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seanadams
2004-04-05, 09:03
> Sean,
>
> Two questions...
>
> 1. Is this fixed in the refurbed Slimp3's that were just offered at
> the reduced price?
>

Yes.

> 2. Are you the guy that wrote the 95th percentile add-on for MRTG?
>

Yes - a long time ago! Also added some new stuff recently for the ip2k
processor that's used in Squeezebox:

http://www.seanadams.com/ip2k

Daryle A. Tilroe
2004-04-05, 14:54
Sean Adams wrote:

> Yes - a long time ago! Also added some new stuff recently for the ip2k
> processor that's used in Squeezebox:
>
> http://www.seanadams.com/ip2k

Cool. This has those inside photos I was wondering about.
Of course now I have found this link too:

http://www.slimdevices.com/images/inside_squeezebox/

Now I don't have to bother cracking my case :-). So I
didn't notice a discrete EEPROM, socketed or otherwise.
I suppose this answers my previous question. It's either
integrated or a less common SMT type rather than the
ubiquitous 32 pin DIP or PLCC.

On a different note. I think I asked this before but don't
remember it being answered unequivocally. Is that just a
standard PCMCIA wireless card that could be upgraded to
802.11a or g? I think I remember some statement about the
'hardware' being incompatible. Can anyone elaborate on
what that means? Is it 16 bit vs 32 bit or the 3.3V 16 bit
or what?


--
Daryle A. Tilroe

seanadams
2004-04-05, 14:59
> Now I don't have to bother cracking my case :-). So I
> didn't notice a discrete EEPROM, socketed or otherwise.

There is flash inside the ip2k as well as externally (the SST part).
The ip2k is programmed through the 10-pin header on the left of the
board, using a JTAG-like interface. The external flash is programmed by
the ip2k.

> I suppose this answers my previous question. It's either
> integrated or a less common SMT type rather than the
> ubiquitous 32 pin DIP or PLCC.

Actually the SST39VF020 external flash is *very* standard and can be
programmed in any flash programmer (if it weren't soldered to the
board). For example, this is the same part you'll find for the BIOS
chip on a PC motherboard.

>
> On a different note. I think I asked this before but don't
> remember it being answered unequivocally. Is that just a
> standard PCMCIA wireless card that could be upgraded to
> 802.11a or g?

It's PCMCIA, not cardbus.

Daryle A. Tilroe
2004-04-05, 21:18
Sean Adams wrote:

> Daryle Tilroe wrote:
>
>> I suppose this answers my previous question. It's either
>> integrated or a less common SMT type rather than the
>> ubiquitous 32 pin DIP or PLCC.
>
> Actually the SST39VF020 external flash is *very* standard and can be
> programmed in any flash programmer (if it weren't soldered to the

True I'm sure, but then I would have to buy another adapter for my
programmer. :) I suppose the smaller pitch parts are the standard
today, particularly when space is at a premium. I have done
my share of nasty desoldering though, without proper heat tools. I
once got a couple of soldered PLCC EEPROMS off a board. Those nasty
'J' pins are basically impossible to get off with solder wick. I
ended up taking a heat gun to the part and flicking it off while
locally reflowing the solder. PITA but worked great in the end (after
I found the cap that had come off at the same time).

> board). For example, this is the same part you'll find for the BIOS chip
> on a PC motherboard.

AFAIK socketed 32 pin PLCC packages were still common on motherboards
but I confess not having looked to close in the last while. Unlike
the 'good' old days screwing up your EEPROM with a firmware upgrade
is pretty rare so I haven't had the need in years.

>> On a different note. I think I asked this before but don't
>> remember it being answered unequivocally. Is that just a
>> standard PCMCIA wireless card that could be upgraded to
>> 802.11a or g?
>
> It's PCMCIA, not cardbus.

So it's the original 16 bit standard PCMCIA then. There are probably
no 16 bit 802.11a or g PCMCIA cards out there since IIRC 16 bit
topped out at around 20 Mbps and with 802.11a/g doing up to 54 Mbps+
there would be almost no market for 16 bit versions. :-(

Was it a big problem to make it a 32 bit/Cardbus slot? Actually thinking
about it, it is probably a bus support thing for your CPU since I
believe 16 bit PCMCIA was analogous to ISA and 32 bit PCMCIA (cardbus)
was analogous to PCI. Or it might be DMA or busmastering issues.

Of course, since real world performance of 802.11a would probably be
more like 20 Mbps it is a pity probably no one will make a 16 bit
PCMCIA version. It would be great for more robust streaming in
noisy home environments with lots of cordless phones and microwaves.
:-(

--
Daryle A. Tilroe

kdf
2004-04-05, 21:35
Quoting "Daryle A. Tilroe" <daryle (AT) micralyne (DOT) com>:

> > board). For example, this is the same part you'll find for the BIOS chip
> > on a PC motherboard.
>
> AFAIK socketed 32 pin PLCC packages were still common on motherboards
> but I confess not having looked to close in the last while. Unlike
> the 'good' old days screwing up your EEPROM with a firmware upgrade
> is pretty rare so I haven't had the need in years.

one item I know, Via uses the SST39VF040 for the EPIA mini-itx boards. PLCC32
socketed :)

-kdf