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shane732
2010-06-07, 12:30
I currently have a squeezebox classic and a squeezebox radio. Currently both of them are working over a wifi network (i.e. neither of them are directly wired to the router).

When I try to sync the two of them it's awful. The songs stop playing every few seconds to allow the classic and the radio to sync.

What's the problem with them or is this just the way it is when syncing them?

Should I wire one of them to the router?

snarlydwarf
2010-06-07, 12:57
I currently have a squeezebox classic and a squeezebox radio. Currently both of them are working over a wifi network (i.e. neither of them are directly wired to the router).

When I try to sync the two of them it's awful. The songs stop playing every few seconds to allow the classic and the radio to sync.

What's the problem with them or is this just the way it is when syncing them?

Should I wire one of them to the router?

Probably.

Your wireless router will say something about how cool it is that it can stream 54Mbps or some such, which is way more than you need...

But it leaves out important details: as part of the connection process, both sides monitor the link and adjust according to what they see as noise. And, if there is noise, data gets dropped and has to retransmit... which makes for rebuffering issues.

Wireless is a nice idea, and works "mostly" but is subject to sharing the same channels as everyone else (your neighbor's wireless, baby monitors, intercoms, alarm systems, microwave ovens, "tv extenders" and all the other junk lives in the same area).

There are a couple things you can do: wire as much as you can. Especially make sure the link between your server and the router is wired. Just wiring this one link will cut your usage of the wifi range by 50%. If you can wire the other devices, go for it.

You may also want to change your wireless channel on the router: most routers come defaulted to channel 6. Which means most of your neighbors probably left it there and they are on channel 6, too... Try 1 or 11, as far from them as possible so you won't get their data which will seem like just noise to you.

shane732
2010-06-08, 08:24
I only really use the multiroom function when I'm having a party so it shouldn't be too much of a problem to wire the server to the router in such circumstances.

Does the router itself make any difference? I have to routers one dual band Netgear (top of the range router) and a netopia cheap router. The netopia seems to get better internet speed so I use it.

Should I change to the dual band router?

If I wire the server and then access the server from a difference laptop it won't cause any problems will it?

Also what if I used powerline network extenders would they be any better than using the built in wi-fi?

Cheers

snarlydwarf
2010-06-08, 08:51
I only really use the multiroom function when I'm having a party so it shouldn't be too much of a problem to wire the server to the router in such circumstances.

If you can, keep it wired.



Does the router itself make any difference? I have to routers one dual band Netgear (top of the range router) and a netopia cheap router. The netopia seems to get better internet speed so I use it.

Yes, especially in antenna design.




Should I change to the dual band router?


Only if you have other devices that support it. Squeezeboxes will stay in the 2.4G range but if you have a laptop, it could use the 5Ghz are and not collide... the catch is that a laptop usage is not at all like a streaming player most of the time: you load a web page and its graphics, and stop for a while to read it, then load another one... so it's spikey in usage instead of a constant demand.



If I wire the server and then access the server from a difference laptop it won't cause any problems will it?


Nope, it will all be on the same network still.



Also what if I used powerline network extenders would they be any better than using the built in wi-fi?


Some people swear by them: I've never used them myself, and don't know how well they work in the US when the typical home has a three-phase 240V incoming connection which is split into two sides of 120V each. Old X10 type things had issues "Crossing" between the two sides. I would think powerline stuff would have similar issues, but I don't know.

Have you tried simply changing channels on your router to 1 or 11 and see if that moves you away from any neighbor noise?

shane732
2010-06-10, 03:19
If you can, keep it wired.



Yes, especially in antenna design.



Only if you have other devices that support it. Squeezeboxes will stay in the 2.4G range but if you have a laptop, it could use the 5Ghz are and not collide... the catch is that a laptop usage is not at all like a streaming player most of the time: you load a web page and its graphics, and stop for a while to read it, then load another one... so it's spikey in usage instead of a constant demand.



Nope, it will all be on the same network still.



Some people swear by them: I've never used them myself, and don't know how well they work in the US when the typical home has a three-phase 240V incoming connection which is split into two sides of 120V each. Old X10 type things had issues "Crossing" between the two sides. I would think powerline stuff would have similar issues, but I don't know.

Have you tried simply changing channels on your router to 1 or 11 and see if that moves you away from any neighbor noise?

Thank for the reply - some great info in it!

I live in a house with no other broadband connections around it so it isn't a huge problem. I do however intend on changing the wireless channel this evening to see if it makes any difference.

So changing the router might make sense because the quality of the router might solve some of the buffering problems?