PDA

View Full Version : Dual Core Squeezebox Server Hardware



ajkidle
2009-12-23, 19:50
I'm making plans for a new (dedicated) Squeezebox Server rig, and am strongly considering the VortexBox solution. I'm wondering if there would be any benefit from putting something together with a dual core Atom, like the new D510. Or is that just a waste of money and electricity?

induna
2009-12-23, 20:30
I just built a server to run Vortexbox using a Foxconn case with a dual core Atom 330. It works very well. I don't know if the dual core processor is necessary, but it was only a few dollars more.

hoosier
2009-12-23, 20:31
I put together a box earlier this year. It was a barbone system I put together more out of curiosity and price than anything else. It's a dual core Atom 330 and it works quite well serving up my 5 Squeezeboxen. I ddin't intend to use it as my Squeezebox Server, but it just blew away my aging Dual Xeon Processor (450 MHz), and uses a fraction of the power.

The Atom definitely has some limitations, but serving up music and webpages doesn't seem to be a problem.

ajkidle
2009-12-23, 21:06
Specifically I'm wondering if single versus dual core Atom makes any difference in performance. Given that the Vortexbox appliances use the single core version, my guess is no. Just wondering if anyone has played with both.

snarlydwarf
2009-12-23, 22:15
Specifically I'm wondering if single versus dual core Atom makes any difference in performance. Given that the Vortexbox appliances use the single core version, my guess is no. Just wondering if anyone has played with both.

SBS and the way it uses MySQL aren't all that hard on CPU, so a second core isn't all that useful.

jimzak
2009-12-24, 04:25
I've been using a single core Atom for my server for several months now.

I have not experienced any performance problems with several separate streams being served simultaneously.

aubuti
2009-12-24, 08:43
I've been using a single core Atom for about a year now. It's more or less the same MSI Wind barebones box that the Vortexbox Appliance is based on. It works fine for serving music to 7-8 SBs -- I haven't tried more than that yet. Still, the dual core is probably only $10-15 more, so I would go for that. You won't need the second core today, but maybe you will next year or the year after.

apn
2009-12-30, 18:10
I was in the same predicament as the OP, with a P3/500 showing it's age with frequent "rebuffering" messages when the machine was under load.

I considered the Atom. It's great little CPU, but I had a difficult time finding single/dual-core Mobo's with more than a couple of SATA connectors.

If you only have 2 SATA connectors, then serious RAID is out of the question, and you're stuck w/ mirroring, which constrains your growth options. Are you guys not building redundancy into your libraries? I'd hate to lose a disk and have to rebuild a library.

With my library currently at ~1.6TB and growing, I decided on the "go big, or go home" approach and just built the following;

- Intel E5200; 45 watt, dual-core CPU
- ASUS P5G43T-M Pro Mobo (6 SATA connectors)
- 4GB RAM
- 4 x Seagate low-power 2.0TB HDDs
- Windows Home Server

It's certainly more machine than I need right now, but I figure I've got room to grow, plus it can do multi-duty as a torrentslave, HTPC streaming audio/video/pics to my WDTV-live, and (via WHS) I have the option to schedule automatic backups and a host of other administrative chores for my other PCs.

I also considered Drobo, Acer Home-Share, HP MediaSmart and other ready-made options, but liked the flexibility of building my own, plus I had a suitable case and other parts lying around.

snarlydwarf
2009-12-30, 18:30
If you only have 2 SATA connectors, then serious RAID is out of the question, and you're stuck w/ mirroring, which constrains your growth options. Are you guys not building redundancy into your libraries? I'd hate to lose a disk and have to rebuild a library.

RAID is not backup.

It is 'high availability' or 'faster'... but not backup.

If your machine decides that it doesn't want to run 12V to the drives, but instead thinks 24V or something else would be more fun... you will lose everything, even RAIDed.

Cheap backup: external drive(s) that are powered down and taken offsite.

apn
2009-12-30, 19:02
RAID is not backup.

It is 'high availability' or 'faster'... but not backup.

If your machine decides that it doesn't want to run 12V to the drives, but instead thinks 24V or something else would be more fun... you will lose everything, even RAIDed.

Cheap backup: external drive(s) that are powered down and taken offsite.

Agreed, but I want redundancy for the day WHEN (not IF) one of the HDDs goes south, the probability of which is 1.0 i.e. far higher than the probability of your event :p

...plus I didn't mention that I'm mirrored to an offsite Drobo, and we resync periodically.

Redunant AND backed up :D