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jehma
2009-03-08, 11:09
I have a Boom and I love it. I want to buy a second SB to put in my family room plugged into my stereo, but I have to have headphone capability for listening to while working out. I thought the Duet would be good for this (and the controller is just so cool :) ), but it looks like there are problems with it? Is the Classic my only choice to be able to use headphones reliably? I know I could buy a second Boom, but I would rather hook this one up to my existing stereo.

Thanks!

ETA: I just saw the info about editing the controller files to enable the headphones. I'm a s/w developer and could probably manage this :) Are the headphones reliable afterwards? It's a necessary feature for me.

MeSue
2009-03-08, 11:56
The headphone jack on the Controller is still a beta feature at this time. Whichever one you buy, you can still use the headphones through your stereo if the Controller turns out to not work for you. I have had no trouble with it, personally.

Mnyb
2009-03-08, 12:09
Why not a classic paired with a controller, thats my favorite combination.

Moonbase
2009-03-08, 15:41
I originally orderd the SB3, but eventually ended up with the Duet. If you have a stable WLAN, the Controller is really a cool device — I can read it without glasses (need those for the SB3), it has so much more functionality (i.e., controlling volume from another room, controlling ALL SB devices you have, reading news, ...)

Admittedly, it still has some (minor) problems with both usable network bandwidth and headphones, but I’m sure these will all be gone soon with software changes — it’s a small Linux computer anyway :-)

I never needed the "headphones patch" after controller firmware r4154, btw. It still stutters sometimes, so its not yet the "perfect" headphone playing device, but I have trust (since it seems to be a problem related to energy saving which can be cured in software).

So I’d say "Yes", having at least one controller with any of your SqueezeBoxen, Transporter, Booms is a great choice.

cooppw02
2009-03-08, 21:21
Keep in mind that if you've got LAME installed, you can point certain wireless devices at stream.mp3 and listen in that way...

ModelCitizen
2009-03-09, 13:50
Judging by the duet forum, if it works for you you'll love it, if it does not you'll waste a lot of time, rant and then sell it. As a software developer (and therefore techie?) you have an advantage over many of the target market.

MC

Moonbase
2009-03-09, 19:02
Definitely true. The SB product range introduces lots of very new and previously unknown technical stuff into the world of the audio lover. Not everyone might want to/be able to cope with that.

Then again, I believe itís a path into the (audio) future, and a good one. Who ever thought a few years ago that some funny digital silverling could be as good as a vinyl record? Who ever believed that real true fidelity sound would ever come out of a PC?

Fortunately, all this techie stuff becomes easier to use every week and many helpful and knowledgeable people are around. Our children will probably not know anything else anymore, like the little girl that asked her father "Dad, why are those CDs SO big and BLACK? Arenít they supposed to be smaller and silver?" when I was selling some of my singles on a flea market :-)

Pros and cons :-)

ModelCitizen
2009-03-10, 00:53
Who ever thought a few years ago that some funny digital silverling could be as good as a vinyl record?
I don't think it would be wise to say that in the Audiophile forum.

MC

Dogberry2
2009-03-10, 06:55
I don't think it would be wise to say that in the Audiophile forum.Yes, sometimes wisdom is not welcome in some places. ;)

Phil Leigh
2009-03-10, 09:55
Yes, sometimes wisdom is not welcome in some places. ;)
Oh I don't know... I happen to think that SB+DAC replay walks all over vinyl. It was a happy day when I sold my serious vinyl rig (and serious collection of rare and precious vinyl...£100 for a 7" single anyone?)

To me the issue is that the quality of recordings in general (there are exceptions) has declined in the last 20 years - regardless of storage media.