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Gus
2008-09-07, 18:53
I live in a place where unltd broadband isn't available - usage is typically limited and pretty expensive (relative to North America, Britain and France). As a result I've got a 2gig allowance from my ISP each month.

Can anyone give me an idea of how much of this allowance I'd burn an hour on a 128 or 192 kbps stream. While no doubt it's simple maths, I'm not really sure what the calculation is - and we're early in the month and I'd hate to get it wrong and use up all my allocation.

Thanks!

tomb
2008-09-07, 19:51
Let's see...

Stream rate (in kilobit/sec) is x - it uses x kilobits/sec
-> per minute, you get 60 * x kilobits
-> per hour, you get 60 * 60 * x kilobits, or
60 * 60 * x / 8 kilobytes

I presume your limit is 2 gigabytes (not bits), which is
2 * 1024 megabytes, which is
2 * 1024 * 1024 kilobytes, or 2,097,152 kilobytes.

Or in other words, number of hours of a stream with x kilobit/sec that fit into your limit:

2,097,152 / (60 * 60 * x / 8)


So, using a 128 kbit/sec stream (x = 128), you would use 57,600 kbytes per hour. Your 2GB limit would be used up in a little over 36 hours.

So, using a 192 kbit/sec stream (x = 192), you would use 86,400 kbytes per hour. The same 2GB limit would last you just about 24 hours.


This is not taking into account "fudge factors" such as metadata (stream name for example, SqueezeNetwork traffic), MP3 headers, or use of 1000 vs 1024 for "kilo" by your ISP, but those should not make a drastic overhead.

Limited broadband sucks :/

Gus
2008-09-08, 04:24
You say it so well. Limited broadband sucks.

I think I'll emigrate.

Thanks for the calculation.

ModelCitizen
2008-09-08, 04:30
You say it so well. Limited broadband sucks.
I think I'll emigrate.
Well don't bother coming to the UK, as capped bandwidth accounts and additional payment for extra bandwidth used are the norm here now (apart from resellers of the Enta offering.. who generally have to bear a congested service).

It's almost certain that they'll be the norm worldwide in the not-too-distant future. :-(

MC

bernt
2008-09-08, 04:51
Well don't bother coming to the UK, as capped bandwidth accounts and additional payment for extra bandwidth used are the norm here now (apart from resellers of the Enta offering.. who generally have to bear a congested service).

It's almost certain that they'll be the norm worldwide in the not-too-distant future. :-(

MC

R.I.P Internet.

MuckleEck
2008-09-08, 04:52
And even when you can get an unlimited package, there is always the "Fair Usage Policy" which is always undefined!

Goodsounds
2008-09-08, 09:11
Well don't bother coming to the UK, as capped bandwidth accounts and additional payment for extra bandwidth ......
It's almost certain that they'll be the norm worldwide in the not-too-distant future. :-(

MC

You may have heard that a large US cable provider, Comcast, announced that its residential users will soon be subject to a 250 GB monthly limit (I think that's the right number).

I don't personnally think this will stick in the US, I don't think people will accept it. In time as more people use more apps/services that require large download capacity, I don't believe the market will accept severe usage limits as discussed above. Or, if they stick, some company in a non-traditional modality (satellite, WiMax, something new, etc) will break the mold and open everything up again through competition in the market.

Gus
2008-09-08, 18:15
A shame to hear the UK's steadily intro'd bandwidth limits. I had unltd with a fair use policy when I was there. Fair use is no doubt unsettling as it can be arbitrary, but I'd actually prefer that approach more than the cut-and-dry (and expensive!) cap as it means you're not watching the clock every month. This assumes the ISP "gets" that if they're too petty about interpreting it they'll suffer a backlash.
As I say this, I realise that few ISPs seem to care about such things...but you can always hope.
In Australia I'm on an ASDL plan that offers 2gb for A$30 (US$25) a month. The highest allowance is 15gb for A$100, so you can see how out of bounds something like the 250gb limit would be, Goodsounds!

Goodsounds
2008-09-08, 19:49
The 250 GB cap is something like the top 1-2 % of users. Although I don't know what my home usage is, I just can't imagine what kind of "reasonable" personal usage could lead to numbers like that.

A capacity limit stikes me a just a band-aid for inadequate infrastructure investment. Japan and Korea are often cited around here as examples of places where ethernet-grade internet connections for households are widespread. I wonder if such services also do or do not have usage limits or tiered pricing models?

peejay
2008-09-08, 22:25
A shame to hear the UK's steadily intro'd bandwidth limits. I had unltd with a fair use policy when I was there. Fair use is no doubt unsettling as it can be arbitrary, but I'd actually prefer that approach more than the cut-and-dry (and expensive!) cap as it means you're not watching the clock every month. This assumes the ISP "gets" that if they're too petty about interpreting it they'll suffer a backlash.
As I say this, I realise that few ISPs seem to care about such things...but you can always hope.
In Australia I'm on an ASDL plan that offers 2gb for A$30 (US$25) a month. The highest allowance is 15gb for A$100, so you can see how out of bounds something like the 250gb limit would be, Goodsounds!

There are 200 Gbytes plans here in OZ, although one such plan is shaped so that peak/offpeak allowance is split to about 1/3 to 2/3 ratio. Peak is considered 9am - 4am the next morning, so you have a whopping 5 hours each day to use 2/3 of your allowance.....

I have a 50G plan (shaped 50/50) which suffices for me, and I stream internet radio @96/128 kbps for a few hours every other day, or thereabouts.

15G for AU$100 sounds a bit steep....are you in a regional or rural area not serviced by anything other than Tel$tra?

Wirrunna
2008-09-09, 20:09
I have a 50G plan (shaped 50/50) which suffices for me, and I stream internet radio @96/128 kbps for a few hours every other day, or thereabouts.

Which Internet radio ?
I'm just starting to investigate Internet radio and Squeezenetwork.
I'm on an AAPT 1500/256 15Gb plan (for $A50) and currently rarely use more than 2Gb