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peber
2009-08-06, 02:30
So now I have ripped all my CD:s (around 320) to FLAC, stored them on a mirrored USB drive, backed them up on a second portable drive just to be sure; my squeezebox system is up and running and I am VERY pleased!

But... I have a bookshelf full of CD:s that I will probably not touch again for some time if ever. My first thought is to put it all up in the attic but I can see a few reasons for not doing that:

*/ I/my GF/a friend wants to read the booklet from a CD.
*/ I want to bring a CD to a friends house for listening.
*/ I do not know how safe the attic is for my discs regarding temp, moisture and such.

I can put them in a cupboard out of sight but then they will be in a big pile unless I buy some sort of boxes for them. Even then it will be hard to find a specific CD. And regarding booklets, are there some sort of binders for this?

How do you do with your CD:s? What are your experiences, do you need access to them now when you've gone SB? How do you store them? ANY thoughts, info or tips will be helpful! Thanks!

/Per

Siduhe
2009-08-06, 02:48
Have a look at this (http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=50527&highlight=jewel+case) thread. Loads of ideas in there - more for storage than display, but may help.

Mike New
2009-08-06, 11:12
I moved all my CDs to the garage 3 years ago, stored in plastic boxes alphabetically. I still access them from time to time (mostly to add newly ripped CDs), but I rarely (if ever) actually play one. They just seem so 90's...

Phil Leigh
2009-08-06, 11:18
I moved all my CDs to the garage 3 years ago, stored in plastic boxes alphabetically. I still access them from time to time (mostly to add newly ripped CDs), but I rarely (if ever) actually play one. They just seem so 90's...

+1 - I only go to the garage to add more CD's to my store...(after 5 years of doing this)
I miss the booklets - but not enough. We have the Internet!

pski
2009-08-06, 11:29
*/ I want to bring a CD to a friends house for listening.


/Per

I just take my laptop (and a mini-to-rca cable) or my Boom and I have ALL my CD's at a friends house for listening...

ModelCitizen
2009-08-06, 13:22
Sell them. Streamed media and the Internet make them entirely redundant.

As most others have realised this you'll not get much money for them, but you may be able to recoup some of your losses by renting out the saved space.

MC

radish
2009-08-06, 13:32
Sell them. Streamed media and the Internet make them entirely redundant.


That's a pretty blatant copyright infringement - may as well just download the tracks illegally if you're going to do that.

ModelCitizen
2009-08-06, 13:49
That's a pretty blatant copyright infringement - may as well just download the tracks illegally if you're going to do that.
God, you're so squeaky.

MC

regalma1
2009-08-06, 14:01
Stealing is stealing. You can rationalize it all you want, but in the end it is still stealing.

I have no sympathy for the music companies or the the RIAA, but they have legal rights. Besides the artists lose out as well.

ModelCitizen
2009-08-06, 14:13
The government steal my money every month and spend it on things I don't want.

"Stealing is stealing" is trite.

MC

radish
2009-08-06, 14:17
God, you're so squeaky.

MC
It took me a while to realise what you meant (clean..right?). I'm really not, but I do have a lot of friends in/links to the music world and I've seen the damage it does. Your morals are your own, and I certainly don't want to turn this into another endless copyright thread, but my point stands. There's no difference between selling the CD post rip and just using a torrent in the first place - it's up to you whether that's a problem or not.

ModelCitizen
2009-08-06, 14:33
It took me a while to realise what you meant (clean..right?).Yes, squeaky clean....


Your morals are your ownProbably.


and I certainly don't want to turn this into another endless copyright threadMe neither.


MC

lrossouw
2009-08-06, 19:23
My CDs are in a different country 10 000km away :)

Moved to a different country and left them. Wasn't worth taking them along. I am heading back to them eventually though.

ftlight
2009-08-12, 14:14
On 8/6/2009 5:17 PM, radish wrote:
>
> ModelCitizen;446424 Wrote:
>> God, you're so squeaky.
>>
>> MC
> It took me a while to realise what you meant (clean..right?). I'm
> really not, but I do have a lot of friends in/links to the music world
> and I've seen the damage it does. Your morals are your own, and I
> certainly don't want to turn this into another endless copyright thread,
> but my point stands. There's no difference between selling the CD post
> rip and just using a torrent in the first place - it's up to you whether
> that's a problem or not.

Is it OK to sell my CDs if I still keep the vinyl the record companies
sold me the first time around?

Not a hypothetical question.

--
Bill Burns
Long Island NY USA
http://ftldesign.com

Declan Moriarty
2009-08-12, 15:09
Probably not, but keep the CD's! You don't know how good you backups are and it is another line of defence if the worst happens. Sell the vynal you might get more for it! Why people seem to be getting excited about LP's now seems stupid. They sound boxy and you have all these problems with them that you don't get with CD's. Old records are usually scratched a lot whereas CD's if kept properly will be just as good condition as when they were bought.

maggior
2009-08-12, 18:24
Why people seem to be getting excited about LP's now seems stupid. They sound boxy and you have all these problems with them that you don't get with CD's. Old records are usually scratched a lot whereas CD's if kept properly will be just as good condition as when they were bought.

I don't understand it either. I can see it for somebody such as myself that grew up with the lp format and is feeling nostalgiac But these kids that were born long after the CD was introduced...I don't get it.

cliveb
2009-08-13, 02:33
I don't understand it either. I can see it for somebody such as myself that grew up with the lp format and is feeling nostalgiac But these kids that were born long after the CD was introduced...I don't get it.
Perhaps today's kids aren't as stupid as we tend to think.

Maybe they've noticed that the mastering of vinyl is so vastly superior to the hypercompression and clipping you get on CDs that the music sometimes sounds better on vinyl, despite the format's inherent faults.

maggior
2009-08-13, 06:35
Perhaps today's kids aren't as stupid as we tend to think.

Maybe they've noticed that the mastering of vinyl is so vastly superior to the hypercompression and clipping you get on CDs that the music sometimes sounds better on vinyl, despite the format's inherent faults.

Good point...forgot about the "loudness war".

morris_minor
2009-08-13, 15:19
Perhaps today's kids aren't as stupid as we tend to think.

Maybe they've noticed that the mastering of vinyl is so vastly superior to the hypercompression and clipping you get on CDs that the music sometimes sounds better on vinyl, despite the format's inherent faults.

A "Mail-on-Sunday" newspaper piece about the ex-EMI pressing plant in Hayes said:

"You might imagine that in a world where new music is routinely downloaded off the internet - and in 95 per cent of cases, illegally - paying for something as old-fashioned as a record in a cardboard sleeve would be the last thing any groovy kid would want to do.

In fact, though, the opposite is true. Owning the vinyl product of your favourite band has become a badge of honour, the ultimate proof of serious fandom. Any old lightweight can nick music online. But to pay for an actual record buys you the thing that matters - and has always mattered - more than anything else in rock: authenticity."

http://www.thevinylfactory.com/the-return-of-the-vinyl-how-britain-got-its-groove-back

@Declan M: LPs - boxy?? You've been listening to the wrong system !

Edit:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/8000618.stm - short BBC video about the Hayes plant

http://www.thevinylfactory.com/vf-manufacturing - the plant's own video (to the sound of Steve Reich it seems . . )

exile
2009-08-13, 17:10
I know this forum has been to mars and back in discussing this issue and there seems to still be those folks that are absolutists about the idea of copyright infringement laws.

to me, that argument is way too simple.

we live in a time of rapidly evaporating copyright truths. the internet revolution right or wrong has created the idea that virtually everything should be available for free or darn near free. To some of us folks who put up with $11.99 records before they became a niche market item and then $18.99 cds when the record companies started to see that their profits were going up in smoke due to the internet, the revolution has been a wonderful breath of fresh air in a formally greed oriented business.

so now the question becomes how do we properly compensate the artists for making this fantastic music? currently, it looks like the purchasing of recorded music tracks will become secondary or even tertiary to live concerts and merchandising.

so my advice for the folks who are hung up on the minutia of copyright issues is to go see live music-pay a fair price for that ticket and then buy a t-shirt, poster, or other band related trinket. that's how you can pay that artist back for getting the music on amazon for cheap or for free online or through a hard drive swap with a friend or any other combination of ways that many folks like myself are getting their digital files.

Goodsounds
2009-08-13, 21:27
I know this forum has been to mars and back in discussing this issue and there seems to still be those folks that are absolutists about the idea of copyright infringement laws.

to me, that argument is way too simple.



So too is your rationalization.

If you don't like the law, work to change it. Thankfully most people obey most laws. When you choose to ignore one, you've done so because you like the result, not because your disagreement with it is in any way relevant. And also not because your "workaround" or "consolation prize" has any validity.

PS - Martian weather is very nice this time of year ;-)

exile
2009-08-21, 14:47
the new book "Ripped:How the Wired Generation Revolutionized Music" tells quite a story about this revolution we are all a part of and an excerpt from the book was in the nyt's book review.

Edgar Bronfman Jr., the chief executive of the Warner Music Group, said in 2007: “By standing still or moving at a glacial pace, we inadvertently went to war with consumers by denying them what they wanted and could otherwise find. And as a result, of course, consumers won.”

that pretty much says it all.

Goodsounds
2009-08-21, 16:44
Do your work for an entity that produces a product or service? If not, pretend you do. What would happen to your job, and to those products or services, if your employer's customers decided they were entitled to your output for free? (Hint - think of the newspaper industry today)

I presume you like listening to recorded music. You expect artists to continue to record, and new artists to come on to the scene, but at the same time you think you are entitled to get that recorded music for free? Fine, but it won't continue.

You can have any opinion you want, I don't care. If it differs from mine, all the better, I can learn and we can discuss. But have thoughtful opinions, not unrealistic and selfish ones.

bephillips
2009-09-03, 12:59
copyright infringement ≠ theft

Why do some people have such a hard time with this distinction?

Theft is taking something from someone and depriving them of it. It is a criminal offense.

Copyright infringement is making an unauthorized copy (and deprives someone only if the infringer would have otherwise bought the intellectual property in question. Often he or she would not have.) Copyright infringement is a civil offense, not criminal.

Now that we have that cleared up, what is the best and most ethical way to dispose of our now useless CDs?

(If I certify that I have destroyed them, will the RIAA issue me some certificate of licensed use of the IP contained on those CDs? No? So I have to keep a large and heavy mass of plastic to prove that I have a legal right to listen to this music? This does not seem reasonable.)

What I have done with some of my CDs is traded them on Lala.com. I don't know how active this aspect of lala is anymore, it's been a while since I've been active there. They facilitate 3 way trades for $1.75 including postage. You list the CDs you want to trade and make a list of the CDs you would like to receive in trade. They notify you if someone wants a CD you have, if you OK the trade, you get the address of the member to send the CD to. Then lala aranges for some other member to send you something on your want list. The cool part is that 20% or more of the income of the service goes to the artists involved in the traded CDs, and if these are not easy to find, then to a fund to provide health and retirement benefits to working musicians. Artists get no revenue from used CD sales in a record store in contrast.

So you trade for new music, the artists make more than they probably did on the original sale of their CD, and the RIAA gets nothing. Seems like a win win win to me. I should get back on there and trade some CDs.

I buy almost no CDs from retail outlets these days. When artists I'm interested in offer new material as lossless downloads, I eagerly support them and buy the music. I buy many CDs directly from artists at shows, because they receive a greater percentage of this sale.

The only CDs I keep in the house are ones with particularly interesting packaging (like Tool) or CDs by artists with whom I'm personally acquainted.

If the music industry would get hip and start offering what I want to buy, lossless music that doesn't come on a piece of plastic, I'll buy. Why are they so stupid? They have brought their downfall on themselves.