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mortslim
2010-02-08, 17:59
Vizio has announced that their new tv's will have streaming music (RadioTime, Pandora and Rhapsody and maybe other services).

I still like my squeezeboxes with Rhapsody because more flexible as to their placement compared to tv's and cheaper too.

But still, it is interesting how streaming music is becoming an everywhere thing.

I may already have too much music !

I remember when the only music available was AM radio and vinyl records.

dsdreamer
2010-02-08, 20:43
Vizio has announced that their new tv's will have streaming music (RadioTime, Pandora and Rhapsody and maybe other services).

I still like my squeezeboxes with Rhapsody because more flexible as to their placement compared to tv's and cheaper too.

But still, it is interesting how streaming music is becoming an everywhere thing.

I may already have too much music !

I remember when the only music available was AM radio and vinyl records.

I noticed a lot of devices are doing this; my $99 Roku box has Pandora and MediaFly on it, which is fine if I want to leave my 40" LCD TV on just to stream music. A lot of multi-media boxes, "also do music," but not very well. For example, I had a Western Digital TV box that played flac and ogg, but sold it when I found out it didn't even manage gapless album playback.

mortslim
2010-02-08, 21:14
if I want to leave my 40" LCD TV on just to stream music.

Actually you don't have to leave your TV "on" just to listen to audio from an attached box. I have the audio outs of my cable TV box and my AppleTV routed to my stereo receiver and only the video cables are connected to the TV. That way the TV can stay off and I get higher fidelity audio at the same time.

toby10
2010-02-09, 05:25
It is encouraging to see more consumer applications and platforms offering such streaming services.
Internet Radio and related Music Services are still so *niche* that I question their long term viability without such mainstreaming of the whole concept into more basic consumer devices (like TV's).

The more, the merrier, the better! :)

garym
2010-02-09, 05:38
The new blueray player I purchased is internet capable. I bought it so I could watch "instant" netflix movies, but noticed that it also connects me to my pandora account, youtube, and blockbuster instant movies. I don't use the pandora function (given that I also have an extra SB connected to my home theater setup for a secondary listening location and if I want pandora, i'll listen through this SB), but I like the idea that these things become mainstream (to insure their long-term viability).

dsdreamer
2010-02-09, 21:10
Actually you don't have to leave your TV "on" just to listen to audio from an attached box. I have the audio outs of my cable TV box and my AppleTV routed to my stereo receiver and only the video cables are connected to the TV. That way the TV can stay off and I get higher fidelity audio at the same time.

You don't need the TV on for the audio routing in most cases, but to get any kind of UI (to see what's now playing, enjoy album artwork etc.) some of us may be inclined to keep it on. It's also a bit awkward to "Love" or "Ban" tracks if you've switched the TV monitor off, for example.

toby10
2010-02-10, 03:30
You don't need the TV on for the audio routing in most cases, but to get any kind of UI (to see what's now playing, enjoy album artwork etc.) some of us may be inclined to keep it on. It's also a bit awkward to "Love" or "Ban" tracks if you've switched the TV monitor off, for example.

Very true. A workaround is to buy a small, cheap LCD screen and connect it to one of your AVR's video outs to perform this function.
S-video or Composite will do, it's just menu navigation and low-res album art.
It looks cool in your setup and I'd guess if used regularly it would likely pay for itself in a year with lower energy consumption vs a big 40+" screen.

I used this cheap LCD option for several years on my Yamaha AVR for digital cable music and Yamaha's (overly simplistic) Internet Radio and USB input functions.
It is still used sparingly today since my graduation to a REAL streaming device, thank you SqueezeBox. :)

maggior
2010-02-10, 06:48
I noticed a lot of devices are doing this; my $99 Roku box has Pandora and MediaFly on it, which is fine if I want to leave my 40" LCD TV on just to stream music. A lot of multi-media boxes, "also do music," but not very well. For example, I had a Western Digital TV box that played flac and ogg, but sold it when I found out it didn't even manage gapless album playback.


I've been noticing this myself. I think this is an area of competition for Logitech that will keep them trying to differentiate themselves. Gapless playback always seems to be at the bottom of the priority list with media streamers and mp3 players. Logitech differentiate themselves here, but the fact is that most people don't care and don't even know what it is.

Somebody else had an interesting view on this - that devices like this will bring audio streaming out of its niche status and bring it to the masses, thus keeping the market viable for Internet Radio stations and companies like Logitech.

bobkoure
2010-02-10, 08:42
The new blueray player I purchased is internet capable. I bought it so I could watch "instant" netflix moviesWhich player is that?

toby10
2010-02-10, 09:26
Which player is that?

Tons of them.
http://www.netflix.com/NetflixReadyDevices

Including any PS3.

And some offer multiple online video streaming services (I'd bet more will be added in FW updates):
http://reviews.cnet.com/4321-6463_7-6646260.html