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goody
2010-06-17, 08:01
http://blog.logitech.com/2010/06/16/logitech-revue-with-google-tv/

Yes, it’s true. The name of our Google TV companion box will be Logitech Revue with Google TV.

Why did we choose Logitech Revue?

At Logitech, we’re known for certain kinds of products – peripherals, video calling, entertainment control, streaming media….

Logitech Revue does everything we’re known for and more. So it couldn’t just be the Harmony Box or Squeezebox TV or, even worse, the Logitech TV Hub (although believe me, we’ve discussed them all).
The meaning of Revue is a type of multi-act theatrical entertainment that combined music, dance and sketches – wildly popular between 1910 and 1930.

Logitech Revue is a companion box and controller that brings the experience of Google TV to your TV screen. It combines everything on the Web, cable or satellite content, apps, video calling and more that will be wildly popular between 2010 and 2030, until we reinvent interaction again.

And there you have it – Logitech Revue with Google TV. We can’t wait to tell you more about it this fall.
In the meantime, to get all the latest updates about Logitech Revue with Google TV, please sign up at logitech.com/news/googletv.

andynormancx
2010-07-05, 08:46
Engadget has internals shots from the the FCC, showing the the Revue has a fan.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/05/logitech-revue-google-tv-box-hits-the-fcc/

peterw
2010-07-05, 09:03
Engadget has internals shots from the the FCC, showing the the Revue has a fan.

And no RCA audio outs (neither digital nor analog): http://www.engadget.com/photos/logitechs-google-tv-companion-box-hands-on/#3001278

The fan might not be a problem for audio use -- it seems likely that audio playback would not tax the system enough for the fan to kick in, especially if it's not putting any video out on the HDMI port.

JJZolx
2010-07-05, 09:27
Engadget has internals shots from the the FCC, showing the the Revue has a fan.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/05/logitech-revue-google-tv-box-hits-the-fcc/

Note the 'Gigabyte' printed on the motherboard.

JJZolx
2010-07-05, 09:39
And no RCA audio outs (neither digital nor analog)

This photo shows a TOSLIK S/PDIF out, doesn't it?

http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com/media/2010/05/5-20-10-googletv31.jpg

andynormancx
2010-07-05, 09:42
It really is about time someone at Engadget bought a flash gun to go with their DSLR so that they could get shots of equipment in dim rooms that have more than half an inch DOF :(

Or maybe just learn to turn the ISO up a bit...

Phil Leigh
2010-07-05, 09:57
And no RCA audio outs (neither digital nor analog): http://www.engadget.com/photos/logitechs-google-tv-companion-box-hands-on/#3001278

The fan might not be a problem for audio use -- it seems likely that audio playback would not tax the system enough for the fan to kick in, especially if it's not putting any video out on the HDMI port.

Hilarious...
No chance of integrating this with my (non-HDMI) audio rig then...
This has to be a joke.
EDIT: Ah - I see it does have a coax s/pdif...

peterw
2010-07-05, 10:12
This photo shows a TOSLIK S/PDIF out, doesn't it?

Yes. One toslink audio output, one HDMI audio/video output. One HDMI *input*. No internal hard drive, and looks like no SD/MMC slot either, though there are two USB ports. Engadget says it has a 1.2 GHz Atom CPU and 4 GB of RAM (http://www.engadget.com/2010/05/20/logitechs-google-tv-companion-box-includes-smartphone-apps-we/) (four GB!), so it should be able to run the full version of SBS.

erland
2010-07-05, 10:13
And no RCA audio outs (neither digital nor analog): http://www.engadget.com/photos/logitechs-google-tv-companion-box-hands-on/#3001278

The fan might not be a problem for audio use -- it seems likely that audio playback would not tax the system enough for the fan to kick in, especially if it's not putting any video out on the HDMI port.

It's clearly targeted at video, so I think it's probably a good decision to not include some cheap DAC and RCA connections, just to have them. It's better to focus the money on good digital audio (S/PDIF and HDMI). However, I bet this device is going to be priced aggressively, so I suspect it will be more focused on features/price than audio quality. If you want high audio quality, which the masses aren't really interested in paying for, you probably have to look for something else.

JJZolx
2010-09-02, 14:08
The Revue would be a US or North America only product, wouldn't it? If so, that might explain why it appears that the Touch is being phased out in this market. For about the same price (estimated at $250-300) you'd get a device that can actually run Squeezebox Server, maybe even without being crippled. And will also do audio playback by sticking SqueezePlay on it. Never mind that it doesn't have a touch screen - that won't matter for the target market of TV-watching, videogame-playing lumps that Logitech would love to sell to.

Could be a little too late to have decided to suck up to Google, though. The Apple TV at $99 is likely to throw a bit of a monkey wrench into Logitech's plans.

erland
2010-09-02, 22:42
The Revue would be a US or North America only product, wouldn't it? If so, that might explain why it appears that the Touch is being phased out in this market. For about the same price (estimated at $250-300) you'd get a device that can actually run Squeezebox Server, maybe even without being crippled. And will also do audio playback by sticking SqueezePlay on it. Never mind that it doesn't have a touch screen - that won't matter for the target market of TV-watching, videogame-playing lumps that Logitech would love to sell to.




Could be a little too late to have decided to suck up to Google, though.

Is there any other alternative ? It's not like Logitech have the experience to do this themselves without Google and Apple isn't going to partner up with a hardware manufacturer(like Logitech).



The Apple TV at $99 is likely to throw a bit of a monkey wrench into Logitech's plans.

The price should be problematic for Logitech but the devices seems to be pretty different:

Revue(GoogleTV):
- Focused at nothing, will support both premium content and other amateur content available on Internet. Feels like one of those can do everything but probably isn't really good at anything kind of device.
- Tries to move into a new direction with Internet TV but still supports the old cable/satellite box solution.
- Probably very few constraints but pretty geeky and due to this not as user friendly as it could have been.
- Intended to take over the TV, it's more like a replacement than an add-on. It will be the main frontend and use the cable/satellite box as an extension.

AppleTV:
- Focused on premium content even though it support YouTube just to satisfy younger people.
- Constrained to what's distributed by Apple authorized sources.
- User friendly, can be used by people without technical knowledge.
- Don't support the old cable/satellite box solution, once again Apple tries to change the world. The question is just if the content producers are ready to take this step, they have always felt pretty stuck in their old business models.
- Add-on to your existing TV for now, it's not going to be a replacement because both customers and producers are too stuck to the subscription based or commercial financed model. It will live in parallel with the cable/satellite box.

It's the broadcasters and content producers that limit the possibilities for this market. The market is going to change, it's just a matter of time. Personally I suspect Apple is moving in the right direction, it's just a question if the content producers and consumers is ready to take this step yet. However, I'm not sure the customers want a "pay per watch" solution, I suspect most people, at least where I live, would prefer a monthly subscription based model.

I'm clearly not within the Revue target group as my only interest in it is related to the possibility of SBS/Squeezebox support. For this kind of usage I'm clearly better of with a Squeezebox Touch. AppleTV on the other hand got me interested immediately, mostly as a DVD/blueray replacement. Unfortunately it's not going to be sold in my area in the near future.

dave77
2010-09-03, 05:43
I don't see the point, aren't manufacturers starting to build this functionality directly into TV's? The new Samsung LCD's over here have had similar functionality for months (eg YouTube channel, LoveFilm(like Blockbuster) film rental etc).

robroe
2010-09-03, 06:04
Any chance of this thing supporting SqueezeCenter?

I may be in the minority but I'd be interested in a Google TV product that integrated with SqueezeCenter properly and had decent audio performance.

Even if it didn't support it out of the box would does the Google TV platform support apps/plugins that could communicate with SqueezeCenter? Or did I read somewhere that SqueezeCenter might be usable through DNLA at some point?

iPhone
2010-09-03, 06:37
I don't see the point, aren't manufacturers starting to build this functionality directly into TV's? The new Samsung LCD's over here have had similar functionality for months (eg YouTube channel, LoveFilm(like Blockbuster) film rental etc).

The point might be that everybody doesn't have a new TV! Just looking at numbers let us say that 1 million just purchased TVs have this built in, that leaves what - 5 billion that don't have it? I would call that a large market.

dave77
2010-09-03, 06:48
The point might be that everybody doesn't have a new TV! Just looking at numbers let us say that 1 million just purchased TVs have this built in, that leaves what - 5 billion that don't have it? I would call that a large market.
They're doing blu-rays with it built-in too, looks like they have a US version too http://www.samsung.com/us/internetTV/

toby10
2010-09-03, 09:53
Also standalone devices are usually a bit more future proof and are usually updated more often than the TV built in versions.
Device location adds flexibility to such units as well. i.e. All my A/V gear is inside built in cabinets on one wall, my TV is on a completely different wall.

The Revue is competing in the network music tank market. It is not *needed* for anything, but that is a fast growing market segment.
Not unlike us not really *needing* a SB player, but the limitations of direct computer to stereo music streaming is made much more flexible and customizable with a nifty SB player. :)

badboygolf16v
2010-09-03, 14:21
so it should be able to run the full version of SBS.

Would be cool if it does...

pski
2010-09-03, 14:56
Anybody saying what the OS is? I'd sure prefer a Linux or BSD flavor...

andyg
2010-09-03, 15:46
Android.

jimzak
2010-09-05, 10:26
Hands-on

http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/logitech-revue-google-tv-hands-on-impressions/?news=123

erland
2010-09-06, 10:31
Hands-on

http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/logitech-revue-google-tv-hands-on-impressions/?news=123

I don't know if it's just me but it feels like they need some more time before it's even close to ready for a release. It looked even more geeky than SBS and MythTV in that short hands-on video. I don't want a computer in my living room, I want a TV, and I'm pretty sure I'm not alone.

JJZolx
2011-06-21, 14:31
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2387220,00.asp



Google Acquires SageTV

It's long been assumed that Google was going to have to go back to the drawing board and put a little more effort into its underwhelming Google TV offering. And those aren't our words. Companies like Logitech might be "enthusiastic" about Google's TV business, but the facts are in the figures—Logitech only generated $5 million in sales from its Google TV-based Revue set-top box in the fourth quarter of 2011, quite a drop from the $22 million in sales it pulled in 3Q.

THUD!!