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ajkidle
2010-04-20, 16:29
I have AT&T U-Verse service. Their gateway acts as an 100 Mbps ethernet and wireless-G router, I don't particularly care for this so I have the disabled the wireless on the gateway and have my Netgear 3500L plugged into it. Works great, mostly.

I'm still using the U-Verse gateway as a wired router -- is convenient for plugging in the BluRay player. It'd also be convenient for wiring a Squeezebox, but herein lies the problem. The U-Verse assigns address on 192.168.1.xxx while my Netgear router assigns them on 192.168.2.xxx. Should these two be able to talk to each other? My VortexBox is on 192.168.2.150 (hard wired to the Netgear ethernet) and my Boom can't connect to it from a 192.168.1.xxx address.

Am I doing something wrong and this should work, or am I attempting to violate the rules of network addressing?

pski
2010-04-20, 16:40
I have AT&T U-Verse service. Their gateway acts as an 100 Mbps ethernet and wireless-G router, I don't particularly care for this so I have the disabled the wireless on the gateway and have my Netgear 3500L plugged into it. Works great, mostly.

I'm still using the U-Verse gateway as a wired router -- is convenient for plugging in the BluRay player. It'd also be convenient for wiring a Squeezebox, but herein lies the problem. The U-Verse assigns address on 192.168.1.xxx while my Netgear router assigns them on 192.168.2.xxx. Should these two be able to talk to each other? My VortexBox is on 192.168.2.150 (hard wired to the Netgear ethernet) and my Boom can't connect to it from a 192.168.1.xxx address.

Am I doing something wrong and this should work, or am I attempting to violate the rules of network addressing?

You can change the netgear to get along with the modem. Go to

http://192.168.2.1 and change the router's address so it's on the 192.168.1.xxx network (I put most of mine starting at 192.168.1.110.)

If you can't get a configuration screen at that address, type back.

Don't be confused by the difference between the "internet connection" and the router's IP assignment: your connections will be going out on u-verse and the wires plugged-into the netgear will NOT be plugged-into the "different" <internet> port.

Be sure to go to the new address and bookmark it so you won't forget where you put the router

NOTE ALSO you should turn-off DHCP in the netgear. This will mean that all addresses would be assigned by u-verse and the u-verse and netgear won't be fighting to assign addresses.

p

ajkidle
2010-04-21, 02:16
Don't be confused by the difference between the "internet connection" and the router's IP assignment: your connections will be going out on u-verse and the wires plugged-into the netgear will NOT be plugged-into the "different" <internet> port.



This didn't work, but I think I may have fallen victim to what you're describing here. I put the Netgear on 192.168.1.127 and turned off DHCP. I then connected an ethernet from one of the ports on the gateway (position #4, I think) into the "internet" port on the Netgear. Nothing worked when I did this. Couldn't access anything (even the Netgear setup page.) So I'm back to how I was.

Are you saying I should have plugged the ethernet into one of the 1-4 ports on the Netgear? (Methinks standard routers should come with more than 4 ports.)

JJZolx
2010-04-21, 08:51
Are you saying I should have plugged the ethernet into one of the 1-4 ports on the Netgear? (Methinks standard routers should come with more than 4 ports.)

Yes. What he's trying to describe is using the Netgear router as a simple 'access point' instead of as a router. Move the cable that connects the Netgear to the U-Verse router from the Netgear's 'Internet' (often labeled 'WAN') port to any one of its LAN ports.

sfraser
2010-04-21, 09:56
You might run into a issue using the Netgear as a AP with DHCP turned off. Sometimes in this scenario the AP will not forward the DHCP query correctly. If this is the case using static ip address's maybe an alternative.

ajkidle
2010-04-21, 14:03
Let me throw in one additional wrinkle. Due to the physical constraints of the house, it may be necessary to add a switch to this setup. Wondering if such a network design is horribly flawed. The connections would be:

U-Verse Gateway --> Netgear Router (configured as an access point) --> Netgear Switch --> Hard Wired Devices

Both the router and the switch would be gigabit, the gateway is 100 Mbps. Some devices would connect directly to the gateway via 100 Mbps ethernet, some directly to the router via 11n, and some to the switch via 1 Gbps ethernet. None of the traffic is particularly demandind in terms of bandwidth -- squeezeboxen, internet, an occassional file transfer between machines.

Networking is not my strong suit. Can I expect this to work? Would the slower ethernet speed on the gateway slow down the gigabit traffic between devices on either the router or the switch?

JJZolx
2010-04-21, 14:13
Let me throw in one additional wrinkle.

No sense getting into wrinkles until you get the above to work. :)


Due to the physical constraints of the house, it may be necessary to add a switch to this setup. Wondering if such a network design is horribly flawed. The connections would be:

U-Verse Gateway --> Netgear Router (configured as an access point) --> Netgear Switch --> Hard Wired Devices

Should be no problems. You should try, though, to get everything working on the same subnet first.


Both the router and the switch would be gigabit, the gateway is 100 Mbps. Some devices would connect directly to the gateway via 100 Mbps ethernet, some directly to the router via 11n, and some to the switch via 1 Gbps ethernet. None of the traffic is particularly demandind in terms of bandwidth -- squeezeboxen, internet, an occassional file transfer between machines.

Networking is not my strong suit. Can I expect this to work? Would the slower ethernet speed on the gateway slow down the gigabit traffic between devices on either the router or the switch?

No, it should not.

pablolie
2010-04-21, 22:07
My setup is just like that. I have AT&T Uverse, but have disabled wireless on the Uverse box. I use a Linksys WRT610N as an AP. I merely disable the DHCP functionality on the latter and assign it an IP address outside of the Uverse boxes DHCP range, yet inside the network mask. Works without any issues, ever.

ajkidle
2010-04-23, 02:46
Thanks everybody, it's working like a dream.