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KMorgan
2009-04-16, 10:01
Hi

Thinking out loud here, so there are actually two questions. Any suggestions and advice welcome. I'm generally OK tech-wise once pointed in the correct direction and given enough time to digest the info.

I have 2x SBRs 1x SBC and soon will have a Boom. I have no issues with my wireless setup in the house. The only problem is that with the router positioned to give good coverage throughout the house reception in the garden is duff. Lots of stone walls etc.

Q1
If I just want to increase the wireless coverage to include the garden what's the best way?

Q2
I am considering using one of the SBRs and an amp as a dedicated source for a pair of external speakers on the back of the house. There would be no problem having this SBR in a wired configuration and close to the patio in question. If I do this can I use this SBR as a wireless bridge to allow the SBC to work in the garden?

Thanks for any suggestions.

Keith

Jeff Flowerday
2009-04-16, 10:18
If your house was wired I'd suggest a second access point on that end of the house with a directional attenna pointed out to the garden.

KMorgan
2009-04-16, 13:15
Jeff

Yes, that's probably the simplest. Tks

Keith

peterw
2009-04-16, 13:25
Q1: I've got a Linksys G router running Tomato firmware as my main AP. I added a second & configured it as a WDS helper, and it's been great for making the back yard a more hospitable place for wireless. What was very questionable is now very reliable. And my Controller roams between the APs just fine.

Gibbo
2009-04-16, 15:00
Hi
If I do this can I use this SBR as a wireless bridge to allow the SBC to work in the garden?



Just to check, you're not thinking that if you have the SBR wired in it'll pass on a wireless signal to your SBC? I'm not so sure this'll work. Maybe i'm wrong as I only have a couple of standard SB's but I thought the SBC communicated with you wireless network and SC rather than the actually receiver directly. The wireless bridge function of the SB is that it'll pick up a wireless network and pass it on to a wired device that is connected by a crossover cable.

If you want to do this you could buy a second wireless router as suggested above and use it as a bridge to provide an increase to your signal somewhere that improves your range outside.

Mick Seymour
2009-04-16, 23:06
I use a Linksys WRE54G wireless repeater for the garden. Its placed high on the internal wall in the room next to the garden and extends the wireless range perfectly. Don't believe what it says on the box about needing a Linksys wireless router to connect to; that's only for auto configuration. Manual configuration is dead simple.

You can use as many as you like to cover dead spots in and around the house.

In use, the Boom signal strength is 98% (more than when its on the indoor wireless network) and passes all the network test speeds. Even at 5000 I get an average throughput of 97%. These are the same figures I get when the Boom is on the wireless router so there is no down side at all with the repeater.

dave77
2009-04-17, 01:17
How about an extension lead and a couple of homeplugs

Mick Seymour
2009-04-17, 03:30
How about an extension lead and a couple of homeplugs

Won't allow the SBC to be used in the garden.

KMorgan
2009-04-17, 05:57
I think a range extender is definitely the way to go. Pretty obvious once I'd thought about it.

Q2 in the original post was prompted by this in the Duet use guide,

Bridged Network Configuration
This configuration should only be used if you do not have a wireless network
in your home. Your Squeezebox Receiver will be connected to your wired
ethernet network, and Squeezebox Controller will use an ad-hoc connection
to the Receiver for itís network connection.

As I said, just thinking out loud, if not clearly.

Thanks for the replies.

Keith

peterw
2009-04-17, 06:04
Even at 5000 I get an average throughput of 97%. These are the same figures I get when the Boom is on the wireless router so there is no down side at all with the repeater.

At least for audio. I think most of these WDS/extender schemes cut wlan bandwidth in half for every "repeater hop" a client is dealing with, e.g. a laptop in the garden would have half the bandwidth to your server that it would have if associating with the main AP, but for streaming audio on a wireless G network that's not a problem.

dave77
2009-04-17, 06:54
Won't allow the SBC to be used in the garden.

True! I was thinking about the Boom and I have a small garden so would stretch myself to walk to the Boom rather than use the Controller. Could always put the wireless extender thingy off the homeplug.

KMorgan
2009-04-20, 10:50
I've managed to get Virgin Media to send me a free wireless router. It should arrive tomorrow and I'm expecting it to be a Netgear WG614 as shown on this page http://allyours.virginmedia.com/html/internet/wireless.html#grouter

Can any of you techies out there give me some advice on if/how this can be set up as an additional access point at the far end of the house? There is no problem running an ethernet cable to it from the present router, a Belkin 54g Cable/DSL Gateway router of ~2002-ish vintage. The Belkin is working just fine as-is.

Thanks folks.

Keith

Mick Seymour
2009-04-20, 11:34
This will be a similar setup to my own, so in theory ...

On the new router:

1. Configure the WAN side to use DHCP. It won't really matter as there's nothing going to be connected there but that's what I did on mine.

2. Give it a local static IP address in the same IP range as your existing network but not one within the existing routers DHCP range.

3. Turn off DHCP.

4. Configure wireless networking with a different SSID AND different channel to the existing router.

5. If it has a choice of operating mode between router and gateway, as my Linksys has, set it to router.

6. Connect an Ethernet cable from a LAN port to a LAN port on your existing router. The cable may need to be crossed; it depends on whether either router is auto sensing.

On the SB:

1. Configure wireless access to the new router's SSID.

That, I think, should do it.

KMorgan
2009-04-20, 13:02
Mick

Thanks for that. With what you have said and some more googling I'm beginning to get a feel for what I need to do. I'm trying to get as much info together as possible before this latest "5 minute" job.

Just one Q though. Once set up does the SBC, Boom or whatever transfer seamlessly, and transparently, between access points and channels? Or do you have to make any further selections on the Squeeze device?

Keith

RalphO
2009-04-20, 13:35
I think a range extender is definitely the way to go. Pretty obvious once I'd thought about it.

Q2 in the original post was prompted by this in the Duet use guide,

Bridged Network Configuration
This configuration should only be used if you do not have a wireless network
in your home. Your Squeezebox Receiver will be connected to your wired
ethernet network, and Squeezebox Controller will use an ad-hoc connection
to the Receiver for itís network connection.

As I said, just thinking out loud, if not clearly.

Thanks for the replies.

Keith

Keith

I bought a Netgear Range extender a few years ago and it is placed in my attic. It gives very good wireless strength in the garden.

I recommend it.

Mick Seymour
2009-04-20, 22:57
Once set up does the SBC, Boom or whatever transfer seamlessly, and transparently, between access points and channels? Or do you have to make any further selections on the Squeeze device?

As you'll have different SSIDs on each router, the SB devices will need reconfiguring to switch between access points. If you make the SSIDs 1 character different as the first character of the name with both routers using the same WPA key, a manual changeover will be quick.

I don't know what will happen if you set up the same SSID/channel/security on both routers. They may interfere with each other because of their close proximity like neighbours routers on their default settings can. I may be wrong on that though as I've not tried it. If it DOES work, I don't know if the SBC will switch between access points automatically. A wireless extender (which by definition HAS the same SSID/channel/security) won't help in this situation. It depends on whether the SBC is designed to follow the strongest signal.

chill
2009-04-21, 00:40
For a while I had my wireless router and a separate wireless access point (wired into the router) both set up with different SSIDs on different channels. This gave me good coverage in the house, but wasn't as transparent as I wanted it to be for everyone in the household - there were the occasional questions from younger family members about why their internet wasn't working - a result of their laptops trying to connect to an SSID that was out of range.

I wanted a setup similar to the wireless environment where I work - one SSID and one set of security settings, which work wherever I am on the campus. I did a fair amount of experimenting, and have finally settled on giving both wireless access points the *SAME SSID AND CHANNEL NUMBER* (and security/password settings). I'm not convinced it is totally correct to use the same channel number, as there is much conflicting advice on the internet (perhaps I'm just contributing to it!), but it seems to work well for me. I used iStumbler (on my MacBook) to find a suitable channel number with the lowest interference everywhere in the house. This turned out NOT to be the default channel number, which various of my neighbours seem to be using.

With this setup, each roaming device in the household only needs to know about one SSID. When it is booted up it will connect to the strongest AP signal.

Since the Boom is inevitably powered down when moved between locations (due to the mains requirement), when it boots up it finds the best AP. For true roaming devices, I have an iPhone, which is analagous to your SBC in this case, and it roams between the APs fairly well. Very occasionally it seems to hang on to the weaker signal when it would be better to swap to the nearer AP, but quickly toggling the WiFi on and off cures that.

agillis
2009-04-21, 07:03
Wifi coverage is based on a lot of factors. One of the most important is the height of the transmitter from the ground. I moved my access point from my first floor to my second and x10 the range. So try these in order.

1. move your wifi router to the highest point possible. This costs you nothing and may get you the range.

2. if that doesn't work. Buy larger antennas for your router. These usually increase the range quite a bit.

3. if you still don't get the strength you need by an access point and put it near you garden or in your attic.

You may also want to think about a NAS like VortexBox. You can use the internal sound card as a zone. VortexBox runs squeezeslave buy default so the internal sound card acts like an SB. Run the sound card to an amp and then to the outside speekers.