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Harald Walker
2004-06-07, 10:47
http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/

Featuring AirTunes for playing your iTunes music wirelessly on your home
stereo or powered speakers, AirPort Express brings not only the Internet
but your music to wherever in your home you like to enjoy them most
whether you use a Mac or Windows PC.

Well, it doesn't have a display or remote control and you'll need iTunes
to control it, so I am happy to have the Squeezebox.

Rob Wygand
2004-06-07, 11:19
> Well, it doesn't have a display or remote control and you'll need iTunes
> to control it, so I am happy to have the Squeezebox.

That's true. It has me drooling though, and I am a long-time, happy Slim
owner.

Jeffrey Gordon
2004-06-07, 11:34
I guess I am one of the few people in the world who does NOT like
iTunes. I think they charge WAY to much for poorly encoded music, and
the iTunes app never impressed me that much. But that is just my
personal view.

Thing that I really do not like about iTunes is no Linux support. Also
I like the command line, my music server does not need to run some
flashy app to server music.

Harald Walker wrote:

> http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/
>
> Featuring AirTunes for playing your iTunes music wirelessly on your home
> stereo or powered speakers, AirPort Express brings not only the Internet
> but your music to wherever in your home you like to enjoy them most
> whether you use a Mac or Windows PC.
>
> Well, it doesn't have a display or remote control and you'll need iTunes
> to control it, so I am happy to have the Squeezebox.
>
>
>

Ken Anderson
2004-06-07, 11:36
It interesting in the literature how they don't quite mention the fact
that you need to be in front of your computer to select your music.

On Jun 7, 2004, at 2:19 PM, Rob Wygand wrote:

> > Well, it doesn't have a display or remote control and you'll need
> iTunes
> > to control it, so I am happy to have the Squeezebox.
>
> That's true. It has me drooling though, and I am a long-time, happy
> Slim owner.
>
>

Harald Walker
2004-06-07, 11:50
Jeffrey Gordon wrote:

> I guess I am one of the few people in the world who does NOT like
> iTunes.

I guess you are talking about the iTunes Music Store.

> I think they charge WAY to much for poorly encoded music,

And force a limiting DRM upon you. (well Apple has no choice, since the
music industrie demands this kind of technologies).

But believe me, not even all Apple users love the iTMS. Am not waiting
for it to come to Europe and most likely will never spend a Euro there.
I have been buying online downloadable music at eMusic and bleep.com,
who both offer usually good quality mp3 files.

> and the iTunes app never impressed me that much. But that is just my
> personal view.

Well, I think iTunes is one of the nicest and most intuitive music
players out there.

> Thing that I really do not like about iTunes is no Linux support.

Apple lives from selling hardware and some software.

> Also I like the command line, my music server does not need to run
> some flashy app to server music.
>
This is also where I don't like Apple's digital hub strategy. I prefer a
small and simple, low energy home server. My music collections shouldn't
clutter up my power book and my wife would't be able to enjoy the music
when I am not home.

Regards,

Harald

jacobdp
2004-06-07, 13:22
On Mon, 07 Jun 2004 14:36:52 -0400, Ken Anderson <lists (AT) anderhome (DOT) com> wrote:
> It interesting in the literature how they don't quite mention the fact
> that you need to be in front of your computer to select your music.

Exactly. The VFD, remote, and OS support of the Squeezebox are worth
the $150 price difference, IMO.

The form factor seems wrong for a digital audio device, too. The whole
"small white rectangle" idea works great for the iPod, and possibly
for an 802.11 base station too, but I wouldn't want one sitting on my
stereo - it just doesn't look right.

Honestly, I would expect more from Apple...

Healy
2004-06-07, 13:39
On Mon, 2004-06-07 at 13:22, Jacob Potter wrote:
> The form factor seems wrong for a digital audio device, too. The whole
> "small white rectangle" idea works great for the iPod, and possibly
> for an 802.11 base station too, but I wouldn't want one sitting on my
> stereo - it just doesn't look right.
>
> Honestly, I would expect more from Apple...

Not trying to start a flame war in ANY way (I own, macs, sun boxes,
linux boxes and windows boxes myself...they are all tools to me).

I can see how this would be appealing to the same crowd that would buy
the iPod mini type of device. The less techo-toy people who just want
to hook their tunes into their stereo. I have no interest because the
squeezebox does the main function much better for my needs but I can see
why apple chose to go this route.

Jonathan Greene
2004-06-07, 13:52
in reading the threads on this one...

I think the main sell is to people would would not be looking at Slim
or other products... but rather think this is the Apple simple way...
which it is. It has less going for it than something separate like our
beloved slims, but certainly offers quite a bit of punch

On Jun 7, 2004, at 1:47 PM, Harald Walker wrote:

> http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/
>
> Featuring AirTunes for playing your iTunes music wirelessly on your
> home stereo or powered speakers, AirPort Express brings not only the
> Internet but your music to wherever in your home you like to enjoy
> them most whether you use a Mac or Windows PC.
>
> Well, it doesn't have a display or remote control and you'll need
> iTunes to control it, so I am happy to have the Squeezebox.
>
>
>

Steve Baumgarten
2004-06-07, 14:19
> I can see how this would be appealing to the same crowd that would buy
> the iPod mini type of device. The less techo-toy people who just want
> to hook their tunes into their stereo. I have no interest because the
> squeezebox does the main function much better for my needs but I can see
> why apple chose to go this route.

Sure, it's as simple as can be. You plug it directly into an electrical
outlet; you then plug an RCA cable from your stereo system directly into
it. That's it; it configures itself; it shows up in iTunes automatically.
Couldn't be easier.

Of course, as has been pointed out already, it looks like you can't
control it *at all* from your stereo/listening area. No remote; no web
interface. Nothing. You have to be in front of the Mac/PC running iTunes
to do anything, which is not very convenient and a big drawback, IMO.

I was going to note that it had no digital out, but on second look maybe
it does: it seems to support some sort of weird mini RCA->Toslink thing
from the same jack that supports direct RCA analog out.

http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/specs.html

Here's the text on it:

"The AirPort Express Stereo Connection Kit with Monster Cables includes
everything you need to get the most from AirPort Express: a Monster
mini-to-RCA left/right audio cable, a Monster mini-to-optical digital
Toslink audio cable and an AirPort Express power extension cord."

That sounds very weird. Can't find a mention of any such cable on
Monster's web site. Yet it looks like (see picture at the top of the
"specs" page) the Airport Express only has an ethernet jack, a USB port,
and a mini RCA jack. So could such a converter cable really exist? What
does the Airport Express output at that jack -- does it depend on whether
this cable is present or not, i.e., analong for normal RCA connections,
digital for this weird converter cable? Very weird, unless I'm missing
something very obvious.

Three good things the Squeezebox doesn't have:

o 802.11g
o WPA support
o Rendezvous (a.k.a. Zeroconf) for auto-configuration with iTunes on an
existing wireless network.

Speed, added security and ease of setup -- all distinct pluses. Not nearly
enough to outweigh its drawbacks (in comparison with the Squeezebox), but
definitely worth noting.

SBB

Donald B. Lagosz-Sinclair
2004-06-07, 14:46
Regarding the "mini-to-optical" connector: I believe this is the same
cable I use for digital copying between my MiniDisc Walkman and home deck
(or used to use, before the latter bought the dust).

Weird, but it works.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Baumgarten" <sbb (AT) panix (DOT) com>
To: "Slim Devices Discussion" <discuss (AT) lists (DOT) slimdevices.com>
Sent: Monday, June 07, 2004 5:19 PM
Subject: [slim] Apple introduces Airport Express


> > I can see how this would be appealing to the same crowd that would buy
> > the iPod mini type of device. The less techo-toy people who just want
> > to hook their tunes into their stereo. I have no interest because the
> > squeezebox does the main function much better for my needs but I can see
> > why apple chose to go this route.
>
> Sure, it's as simple as can be. You plug it directly into an electrical
> outlet; you then plug an RCA cable from your stereo system directly into
> it. That's it; it configures itself; it shows up in iTunes automatically.
> Couldn't be easier.
>
> Of course, as has been pointed out already, it looks like you can't
> control it *at all* from your stereo/listening area. No remote; no web
> interface. Nothing. You have to be in front of the Mac/PC running iTunes
> to do anything, which is not very convenient and a big drawback, IMO.
>
> I was going to note that it had no digital out, but on second look maybe
> it does: it seems to support some sort of weird mini RCA->Toslink thing
> from the same jack that supports direct RCA analog out.
>
> http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/specs.html
>
> Here's the text on it:
>
> "The AirPort Express Stereo Connection Kit with Monster Cables includes
> everything you need to get the most from AirPort Express: a Monster
> mini-to-RCA left/right audio cable, a Monster mini-to-optical digital
> Toslink audio cable and an AirPort Express power extension cord."
>
> That sounds very weird. Can't find a mention of any such cable on
> Monster's web site. Yet it looks like (see picture at the top of the
> "specs" page) the Airport Express only has an ethernet jack, a USB port,
> and a mini RCA jack. So could such a converter cable really exist? What
> does the Airport Express output at that jack -- does it depend on whether
> this cable is present or not, i.e., analong for normal RCA connections,
> digital for this weird converter cable? Very weird, unless I'm missing
> something very obvious.
>
> Three good things the Squeezebox doesn't have:
>
> o 802.11g
> o WPA support
> o Rendezvous (a.k.a. Zeroconf) for auto-configuration with iTunes on an
> existing wireless network.
>
> Speed, added security and ease of setup -- all distinct pluses. Not nearly
> enough to outweigh its drawbacks (in comparison with the Squeezebox), but
> definitely worth noting.
>
> SBB
>
>

Jim Noble
2004-06-07, 15:07
Harald Walker wrote:

> http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/
> Featuring AirTunes for playing your iTunes music wirelessly on your
> home stereo or powered speakers, AirPort Express brings not only the
> Internet but your music to wherever in your home you like to enjoy
> them most whether you use a Mac or Windows PC.
> Well, it doesn't have a display or remote control and you'll need
> iTunes to control it, so I am happy to have the Squeezebox.


Looks like it could be used to wireless-enable a slimp3 (several in
fact, if you can get enough bandwidth through the 54Mbps link). Just
what I need really...

Jim