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sgumnit
2009-01-13, 16:39
I know I should rip to FLAC but long ago I ripped my CDs using Windows Media Player.

I am getting a new computer using Vista. When I move my .wav files, is there a corresponding library or list that indexes the album art that also needs to be moved and if so, where is it on XP?

Also, I notice that some of my .wav files when played through the duet, the More Info display within the controller states:
Bit rate 1411 kbps CBR (converted to 705.6kbps ABR)

Have I lost sound quality?

snarlydwarf
2009-01-13, 17:32
I know I should rip to FLAC but long ago I ripped my CDs using Windows Media Player.

I am getting a new computer using Vista. When I move my .wav files, is there a corresponding library or list that indexes the album art that also needs to be moved and if so, where is it on XP?

Doesn't Windows just put it in the folder with the music as Folder.jpg?

Never trusted WMP to rip, but thats what Windows Explorer shows as icons.



Also, I notice that some of my .wav files when played through the duet, the More Info display within the controller states:
Bit rate 1411 kbps CBR (converted to 705.6kbps ABR)

Have I lost sound quality?

Nope.

SC is smart: if it sees wav, it will, by default, transcode to FLAC to use less bandwith (which may be crucial on wireless). FLAC is lossless (like ZIP: if ZIP was lossy, every spreadsheet would break when mailed... a single bit difference and everything from that point on is lost) so the quality is exactly the same.

You may want to encode your music as FLAC instead of WAV: this will allow tagging (WAVs have no real tags, just some hackery that may or may not work) instead of trying to guess things from directory paths.

sgumnit
2009-01-13, 18:34
Thanks for the info on the bit rate.

Also - You wrote "Doesn't Windows just put it in the folder with the music as Folder.jpg?"

Ultimately, that is what I trying to find out. Does this file exist? If so, what is it called so that I can ensure I transfer it to the new computer.

And yes, in the future FLAC will be the encoding choice going forward.

aubuti
2009-01-13, 18:57
And yes, in the future FLAC will be the encoding choice going forward.
You may already be aware of this, but just in case... you can easily encode your WAV files to FLAC without re-ripping. There are several tools that will do this for you, and if your folder/filename structure is good some tools will even write reasonable tags for you.

moley6knipe
2009-01-14, 08:19
WMP stores the cover art in four jpeg files within the rip's folder. You'll need to set your folder options to show you hidden and system files.

Stupid, but there it is.

Once you've found your art, just copy the highest res one in each folder and call it folder.jpg (non-hidden, non-system). You can leave the hidden ones that WMP added there, it won't make any difference to SC AFAIK.

Pain to do en masse though.

When you move your files, you'll need to make sure that both machines are set to show hidden and system files as well. They seem to move between machines ok.

And longer term, seriously consider moving to a lossless compression and these sort of problems go away!

To be honest with a good ripper you'll probably find it quicker to re-rip than to convert and tag from scratch.

dBpoweramp is fast, as accurate a ripper as it can manage with your discs, and it's cover art and meta-data is superb. Costs though.

sgumnit
2009-01-14, 09:06
Thanks for the good info and advice. Yeah, I am just going to pull all my files within the folder that contains all my music since it has the artwork file, hidden or not...I am hoping that will maintain the artwork's association with the .WAV files. Next step is to convert all of them to FLAC using the suggested software. If this conversion software can pull the artwork from the web or read the window media player's artwork file; great....however, I can live without artwork. I am not going to manually add artwork for thousands of CDs...unless I get really, really really bored.