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jtfields
2008-09-09, 15:18
I recently purchased a ReadyNAS so that I can access my music collection on a Squeezebox without a computer on. I have not even taken the ReadyNAS out of the box yet and have never used one so this may be a dumb question. I'm assuming the Boom gets its time from the computer running SqueezeCenter. Does the ReadyNAS have an internal clock for the Boom as well?

soxfan
2008-09-09, 19:05
The ReadyNAS is essentially a "computer". It has a proprietary CPU, but runs a modified version of Debian Linux. And yes, it does have a clock that is used by the Squeezecenter.

Just a heads up. I don't want to scare you away from this setup, but don't expect the greatest performance out of Squeezecenter running on the ReadyNAS, especially if you have a large music collection. I think you may find the that navigating through the menus, both with the web interface and on the Boom itself may be a bit sluggish.

pfarrell
2008-09-09, 19:21
soxfan wrote:
> The ReadyNAS is essentially a "computer". It has a proprietary CPU, but
> runs a modified version of Debian Linux. And yes, it does have a clock
> that is used by the Squeezecenter.

Minor nit, its not a propriatary CPU, Its just not a usual Intel/AMD cpu
that PCs have.

Its not essentially a computer. It is a computer. Its a computer tuned
to be a file server.


> Just a heads up. I don't want to scare you away from this setup, but
> don't expect the greatest performance out of Squeezecenter running on
> the ReadyNAS, especially if you have a large music collection.

I think this is an understatement, most of the folks using underpowered
NAS systems complain about performance, whereas nearly any PC is more
than enough to run SqueezeCenter quite well.

Pat

dwilliams01
2008-09-09, 19:50
Take 1 old computer, and one external usb drive. 15 minutes and you have the equiv. of a NAS with a bit more flexibility and probably performace. Easier maintenance, as well, because there isn't anything "extra" or specific to learn (I use Windows XP for it).

I stuck mine in the basement in the furnace room and didn't even bother to hook up a monitor or keyboard for months because I could remote connect to it from any other computer in the house as needed.

jtfields
2008-09-09, 20:14
Ouch. These aren't the types of responses I was expecting. I can't return the ReadyNAS and it wasn't cheap. I'm surprised to hear this since Slim Devices used to sell ReadyNAS/Squeezebox bundles.

Would the performance be okay using the ReadyNAS to store my music collection and then running SqueezeCenter on a separate PC? In other words, is it an issue with the performance of the ReadyNAS running SqueezeCenter or is it also a performance issue with ability of the ReadyNAS to stream the data?

By the way, in case it matters, my collection is about 80GB or so.

pfarrell
2008-09-09, 20:36
jtfields wrote:
> Would the performance be okay using the ReadyNAS to store my music
> collection and then running SqueezeCenter on a separate PC?

There have been very good reports of folks using exactly this.
And the PC doesn't have to be anything special. Any reject that use
replaced with a newer PC usually works. Plus, the reject PC is usually
cheap, since its sitting in a closet someplace.

dean
2008-09-09, 21:57
The 7.2.1 pre-release nightly builds have some substantial performance
improvements that should make ReadyNAS more responsive. If you have a
ReadyNAS and are willing to try out pre-release software, I can
recommend it.

damager
2008-09-10, 07:07
Ouch. These aren't the types of responses I was expecting. I can't return the ReadyNAS and it wasn't cheap. I'm surprised to hear this since Slim Devices used to sell ReadyNAS/Squeezebox bundles.

Would the performance be okay using the ReadyNAS to store my music collection and then running SqueezeCenter on a separate PC? In other words, is it an issue with the performance of the ReadyNAS running SqueezeCenter or is it also a performance issue with ability of the ReadyNAS to stream the data?

By the way, in case it matters, my collection is about 80GB or so.

I had a REadyNAS with SqueezeCenter and didn't have any major issues. Your library isn't insanely large (mine is currently 400GB), so I'm guessing you will be OK. Try the newest version, as Dean suggests - since you cant return it you have nothing to lose by trying it out.

radish
2008-09-10, 07:51
Just an FYI - SC doesn't care how much space your library takes up, all that really matters is the number of tracks. So saying "I have 15k tracks" is a more useful comparison point than "I have 200GB of music". The ratio can vary wildly depending on encoding format and average track length.

Dogberry2
2008-09-10, 08:47
I read a lot of posts about how the ReadyNAS is likely to have performance problems with SC, and maybe for some people that's true, but my set up (NV+ running SC, with somewhere around 6000 tracks from CDs ripped to FLAC and another couple thousand MP3s I acquired from wherever over the years) works just fine. I've been completely satisfied with it. I have streamed to as many as 5 devices (Duet receivers and PCs around the house) simultaneously, synchronized or playing independent playlists, with no problem. The Duet controller is very responsive; I most often scroll through by artist, but haven't had any response problems scrolling through the album list, or doing searches (which I rarely do, actually). My ReadyNAS is new, though, and running the latest production-level firmware (I typically don't use betas); maybe in the early days there were bigger performance problems that have since been corrected. Or maybe I'm just one of the lucky ones. But if you already have the ReadyNAS, it's certainly worth trying it, I think.

soxfan
2008-09-10, 08:53
Minor nit, its not a propriatary CPU, Its just not a usual Intel/AMD cpu
that PCs have.

Its not essentially a computer. It is a computer. Its a computer tuned
to be a file server.
You know, I thought about whether I should say "proprietary" or "non-Intel/AMD", and chose the former. Guess I made the wrong choice :)

My choice of the word "essentially" was based on the fact that I think many people refer to a computer as something you plug a keyboard, monitor, and mouse into, and you don't do that with a ReadyNAS (at least not the ones I've worked with). In fact, you don't even get command prompt/shell access to the system unless you install additional software. But your point is taken; it is a computer.

SuperQ
2008-09-10, 15:49
You know, I thought about whether I should say "proprietary" or "non-Intel/AMD", and chose the former. Guess I made the wrong choice :)

My choice of the word "essentially" was based on the fact that I think many people refer to a computer as something you plug a keyboard, monitor, and mouse into, and you don't do that with a ReadyNAS (at least not the ones I've worked with). In fact, you don't even get command prompt/shell access to the system unless you install additional software. But your point is taken; it is a computer.

Actually, it kinda is a proprietary CPU. The classic ReadyNAS CPU is Infrant's own implementation of OpenSparc. The newer ReadyNAS Pro (post-netgear) are Intel based. (Celeron I think)

jtfields
2008-09-10, 20:06
The 7.2.1 pre-release nightly builds have some substantial performance
improvements that should make ReadyNAS more responsive. If you have a
ReadyNAS and are willing to try out pre-release software, I can
recommend it.


I will certainly give it a try. What do I have ot lose? The unit I have only has 256MB RAM so I'm ordering a 1GB stick from Newegg in the hopes that it will help as well.

jtfields
2008-09-10, 20:08
Just an FYI - SC doesn't care how much space your library takes up, all that really matters is the number of tracks. <snip> The ratio can vary wildly depending on encoding format and average track length.

Of course you are right. Everything is VBR MP3s. Total number of tracks is close to 13,000 I believe.