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davenva
2009-12-06, 15:31
Is anyone beside myself concerned about Logitech giving up on Squeezebox at some point in the future and shutting down support and the web server.

Wouldn't losing the server turn the hardware in to an unusable brick? (Maybe the MySqueezebox server would still function...?)

Maybe I'm paranoid, but I recently got burned by Microsoft, when they suddenly abandoned MS Money services.

pfarrell
2009-12-06, 15:40
davenva wrote:
> Is anyone beside myself concerned about Logitech giving up on Squeezebox
> at some point in the future and shutting down support and the web
> server.
>
> Wouldn't losing the server turn the hardware in to an unusable brick?
> (Maybe the MySqueezebox server would still function...?)

I don't see it. And I sure don't worry about it.

I can imagine that the mysqueezebox.com servers could be shut down, but
the music that I listen to is on my server in my basement with flac
files ripped from my CDs.

The server software is open source, and since its perl, you have all the
source when you install the software.

Logitech could follow the big banks or excite.com into the ether, and my
server will keep running.



--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

pablolie
2009-12-06, 17:28
I entirely agree with Pat. I don't see them giving up on this market at all. Look at how many companies are moving in now - Linksys and so many others. And I think Logitech truly has unique differentiation potential and experience (potential for very long discussion here).

I could see Logitech giving up on 3 key value propositions of the Squeezebox concept though:
- mysqueezebox.com... I bet the latest update caused quite a few people to drop it anyhow. It seems an awkward "demilitarized SB zone" these days, and the more intelligent the SB get (as with the Touch and Controller) the less it will be required.
- The very lightweight philosophy with utmost dedication to best possible audio quality... fact is the later genration SB are getting "heavier", and it seems most of the market cares about price and simplicity and ability to hook up iPods in a foolproof way more than in being able to reuse most of your audiophile chain... but I hope with some education the market comes around.
- The Transporter market segment. I would be surprised if they are not already talking to some audiophile brand that has been sleeping when it comes to the streaming revolution. I think Logitech's focus is naturally on the <$500 segment.

Logitech has the ability to kick some serious b%tt here. I just did a bakeoff against a competing product that made the flawed decision to integrate the amplifier into the streaming device, and simply got in there twith an SB3 and a Logitech Z2300 2+1 speaker system. The latter combines serious power with some surprising audio merits at less than $150. It blew the other solution away to kingdom come for less than half the price. If Logitech gives up on this market they'd be utter fools. They have a lot of the core expertise here. I just hope they also maintain the SB concept alive when it comes to audio "purity".

Goodsounds
2009-12-06, 18:18
Recent discussions have mentioned several organizational changes and staffing reductions and reassignments. One comment, that the picture would be more clear after the holidays, could be interpreted as intimating that the ship jumpers were preparing to move. Could some just be staying to finish Touch? Sheer speculation on my part, but the news is not that which would be more characteristic of a kick b product line.

Logitech could decide to wind down development, addressing the most serious software problems first, and then just operate in status quo mode. It's not like customers expect continuous software upgrades for hardware products. Everything will continue to work as is. But a loss of the core employee base would make future changes more expensive and less likely.

I'm as much of a supporter as anyone, I certainly hope for better news for all concerned, including the great people who work so hard on these products.

davenva
2009-12-07, 17:15
Also being a supporter, I hope that you're right in that Logitech will support SB well into the future.

I'd like to see them do for Internet video what they did for audio. A small, inexpensive, easy to use consumer box that hooks a TV to the Internet.

I just worry about being abandoned. (I never thought that Microsoft would abruptly exit the personal finance business & leave me with 10 years of data in an unsupported and brain-dead software product, MS Money!)

Being a new owner of a SB Radio, and seeing the reluctance of Logitech to address glaring and widely discussed software bugs, made me start to wonder about their commitment to the business.

How "open" is the SB hardware? Could someone other than Logitech write applications for it?

pfarrell
2009-12-07, 17:59
davenva wrote:
> How "open" is the SB hardware? Could someone other than Logitech write
> applications for it?

Hardware?

The server is fully open.
The recent units, Radio, Touch, etc. have a fairly strong computer in
them, and there are SDK and documentation. Even a separate forum (Jive)
for that.

I think (not sure) that the fundamental operating system on the recent
units is not open source, but that is mostly kernel level stuff that no
sane person wants to touch anyway.

The protocols between the server and the units is open and well documented.

I see this as a lot like MySql, Sun bought MySql, and Oracle is trying
to buy Sun (and MySql) and there are already forks off by the open
source folks.


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

DaveWr
2009-12-08, 01:14
The server maybe a fully open codebase, but if Logitech fail to continue, I doubt the open source community could take it forwards.

The development team have changed interfaces repeatedly, documentation of key interfaces is out of date. The third party developers struggle to maintain code that works. Two major ones seem to have given up.

The latest moves - Radio & Touch seem more akin to what people have against Mr Jobs style, significant requirement for MySb.com. This the same as the Harmony remote business, also purchased by Logitech.

As to the longevity, I have no opinion. Obviously Logitech have been right-sizing the business, their management will be primarily focussed on returns.

One has to treat the product for what it is. buy today, it is the most effective product on the market, but don't expect hi-fi component longevity of the systems. This is the fast moving consumer goods market, not Sean & Dean's great innovation, volumes and profit returns are the key issues.

Dave

andynormancx
2009-12-08, 03:20
The server maybe a fully open codebase, but if Logitech fail to continue, I doubt the open source community could take it forwards.

There would be little problem with taking the code "forwards". The code works already, there are bugs here and there but overall it works pretty well.

In any normal development life cycle you'd describe Squeezebox Server as feature complete.

So it isn't as if anyone maintaining it would have rewrite big chunks of it, like the SB dev team have been doing recently (to get it to work well on the Touch).

This of course just applies to the server software and some of the software on the newer players. We'd be stuck with the firmware as it currently is on the Boom, Receiver, SB3 etc

pfarrell
2009-12-08, 09:10
DaveWr wrote:
> The server maybe a fully open codebase, but if Logitech fail to
> continue, I doubt the open source community could take it forwards.

Probably true, but that does not turn your currently working product
into a brick. (i.e. the thread title)

It does mean that adding cool new features will slow down or perhaps stop.

So if you like what it does today, you are fine forever.

If you bought it because of what it may do sometime in the future, you
are a lot more optimistic than I am.


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

DaveWr
2009-12-08, 09:37
Fully agree pre- Radio / Touch era

Dave