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Kyle
2009-02-28, 04:55
I have a Linksys WRT54GL router. Can I assign a static IP address to my Squeezeserver without having static IP's for everything on the network? Is it difficult?

aubuti
2009-02-28, 07:15
I have a Linksys WRT54GL router. Can I assign a static IP address to my Squeezeserver without having static IP's for everything on the network? Is it difficult?
I have the same router, but use Tomato instead of the stock firmware. Setting "static DHCP" is easy with that firmware. All you have to do is assign an IP address outside of the normal DHCP range to the MAC address (hardware address) of the network card on your server. I don't remember if it is equally easy or more difficult with the stock firmware.

Another, potentially better, approach is to set a true static IP in the network settings of your server itself. How you do that depends on the OS. And yes, it's no problem at all having some devices with fixed IPs and some using DHCP. Just make sure that you set the static IPs to addresses that are outside the range of addresses that your router doles out via DHCP.

Kyle
2009-02-28, 09:24
Another, potentially better, approach is to set a true static IP in the network settings of your server itself. How you do that depends on the OS. And yes, it's no problem at all having some devices with fixed IPs and some using DHCP. Just make sure that you set the static IPs to addresses that are outside the range of addresses that your router doles out via DHCP.
My server is on Windows XP. Can you tell me what steps to take?

aubuti
2009-02-28, 09:39
My server is on Windows XP. Can you tell me what steps to take?
This is what I have on WinXP Pro:
1. Start > Control Panel > Network Connections
2. Select the appropriate connection (wired/wireless) and right click for "Properties"
3. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
4. Select "Properties"
5. Under "General" tab, choose "Use the following IP address", then specify
IP address: the IP address you want to use. The first three parts should be the same as the address of your router (typically either 192.168.0 or 192.168.1). The last part must not already be in use, and should be outside the range of DHCP addresses that your router assigns.
Subnet mask: use 255.255.255.0
Default gateway: the IP address of your router, typically 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1

Kyle
2009-02-28, 14:46
Thanks. Perfect instructions!

Kyle
2009-02-28, 18:34
EXCEPT: Now my desktop can't get on the internet. I still can through my laptop. Do I have to change a router setting to allow the desktop to access the internet?

agillis
2009-02-28, 21:01
Did you set your DNS servers as well? You need to set them to the ones you were getting from DHCP or to a good high speed free DNS service like OpenDNS

OpenDNS DNS servers
208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220

I use openDNS because it is quite a bit faster then the DNS server provided by me internet provider.

Kyle
2009-03-01, 06:17
No, I didn't. How many do I need? Can you explain what those setting do?

EDIT: OK, I tried this, using the DNS servers in your post. I could access the internet, but my music would not play. I could access the server, and everything looked fine. I could change songs, hit play, hit stop, etc. But the music did not actually play. Any ideas?

aubuti
2009-03-01, 08:14
No, I didn't. How many do I need? Can you explain what those setting do?

EDIT: OK, I tried this, using the DNS servers in your post. I could access the internet, but my music would not play. I could access the server, and everything looked fine. I could change songs, hit play, hit stop, etc. But the music did not actually play. Any ideas?
How were you controlling the server, via the web ui or via the SB? Have you told your SBs to connect to the server, which may now have a different IP address from what it had before?

Kyle
2009-03-01, 10:27
How were you controlling the server, via the web ui or via the SB? Have you told your SBs to connect to the server, which may now have a different IP address from what it had before?From the host computer, a laptop and the SB. When the music wasn't playing in the post above, from the host computer I could see the playlist on the player in the den, so apparently it was logged in, I just couldn't get music to play. I could manipulate the playlist, etc., and though the UI said a song was playing, no music came through the system.

aubuti
2009-03-01, 10:45
From the host computer, a laptop and the SB. When the music wasn't playing in the post above, from the host computer I could see the playlist on the player in the den, so apparently it was logged in, I just couldn't get music to play. I could manipulate the playlist, etc., and though the UI said a song was playing, no music came through the system.
I don't see how lack of sound can have anything to do with your static/dynamic IP or other network settings. If you can control the server with the SB and the SB is showing that something is playing (either via elapsed time or VU meters) then you're 99.9% of the way there. Time to check (and/or re-check) the obvious: volume settings on your SB and amp (including the mute on the amp), the source/input setting on your receiver/amp, the physical connections between the SB and the rest of your audio, etc. Can you hear anything if you plug headphones into the SB (assuming you're not talking about a SBR)?

carp
2009-03-03, 04:14
OK, I tried this, using the DNS servers in your post. I could access the internet, but my music would not play. I could access the server, and everything looked fine.

You should set the DNS address of your desktop to the address of your router.

IMHO in most cases the router gets the address(es) of internet DNS server(s) when it establishes a connection to the internet/your internet provider. This way it is able to translate names to IP addresses. In your LAN, the router acts as a local DNS to translate the names of your LAN devices to (local) IP addresses, so your LAN devices can talk with each other. If the router cannot find a name in your LAN (i.e. you typed a www address into the address line of your web browser), it asks the internet DNS server to translate this name to an IP address. In short: The DNS of your router is needed on the one hand to allow your local devices to find each other and on the other hand to let you find other systems in the internet. So IMHO it is reasonable to set the DNS server address of your local devices to the address of your router.

Kyle
2009-03-03, 08:14
You should set the DNS address of your desktop to the address of your router.


OK, assuming I use the two DNS addresses listed a few posts ago, how do I go about this?

Mark Lanctot
2009-03-03, 08:29
OK, assuming I use the two DNS addresses listed a few posts ago, how do I go about this?

You say your OS is Windows XP. Go to Start - Settings - Network Connections (although Network Connections might be in Control Panel) - (select your network interface) - in the "This connection uses the following items:" list, scroll down to "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)", double click or highlight and select Properties. On the bottom section, select the "Use the following DNS server addresses:" radio button and set the DNS addresses in the list below.

You can add more DNS addresses in the "Advanced - DNS" section. It will use the DNS servers in the list, going through them in order until it gets one that works. So a good idea would be to put your router first, then your local ISP DNS servers, then the OpenDNS servers listed in this thread.

Kyle
2009-03-03, 12:31
You can add more DNS addresses in the "Advanced - DNS" section. It will use the DNS servers in the list, going through them in order until it gets one that works. So a good idea would be to put your router first, then your local ISP DNS servers, then the OpenDNS servers listed in this thread.

Where do I find my ISP DNS addresses? I'm not at home now, but it seems like they weren't actually displayed it was just an option to automatically use them. Also, where do I found my router DNS? And, finally, if I put the router DNS first, as suggested above, will my SB automatically find it and log in or do I have to change the setup on the box as well?

Mark Lanctot
2009-03-03, 12:39
Where do I find my ISP DNS addresses?

Usually your router automatically grabs them from your ISP. They should be listed somewhere in your router's status pages.


I'm not at home now, but it seems like they weren't actually displayed it was just an option to automatically use them.

Right, Windows conveniently hides them. :-P

If you do want to see them, go to Start - Programs - Accessories - Command Prompt and type "ipconfig /all".


Also, where do I found my router DNS?

Just type in the address of your router. It's acting as your DNS server for all devices in your home you connect to it.


And, finally, if I put the router DNS first, as suggested above, will my SB automatically find it and log in or do I have to change the setup on the box as well?

Wait, I thought we were talking about your desktop? If we're talking about the SB, as soon as you complete network setup, it uses it and should work. Same thing with the Windows changes here, after you click OK it should work.