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View Full Version : Squeezebox over mains network?



pulsar
2009-08-19, 14:03
Hi,
I have just moved into a new home and am looking to buy a sound system that uses all my stored digital music, which at the moment is all on itunes. I then want to be able to play music in different rooms of the house.

I donít want a wireless system, and I have ruled out Sonos.

I would like to know if the squeezebox systems (Duet and Boom) are able to use a mains network connection rather than wireless connection? A mains network connection I mean using an Home Plug adapter as a means to link to my network?

pfarrell
2009-08-19, 14:09
pulsar wrote:
> I would like to know if the squeezebox systems (Duet and Boom) are able
> to use a mains network connection rather than wireless connection? A
> mains network connection I mean using an Home Plug adapter as a means to
> link to my network?

All SqueezeBoxen have a normal RJ45 Ethernet jack, in addition to WiFi.
So you can plug into CAT5/6 or anything that ends up with a Ethernet
jack, such has Home Plug.



--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

radish
2009-08-19, 14:12
Sure, just run an ethernet cable from the homeplug to the squeezebox. Lots of people on the forums have reported good results with this setup, of course provided that your wiring allows the homeplugs to work well.

pulsar
2009-08-20, 03:47
does this mean you can turn off the wirless?

maggior
2009-08-20, 05:13
You can turn the wireless capability of the squeezebox off when it is hardwired to ethernet. With the SBR, you reset it, connect it to an ethernet cable, and go through the setup. During setup, you will be asked if you want to connect to ethernet or wireless.

For the Boom and the SB3, I think you can just left arrow into the network settings and make the setting update there.

toby10
2009-08-20, 05:20
does this mean you can turn off the wirless?

Yes, you can turn off the wireless on your router. The HomePlug type system uses your home/apartment electrical wiring.

ROUTER >rj45< HOMEPLUG >outlet< *electrical wiring* >outlet< HOMEPLUG >rj45< SB PLAYER

The only catch is that both HomePlug's must be on the same wiring circuit.

DigitalMitch
2009-08-20, 06:55
I've just upgraded my network to ethernet over power (Netgear HDX101's) for
1 PS3, 1 SB3 and 2 SBR. Another SB3 is wired direct into the router.

However my wireless network is left on for the Controller, my iPhone and my Boom (which moves between garden, garage and bathroom).

If you don't use the controller then you could disable wireless on your router, and rely on the IR remotes, Boom or your PC. The rumoured SB Touch may give another wired control option.

pfarrell
2009-08-20, 08:54
pulsar wrote:
> does this mean you can turn off the wirless?

I am pretty sure that when the SB detects a real Ethernet physical
connection, the WiFi is disabled automatically

--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

hunta
2009-08-20, 13:41
I use 'em, and love 'em. I haven't disabled the wireless, it just runs off the ethernet port. Works like a dream.

Pale Blue Ego
2009-08-20, 14:56
I've been using HomePlug networking with squeezeboxes for years with no problems. Only issue I aver had was after a power outage I had to unplug and replug the HomePlug connected to the router.

morris_minor
2009-08-20, 16:21
I'm another happy Homeplug user. Wi-fi's on for the Controller, laptops, iPeng and the Boom, but otherwise my gear's on ethernet via the mains . . .

pulsar
2009-08-21, 03:07
.wow, seems like the homeplugs are a winner here. I have a wireless broadband router downstairs and a laptop upstairs. I guess one plug goes from the router to the mains, then another plug from laptop to mains. Does this mean I need a 3rd plug to connect my squeezebox to the mains?

toby10
2009-08-21, 03:19
.wow, seems like the homeplugs are a winner here. I have a wireless broadband router downstairs and a laptop upstairs. I guess one plug goes from the router to the mains, then another plug from laptop to mains. Does this mean I need a 3rd plug to connect my squeezebox to the mains?

I've never actually used them myself, but I think they have to be done in "pairs" per device you want added to your network.

kesey
2009-08-21, 04:20
.wow, seems like the homeplugs are a winner here. I have a wireless broadband router downstairs and a laptop upstairs. I guess one plug goes from the router to the mains, then another plug from laptop to mains. Does this mean I need a 3rd plug to connect my squeezebox to the mains?

Where is your Squeezebox located?

Assuming it is adjacent to the router, then connect the Squeezebox to your router via an ethernet cable.

If it is located in a different room to the router, then you will need an extra HomePlug to get a connection from the Squeezebox to the router, or run a cat 5 cable if possible.

Chunkywizard
2009-08-21, 05:05
See attached for my (slightly out of date) set up. The Streamium has been replaced by 2 Booms, but the homeplug layout is the same (One Boom is connected via Wifi). Also my Asus has been sold and the PCH is now running an FTP server to connect to my Toppy (Harddrive Freeview recorder). Note I have 3 three port homeplugs which are great for areas of the house needing a lot of connectivity.

HTH

CW

toby10
2009-08-21, 06:22
...... Note I have 3 three port homeplugs which are great for areas of the house needing a lot of connectivity....

Thanks Chunk. Are you saying you can buy a "3 port" version where the main (no pun) HomePlug connected to the router is a single device with three ports that then can connect up to 3 remote HomePlugs at the devices?

i.e. These do not have to be purchased and used as "matched pairs" per device?

Chunkywizard
2009-08-21, 06:38
Thanks Chunk. Are you saying you can buy a "3 port" version where the main (no pun) HomePlug connected to the router is a single device with three ports that then can connect up to 3 remote HomePlugs at the devices?

i.e. These do not have to be purchased and used as "matched pairs" per device?

They don't have to be used as matched pairs. Use a single port homeplug to attach your router to the mains and then you access the feed at any other mains outlets. If you need multiple ethernets in one room then use a 3 port homeplug, or use a 1 port homeplug if you just need one port for a Boom for example. As long as your router is connected to the mains you can have any other number of homeplugs all over the house, either single port or 3-port. For more explanation on the technlogy have a look at: http://www.solwise.co.uk/net-powerline-intro.htm

HTH

CW

DigitalMitch
2009-08-21, 06:45
I have seen some homeplugs for sale with 4 ethernet connections but the ones I use, Netgear HDX101, only have one. The 4 port version was rated 85mps not 200 as mine.

I originally bought a pair for streaming video to PS3 but have added 3 more in different rooms for Sqeezeboxes.

After the first pair you can add them singly for this make. Mixing makes and/or models may not work and I can't comment on whether other models allow additional homeplugs (you'll have to check their blurb).

Adding the first extra one was tricky as I needed to reset the name of the first pair to default so I could see the new one. After that it was easy.

toby10
2009-08-21, 06:56
I did not know that. Thanks. :)

This mains alternative to WiFi is even more flexible than I had thought.

morris_minor
2009-08-22, 01:57
A point to watch out for is the speed of the devices. There are two "standards" - 200 (sometimes called AV), and a slower 85 (often called turbo).

I understand both types can co-exist on a "mains network", but an 85 will only see other 85 devices, and a 200AV other 200AV devices (so you could have two independent networks going . . .).

The faster standard works ok for video (YMMV!!) so there seems little point in going for the slower speed unless you absolutely know for sure you'll never need it! Both work fine for audio BTW.

I do LP rips onto a Macbook and then transfer the wav files to a desktop for editing and on to the server, so a fast a network as possible is very desireable to avoid long file transfer times, so I went for the AV devices after proving the concept with a couple of slower, cheaper units that I found going for silly prices at Maplins.

Bob

andynormancx
2009-08-22, 02:19
A point to watch out for is the speed of the devices. There are two "standards" - 200 (sometimes called AV), and a slower 85 (often called turbo).

I understand both types can co-exist on a "mains network", but an 85 will only see other 85 devices, and a 200AV other 200AV devices (so you could have two independent networks going . . .).

Now seems a good point to remind people that the Netgear 200mb devices do not interoperate with other people's devices.

bpa
2009-08-22, 03:02
There are 3 standards - 14mbps, 85mbps and 200AV. The 14mbps and 85 mbps can interwork. The 14mbps devices are mainly unavailable but may be found on ebay etc so be careful when buying.



(so you could have two independent networks going . . .).

However sharing the same bandwidth as mains tech is a shared carrier technology - so probably not getting the full throughpout of either

DoomWolf
2009-08-25, 16:16
I've just set up a pair of Billion 2071 200AV to get internet connectivity from my router downstairs to my study upstairs. When I say 'set up' I mean I plugged them into the mains sockets and just plugged the ethernet cables into them. It really was that easy, no setup required.

Because my SB3 is near the router downstairs, I've also wired it up instead of using wireless for it. It still says there's a slight drop off at the 5Mbps network test so I need to do some testing on throughput (not that it would ever affect the SB3 at that rate, even with FLAC).