PDA

View Full Version : SBR and signal strength



roll - gybe
2009-01-22, 09:29
Hey guys, I added an SBR to my network of SB3s.
I am running it wirelessly over wireless-b. I have 2 ethernet wired SB3s and one running on the wireless-g upstairs.

The SBR has 73%-75% signal strength, and it stutters like crazy. It stutters with FLAC, AAC, MP3 256, and S/N.

Is this at all normal?

I tested the SBR upstairs in my main stereo. Over a powerline AV connector on a different floor, no problem. Wirelessly connected near the wireless-g router no problem.

I am not sure what to think.

Here is one option, but I don't know how I would execute:

When I use the SBR is when I am in my office. When I am in my office, I have my computer in my office. I use wireless in my office because it is on the other side of the house from the router. I prefer to hook into my main wireless-g router. (SBR gets 35% off that one, which has a different address and channel) Can I hook up my wireless-b in my office without an internet connection to connect my computer to the SBR (computer still hooked up to the wireless-g for internet)? If so will I be able to use S/N? \

I guess I asked 2 questions:
-is my SBR behavior normal?
-can i jump from the sbr right onto my pc?

trying not to go buy more network rubble.

Thanks guys
Tom

Mark Lanctot
2009-01-22, 09:41
I am running it wirelessly over wireless-b.

Why? Ideally, 802.11b should work, but in practice it's borderline for most tasks these days.


When I use the SBR is when I am in my office. When I am in my office, I have my computer in my office. I use wireless in my office because it is on the other side of the house from the router. I prefer to hook into my main wireless-g router. (SBR gets 35% off that one, which has a different address and channel) Can I hook up my wireless-b in my office without an internet connection to connect my computer to the SBR (computer still hooked up to the wireless-g for internet)? If so will I be able to use S/N?

Why do you want to use your old 802.11b router? Sure, I'm all for reusing old hardware and keeping it out of landfills, but 802.11b is not very useful these days. To re-use it and keep it out of a landfill, use the wired ports as a network switch and turn the wireless module off...

Presumably your office computer has a wired network interface in addition to wireless. You can then wire your SBR off this and select bridging or Internet Connection Sharing to bridge the SBR to the computer's wireless interface.


trying not to go buy more network rubble.

802.11b routers are "network rubble" these days. Use the wired ports as network switches though.

And 802.11g routers are very cheap right now, but if you bridge your wireless-wired interfaces, you shouldn't need to get one.

roll - gybe
2009-01-22, 09:53
Mark, thanks for your detailed response.
In fact, my home office has no wired connection. I connect through my faint, but effective wireless-g network.

My office is on a lower floor, across the house from the wireless-g router. I have a SB3 wired down on the lower level, but is is also on the opposite side of the house.

Before spending more money on powerline adaptors and otherwise worthless stuff, I wanted to try my old wireless B router as an access point.

I reset the configuration, and hooked my ethernet line near my SB3 into it. I plugged my SB3 into a port, and hooked the SBR up to it wirelessly. I tried hooking my computer to it wirelessly, and my internet connection works no problem. For the sake of continuity, I switched my computer back to the G network after the test.

So that is the set-up. I am really just trying to be smart and not spend another hundred bucks when I have all these devices laying around the house.

Mark Lanctot
2009-01-22, 10:08
In fact, my home office has no wired connection. I connect through my faint, but effective wireless-g network.

What I was suggesting was to use the wired network interface on your office computer. You indicate this connects wirelessly. Most computers also have a wired interface. I assume this is not used on your office computer.

But you can "bridge" the wired to the wireless network interface using something Windows calls "Internet Connection Sharing". You then wire your SBR to this wired port, enable ICS, and traffic to/from the SBR is "bridged" over to the wireless interface, which you indicate is working. Also if your office computer has Internet access, you will have SqueezeNetwork access on your SBR as well.


Before spending more money on powerline adaptors and otherwise worthless stuff, I wanted to try my old wireless B router as an access point.

It'll work OK under ideal conditions - but real-life isn't ideal! Yes, you can reuse it - its best use would be as a wired-only switch.

If you can bridge the office computer's wired and wireless network interfaces, it should work without you having to buy anything aside from a single Ethernet cable, which may have been included with one of your routers. If not, it's available anywhere for a few dollars.


I reset the configuration, and hooked my ethernet line near my SB3 into it. I plugged my SB3 into a port, and hooked the SBR up to it wirelessly. I tried hooking my computer to it wirelessly, and my internet connection works no problem. For the sake of continuity, I switched my computer back to the G network after the test.

I don't understand what you're saying. What's "it" and which port are you plugging into?

It probably doesn't matter, try the bridging thing first.


So that is the set-up. I am really just trying to be smart and not spend another hundred bucks when I have all these devices laying around the house.

You don't have to spend anything. And for the record, I do like reusing equipment when possible but it doesn't look like your 802.11b router can be used in this configuration. Keep it around, you can use it as a switch.

roll - gybe
2009-01-22, 12:36
Thanks for your response, Mark.
I will have to read your comments closely. I don't have experience with the bridging functionality, so I will have to investigate. Thanks for the time.

ozbrit
2009-01-22, 14:17
An interesting thread to me I have a dynalink RTE 1025 wireless modem router with my SB3 located across the house with a signal of 25%, any radio station with a bitrate greater than 160kbps also stutters and carries on, would that be down to too low a reception signal?

rainjacks
2009-01-22, 14:18
He is saying to plug the SBR into the wired interface on the computer. Using the bridging feature on the computer the SBR will then be able to access the rest of the network through the computers wireless G interface.

Note: This doesn't mean I necessarily agree with this scenario. I have all of my SBR's wired so I have no frame of reference on the wireless performance.

Mark Lanctot
2009-01-23, 06:43
An interesting thread to me I have a dynalink RTE 1025 wireless modem router with my SB3 located across the house with a signal of 25%, any radio station with a bitrate greater than 160kbps also stutters and carries on, would that be down to too low a reception signal?

25% is too low, and if you're getting issues over 160 kbps that's an indication. You can always use the built-in network tests, see http://wiki.slimdevices.com/index.php/Diagnosing_Performance_Issues


Note: This doesn't mean I necessarily agree with this scenario. I have all of my SBR's wired so I have no frame of reference on the wireless performance.

You're right, it's not ideal. It will require the computer to be on, and it will require Windows wireless networking capabilities, which IMHO are still half-baked (mine always fights with my manufacturer-specific wireless software).

Under normal conditions wireless can work fine. There may be issues with 802.11b, interference-heavy environments, specific house construction materials and long distances.