to play the LP, then listen to it, and then put it through the editing
software. Three hours was a practical minimum.

I decided that if I valued my time at even a fraction of minimum wage,
that it was far cheaper to buy CDs of those albums that were in print.
They often sell for under $10 per CD. In fact, replacing my
pop/rock/folk portions was even cheaper, as the really old stuff is
often sold two LPs per CD.

So I decided that only important, out-of-print LPs get transferred.

As for storage, they sit on the same shelf in the basement that they
have been on for 25+ years.


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

dblack
2010-07-30, 07:19
I had the same experience with trying to digitize my LP's. I set up my linux computer with the editing software, bought a preamp, found a new cartridge and needle for my turntable, bought a record cleaning kit, and went to work. I stopped after about 3 albums. Just too much effort involved.

My LP's are residing in some wooden storage crates, which I bought many years ago at someplace like Tower Records.

TheLastMan
2010-07-30, 07:35
Hi Pat, you and I have actually had this discussion before! I wasn't really asking about recording my LPs, I already have a pretty efficient workflow for that (length of LP + 20 minutes). I was really only asking about how to store them.

In case search has lost the original correspondence. My rationale and workflow is as follows:

I had about 600 LPs that I had not listened to for about 10 years since getting married (turntable in storage). I did think of replacing "the ones I liked" with either CDs or downloads.

But, to be honest, I had forgotten what half of the music sounded like, let alone whether I liked it or not. Also, tastes change so I might have liked something before and not like it now and vice versa.

That means, before I decided whether I liked an LP or not, I had to listen to it. So the turntable came out of storage.

If I was playing and listening to it, I might as well record it at the same time. No extra time required.

Once I had heard the LP, if I didn't like it, I could simply dump the WAV file. If I did like it then I could split it, convert it and tag the files.

I have a head start on you as I already have a (very expensive and good) turntable and preamp combination (Linn/Naim) sitting in my study next to my main PC. All I needed was an interface. After flirting briefly with a (flakey) "Audiophile" sound card I ended up buying a Behringer RCA -> USB interface (see sig).

The recording software I use is SpinItAgain. Very user friendly software that gets tag data from an online database (while you are recording) and suggests splitting points for the WAV file. There is masses of flexibility included and it is designed specifically for LP to digital recording so the learning curve is very short and shallow.

It uses the track length data from the downloaded tag data to split the WAV file into separate tracks. Using a simple GUI you can fine tune the start and end points of tracks, apply de-click filters, gain adjustments and so on. Personally I keep it simple. I don't apply filters or gain adjustments, I just make sure I have the levels right before I record (a 2 minute procedure at worst). The longest bit is fine tuning the start and end points.

I can output separate tracks either as tagged MP3 files or WAV files with the tag data in the file name. I generally choose the latter. I then convert to FLAC using dBpoweramp (select files, right click, convert).

I then use Tag&Rename to get the tag data from the FLAC file name. It remembers the settings so once I have it set up it is a one click job.

That is about it, really. There is some file structure management to do and cover art to download, but I generally do all that while the recording is going on.

So, assuming an LP is 40 minutes long and 10 tracks, my workflow is roughly:
1. Record LP (while also getting tag data, creating folder and downloading cover art): 40 mins
2. Fine tune start/end points of created WAV file: 10 mins
3. Output as separate WAV files: 1 min.
4. Convert to FLAC: 2 mins
5. Get tags from file name, add the odd bit of missing tag data, rename file (automatic): 5 mins.
6. Delete temporary WAV files: 1 min.

Er... that's it. About an hour in total, give or take 5 minutes depending on the length of the LP.

The only extra is conversion to MP3 for the iPod. At the moment I do that on an ad-hoc basis, but am looking into Robin Bowes's simple utility to do that automatically too.

I am really enjoying listening to my collection of LPs again, some of which I have not heard for over 25 years. I am finding that I like far more than I dislike and I now have many more albums than I would ever have bothered to replace without listening to them. Just occasionally I will dump a recording part way through - but that happens probably once in every 10 LPs.

Also, if an LP is in poor condition and I really like the music I will buy the CD. That happens to about 1 in 20 (I always looked after my LPs well).

So far, I have done around 150 albums in just over a year. That lot would have cost me (assuming the odd discount) between 1,000 and 1,500 to replace with CDs. If I do 500 of my collection that is 5,000 saved. Doing it your way I would probably not have bothered, saved the money, and done without the music. I am very glad I didn't!

Sorry - did not mean that post to be so long!

cliveb
2010-07-30, 08:27
If you buy wine by the case (12 bottles), it usually comes in fairly sturdy cardboard boxes of about the right size.
And as an added benefit, the content makes all your music sound better :-)

cliveb
2010-07-30, 08:32
I had the same experience with trying to digitize my LP's. I set up my linux computer with the editing software, bought a preamp, found a new cartridge and needle for my turntable, bought a record cleaning kit, and went to work. I stopped after about 3 albums. Just too much effort involved.
Make no mistake, digitising LPs and making a good job of it takes time and effort. Unless the album is unavailable on CD, or the CD version is compromised in some way, digitising the LP is daft. (Unless you're weird like me and actually *enjoy* the process, as a hobby).

TheLastMan
2010-07-30, 08:35
If you buy wine by the case (12 bottles), it usually comes in fairly sturdy cardboard boxes of about the right size.
And as an added benefit, the content makes all your music sound better :-)
How right you are!

Sounds like a quick trip to Majestic to investigate wi... er... boxes is in order.

Labarum
2010-07-30, 08:35
I haven't owned an LP for close to a quarter of a century.

MelonMonkey
2010-07-30, 08:38
I have a bunch of LPs sitting in a box in the basement, but they should probably be in the trash. I haven't seen any LP that I'm interested in that isn't available on CD, so I've log ago collected all the music I had on LP. Even some of the more rare 12" singles material - this has been a challenge.

I haven't played any of them in a long time, so it's likely some of them will no longer play correctly due to less than stellar storage practices. ;)

TheLastMan
2010-07-30, 09:23
Make no mistake, digitising LPs and making a good job of it takes time and effort. Unless the album is unavailable on CD, or the CD version is compromised in some way, digitising the LP is daft. (Unless you're weird like me and actually *enjoy* the process, as a hobby).
Remembering our previous conversations Clive, you are a lot more diligent about "cleaning up" your files than me.

EDIT: Thinking about it further, I find it quite satisfying to listen to an LP, something I would have done anyway, and then produce "something for nothing" for so little extra effort. /EDIT

I am quite happy to put up with the odd click and pop when listening to the LP, so have no objection when hearing them on the FLAC.

Generally surface noise is only really audible over headphones in a quiet environment. Playing via the iPod on the tube or over the car stereo at 70mph on the M4 with three children under 9 in the rear seats, surface noise is the least noisy thing getting between me and the music!

In fact even listening at volume over the living room stereo surface noise is not really an issue for 90% of recordings.

If you use the most user-friendly and automatic tools available (and do not try and edit out surface noise) it is quite possible to keep the processing time for LP -> FLAC down to 20 minutes.

Once I worked out how to permanently set the codes with Tag&Rename to extract the tag data put into the file name by SpinItAgain, the whole tagging can take less than 2 minutes. Similarly dBpoweramp can use tags to generate folder names and paths, and once coded they stick too. So the encoding to FLAC is right click, convert, go. With a reasonably modern PC the file encoding is a matter of a minute or two.

SpinItAgain (http://www.acoustica.com/spinitagain/) really is a wonder, I cannot recommend it too highly. If I have a gripe, it is that the only lossless codec it supports is WAV, which cannot take tags. It therefore adds another step into the process that could be avoided.

TheLastMan
2010-07-30, 09:41
I haven't owned an LP for close to a quarter of a century.You obviously never owned a Linn Sondek LP12. They are addictive. I still reckon it makes better music than any CD player I have owned, including a 900 Naim CD3 bought in my happy bachelor days (now sold). Even after I bought my first CD player, I still bought LPs while they were available. In the dying days of vinyl, the quality got poorer and poorer so I had to stop buying.

It was a consipiricy by the record companies to put an end to the LP as a medium!
;)

dblack
2010-07-30, 09:52
Make no mistake, digitising LPs and making a good job of it takes time and effort. Unless the album is unavailable on CD, or the CD version is compromised in some way, digitising the LP is daft. (Unless you're weird like me and actually *enjoy* the process, as a hobby).

Yes, in retrospect, the thrill of the whole thing for me was gathering the right hardware, finding and installing the software, and making it work. Once I had that conquered, I lost interest.

TheLastMan
2010-07-30, 10:02
Ho hum... seems I am in a minority here.

I think I had better make my way to the Linn forums (http://forums.linn.co.uk/bb/) and see what they suggest.

carib
2010-07-30, 14:33
It was a consipiricy by the record companies to put an end to the LP as a medium!
;)

Don't you just love it!?

pski
2010-07-31, 17:44
The first is "general:" This would be a few peach crates.

I was always very careful about care and handling so the only difference between these and the others is manufacturing.

The second is "half-speed:" This would be a little over a half a peach crate.

It seems like a lot of these are sought-after.

"General" are carefully stored.

"Half-speed" are more carefully stored.

P'ski

spile
2010-08-10, 10:16
I still play my vinyl via a Linn LP12 along with my SB Touch so in effect it is the CDs that have evolved into something else. I have no trouble listening to analogue and digital.

russelc
2010-08-10, 12:41
I still play my vinyl also and have some 4500 LP's. I even occassionally still buy LP's. Some of the new 180g pressings are superb quality - far better then any other medium I have ever heard and that includes early Decca classical on 1st gen pressings.

I still haven't worked up the courage to even think about digitzing just those albums that I cannot get on CD :-)

The upside is that I think they still sound better through my LP12 than any CD player or streamer I have heard including Linn's own mega bucks items. Having said that it would be nice to get everything digitally stored if for no other reason than to archive it all. One day perhaps.

Currently my collection sits on purpose built shelves with about 600 LP's to a shelf and takes up both chimney breast alcoves.

Phil Leigh
2010-08-10, 23:33
...
I still haven't worked up the courage to even think about digitzing just those albums that I cannot get on CD :-)

The upside is that I think they still sound better through my LP12 than any CD player or streamer I have heard including Linn's own mega bucks items. Having said that it would be nice to get everything digitally stored if for no other reason than to archive it all. One day perhaps.

...

{as a once proud and fully paid-up member of the LP12 club...}

When properly ripped (and this is an art and a science) , vinyl sources replayed via a good digital player are indistinguishable from playing the vinyl. In fact in my experience they are slightly better for many reasons, of which immunity to airborne feedback is just one. Also, you only have to PROPERLY clean the vinyl once, just before you rip it...

What I am saying is that when done PROPERLY the ripping process and digital replay chain do not degrade the sound of the vinyl. However, the SB3 analogue outs are not quite good enough for this to hold - it's definitely true for a Touch though IMO.

The characteristic warm, friendly "sound of vinyl" that many people love is a bunch of distortions that happen (sometimes) to be highly euphonic. They are not easily mimicked in DSP via convolving processes. These distortions are captured faithfully in the ripping process and retained through a digital replay chain of very good quality.

In the earlier days of digital, the "nice" analoge distortions were eliminated but replaced with some rather horrible ones. This is pretty much in the past now. As a point of reference, listen to the standard 16/44 release of Peace... By Popular Demand by Keb Mo - I defy anyone to say that sounds "digital" (except for the lack of background noise...).

So IMO any fundamental/inherent digital recording/replay problems can be and have been overcome (pity it took 20+ years, though).

I have over 100 examples of rips of ultra high quality vinyl sources (at 24/96 or higher) and the best available mastering of an equivalent digital release (CD, HDCD, DVD-A whatever). It is really interesting to compare them.

Typically, the rips exhibit slight constriction of the stereo soundstage, slightly less dynamic impact, slightly less controlled bass and a slightly rolled-off top end. All these are slight - sometimes they are not audible at all. More interesting is the comparison of the critical mid-range region, where they sound very, very similar indeed.
Also that indefinable sense of "air" or "life" is present in both versions. What is more noticeable is the lack of speed stability artefacts, inner groove tracing distortion and dirt/damage induced noise in the digital masters. A great vinyl rip will minimise all of these of course, but they will always be there to some extent...


Sometimes even the best available vinyl just isn't that good - compare REM or Neil Young on great vinyl and DVD-A for example... (sorry I don't have any classical references)

Sorry, wandered off-topic somewhat.

TheLastMan
2010-08-11, 04:46
{as a once proud and fully paid-up member of the LP12 club...}
[snip very interesting post]
Sorry, wandered off-topic somewhat.

No problem, thanks for your input, glad to hear I am not the only one!

I think we rip LPs for different reasons. Although once a bachelor audiophile hi-fi nut (hence about 10k of turntable and amps), I now have a young family and consequently no longer have the time or space to set up a system, or listen to it, the way I would ideally like. However what I really did miss was the music. I make no pretence that it is in any way superior sounding to (or even as good as) a ripped CD. By your standards my LP recording process is distinctly sub-standard!

My recording of the LPs is just incidental to a process of going through my LP collection and deciding what I want to listen to through the Squeezebox and what I don't. As I say above, if the LP recording is really rubbish (and I really want the musiic) I will buy the CD as well anyway.

If I was a totally rational human being I would sell the LP12 for the 2,000 or so I would get for it, buy my entire LP collection as CDs, rip them, then sell the CDs and LPs on e-bay.

However there is something slightly special about owning music in a "hard" format such as a CD or LP. My 21 year old nephew has given up buying iTunes downloads and has now started buying CDs again - for reasons he cannot really explain. He is now going through his downloads and buying the CDs of the music he really likes!

TheLastMan
2010-08-11, 04:56
I still play my vinyl also and have some 4500 LP's.

I still haven't worked up the courage to even think about digitzing just those albums that I cannot get on CD :-)


Good grief! If you bought an LP a day, every day, 365 days a year it would take you over 12 years to acquire a collection of 4,500 LPs. At a more normal (but still slightly obsessive) rate of 2 a week it would take over 43 years!

How did you come by them all? Have you bought whole collections of other peoples records?

garym
2010-08-11, 05:09
Good grief! If you bought an LP a day, every day, 365 days a year it would take you over 12 years to acquire a collection of 4,500 LPs. At a more normal (but still slightly obsessive) rate of 2 a week it would take over 43 years!

How did you come by them all? Have you bought whole collections of other peoples records?

Don't know about the OP, but I've never bought LESS than 2 albums/CDs a week on average, and I've been buying music for a long, long time (longer than 43 years)

russelc
2010-08-11, 06:05
Good grief! If you bought an LP a day, every day, 365 days a year it would take you over 12 years to acquire a collection of 4,500 LPs. At a more normal (but still slightly obsessive) rate of 2 a week it would take over 43 years!

How did you come by them all? Have you bought whole collections of other peoples records?

I've never really thought of it like that. I have been buying music for over 40 years though so I guess it does add up. I haven't bought too many LP's in the last 10 years or so apart from about 200 classical recordings and some high quality 180g pressings.

The thing is there was a time when I would happily buy 20-30 albums a week as I seemed to spend all my free time in record shops - remember those! Browsing CD's is just no fun for some reason. I guess I was very obsessive:-)

I have acquired about 1500 albums from friends who abandened LP's in favour of the silver disc so I guess its not quite so bad as it seems.

By the way I consider my collection as modest compared to some people I know who have collections in the 10K+ albums bracket, and by todays standards it's tiny compared to some peoples digital collections.

Oh, and yes I have listened to every single album at least once:-)

garym
2010-08-11, 06:13
The thing is there was a time when I would happily buy 20-30 albums a week as I seemed to spend all my free time in record shops - remember those! Browsing CD's is just no fun for some reason. I guess I was very obsessive:-)


ah, the good old days. I probably had a good decade where I went to a record shop nearby EVERY DAY but Sunday (when closed) just to see what's new. Pre-internet of course. And in college I had a good used record shop nearby where I bought 100s of used albums cheap!

TheLastMan
2010-08-13, 02:28
By the way I consider my collection as modest compared to some people I know who have collections in the 10K+ albums bracket, and by todays standards it's tiny compared to some peoples digital collections.

Oh, and yes I have listened to every single album at least once:-)
We clearly move in different circles :)

I have about 800 recordings in total, 500 LPs and about 300 CDs, and I have more recordings than anybody else I know.

I was actively collecting recordings for about 20 years (my 20's and 30's) but more or less stopped when I got married and moved to a new house in my late 30's, ten years ago. This is a very common experience among friends of mine whose record collections were frozen in time when they got married!

garym
2010-08-13, 04:01
We clearly move in different circles :)

I have about 800 recordings in total, 500 LPs and about 300 CDs, and I have more recordings than anybody else I know.

I was actively collecting recordings for about 20 years (my 20's and 30's) but more or less stopped when I got married and moved to a new house in my late 30's, ten years ago. This is a very common experience among friends of mine whose record collections were frozen in time when they got married!

Doesn't speak well for marriage. ;-) I'm working on 28 years, but my wife puts up with the concept that if I like an artist I must have everything they ever did, including rarities and outtakes....probably why we've been married 28 years. She's just happy that I've digitized it all and stored the CDs out of sight.

TheLastMan
2010-08-13, 04:58
Doesn't speak well for marriage. ;-) I'm working on 28 years, but my wife puts up with the concept that if I like an artist I must have everything they ever did, including rarities and outtakes....probably why we've been married 28 years. She's just happy that I've digitized it all and stored the CDs out of sight.
I love music, but was never quite that obsessed! Once I got married I just became less interested in sitting passively in front of a pair of speakers, which is rather a solitary pursuit.

We started to go to more live concerts, and once the kids arrived (three within 18 months!) I had little or no free time and when we did get some we preferred to get out and try and resurrect our social lives.

Even now the only time I have to listen to music is after my wife and children have gone to bed. The weekends are chock full of family "activities". I used to spend Saturday mornings listening to records. Now I spend it on the side of a football or cricket pitch watching my sons and chatting to the other poor sods in the same predicament.

garym
2010-08-13, 05:09
I love music, but was never quite that obsessed! Once I got married I just became less interested in sitting passively in front of a pair of speakers, which is rather a solitary pursuit.

We started to go to more live concerts, and once the kids arrived (three within 18 months!) I had little or no free time and when we did get some we preferred to get out and try and resurrect our social lives.

Even now the only time I have to listen to music is after my wife and children have gone to bed. The weekends are chock full of family "activities". I used to spend Saturday mornings listening to records. Now I spend it on the side of a football or cricket pitch watching my sons and chatting to the other poor sods in the same predicament.

sounds fun! Difference may be that I also spend little time sitting in front of speakers but a lot of time listening to music. I'm listening to music, at least in the background, most of the time I'm at home, all day in my office, during social gatherings in the back garden, etc., and on the bedside boom for a bit after retiring for the evening. So I have music playing in one form or the other probably 12 hours a day, 7 days a week. Admittedly, only a bit of this 12 hours is "critical" listening in front of my best system (although even my breakfast room system is 10 times better than the best system I had in college). p.s. I agree 100% on live music. I always prefer seeing music performed live and we often plan vacations around seeing a particular artist in concert (although these tend to be nice smallish clubs or theaters in NYC or Austin now versus the Grateful Dead in rundown concert halls in 1971!). EDIT: And of course I very much enjoyed the 1971 shows!!!

TheLastMan
2010-08-13, 06:37
sounds fun! Difference may be that I also spend little time sitting in front of speakers but a lot of time listening to music.
Us too, but mainly radio, or at least it used to be so before we got the Duet.

It is no coincidence that our collection of music is expanding far faster than it has since we got married. Our daughter's current obsession with music from the "shows" is also adding (Oliver, Les Mis, Joseph etc).

Now my wife thinks it is fun putting the system on random playlist, which is brave considering we get lists like:
Sex Pistols
La Traviata
Pink Floyd
Beethoven piano sonata
The Prodigy
Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers
...etc

Not for the faint hearted!

fphredd
2010-08-13, 07:04
EDIT: And of course I very much enjoyed the 1971 shows!!!
Wish I knew an emoticon to show my face green with envy...didn't start seeing Dead shows until 1978...aaahhh, the good ole days :)

garym
2010-08-13, 07:14
Wish I knew an emoticon to show my face green with envy...didn't start seeing Dead shows until 1978...aaahhh, the good ole days :)

Way off topic now, but yep it was the good ole days! My first concert as a young teenager was the Grateful Dead, 12/26/69 (SMU Auditorium, Dallas Texas). Interestingly enough, I can actually stream that exact show from Live Music Archive! Of course everyone's taste differs and different age groups have their "classic" years, but I always thought I was lucky to be able to see many of the rock classic artists in their prime. I went to virtually every concert that came to Dallas/Ft Worth from 1969 until about 1977. So I got to see Jimi Hendrix, The Doors (with a very drunk Jim Morrison during the 2nd Show), Janis Joplin, Led Zepp in 69 or 70, the Bob Dylan and the Band during the 73 or 74 "before the flood" tour. And I got to see people like Stevie Ray Vaughn when he was playing the back room (not even the main stage) at little clubs like "Mother Blues". In '73 I saw Bruce Springsteen in a club that probably held 150 people (Gerdies on Lemmon Ave), and maybe only 30 people were there. Very few people had ever heard of him (this was the tour around his second album, probably his first national tour). I only went because a friend from Austin had just seen him at Armadillo World Headquarters and raved about the show. He blew the roof off Gerdies and I guarantee those 30 people were instant fans. And even better, he and the band stood at the bar during the set break (yes they played Sets!) and chatted with anyone who was around.

I better stop, I could go on forever....

fphredd
2010-08-13, 10:20
Way off topic now, but yep it was the good ole days! My first concert as a young teenager was the Grateful Dead, 12/26/69 (SMU Auditorium, Dallas Texas). Interestingly enough, I can actually stream that exact show from Live Music Archive! Of course everyone's taste differs and different age groups have their "classic" years, but I always thought I was lucky to be able to see many of the rock classic artists in their prime. I went to virtually every concert that came to Dallas/Ft Worth from 1969 until about 1977. So I got to see Jimi Hendrix, The Doors (with a very drunk Jim Morrison during the 2nd Show), Janis Joplin, Led Zepp in 69 or 70, the Bob Dylan and the Band during the 73 or 74 "before the flood" tour. And I got to see people like Stevie Ray Vaughn when he was playing the back room (not even the main stage) at little clubs like "Mother Blues". In '73 I saw Bruce Springsteen in a club that probably held 150 people (Gerdies on Lemmon Ave), and maybe only 30 people were there. Very few people had ever heard of him (this was the tour around his second album, probably his first national tour). I only went because a friend from Austin had just seen him at Armadillo World Headquarters and raved about the show. He blew the roof off Gerdies and I guarantee those 30 people were instant fans. And even better, he and the band stood at the bar during the set break (yes they played Sets!) and chatted with anyone who was around.

I better stop, I could go on forever....

If you're ever in new joisey, please let me know, would love to buy you a beer (or seven) and hear stories...one claim to fame here, met my wife at a Dead show :D

maggior
2010-08-13, 11:32
I'm working on 28 years, but my wife puts up with the concept that if I like an artist I must have everything they ever did, including rarities and outtakes....probably why we've been married 28 years. She's just happy that I've digitized it all and stored the CDs out of sight.

I'm in the same situation, except I'm only working on year 7 of marriage. My wife is very understanding of my hobby. Once kids arrived, my music obsession actually became greater because I could pursue the hobby and deal with kids at the same time. When we bought the house, I was told upfront that "the CDs and DVDs go in the basement". I got used to it. Things really brightened when the Squeezebox came along because now it doesn't matter :-).

I buy music less often now only because there isn't as much good music being realased as there once was.

garym
2010-08-13, 11:47
If you're ever in new joisey, please let me know, would love to buy you a beer (or seven) and hear stories...one claim to fame here, met my wife at a Dead show :D

Will do! I make it to the wonderful world of Florham Park now and again (although I do like Madison nearby). And I hope this means that your wife likes the Dead. My wife actually likes most of my music, but she can't stand the Grateful Dead. It doesn't help that I have 700 or 800 shows I can listen to. She fall in the camp of "American Beauty" is good but why would one want to listen to all these long drawn out songs that don't even seem to be songs. And she is really at a loss to understand why I'd want to hear the same song performed in 1970, 71, 73, 77, 85, etc. Oh well, to each their own!

fphredd
2010-08-14, 06:45
Will do! I make it to the wonderful world of Florham Park now and again (although I do like Madison nearby). And I hope this means that your wife likes the Dead.

She caught more shows than me, and I was either side of 200...so that's a YES! Hope to meet you soon. Back to topic... :)

dennis55
2010-08-16, 16:50
coming late as usual to this thread i'll chuck my tuppence worth in.......
my small vinyl collection live in MDF cubes within easy reach......much to SWMBO's chagrin!.
I have duplicate recordings on Phillips Musicassette,Vinyl,CD and upstairs Qnap server.

the Sondek tops the lot of them as far as audio quality goes,folk are quite surprised to see a "record player" in todays digital world :)

dennis



http://cdn.images.juno.co.uk/full/IS342028-01-01-BIG.jpg

ralphpnj
2010-08-18, 07:56
I still have around 2,000 LPs, the vast majority of which are stored either in 15 metal milk crates (circa 1975) and two Ikea "bookcases". Pictures below. The remainder are stored in either homemade wooden crates or those cheap plastic crates (which are widely available but pretty flimsy).

Top picture: smaller Ikea unit
Middle picture: larger Ikea unit
Bottom picture: metal milk crates