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MeSue
2008-09-04, 11:53
Now that I have a Boom, I would like to give my SB2 to hubby. There is an all-metal building on our property that he uses as a workshop where he would like to use it. However, I fear getting Ethernet out there is going to be a challenge. It's not finished in this picture, but you can get the idea of what I'm talking about: http://picasaweb.google.com/sue.chastain/RussSWorkshopBuilding#5079669562153442098

The building is about 20-30 paces from the back of the house, and probably twice that distance from where our router is situated. I'm wondering if powerline adapters would work for bringing Ethernet out there? Or is there a better solution?

andynormancx
2008-09-04, 12:06
Powerline should be fine.

MeSue
2008-09-04, 12:24
Powerline should be fine.

Even if it's on a different electrical circuit?

MuckleEck
2008-09-04, 12:36
Even if it's on a different electrical circuit?

MeSue I am using powerlines that are on a different circuit but the same initial circuit board they are connected through MCBs not fuses and I get a reasonable speed. Enough to use the Slingbox for video and the Squeezebox for music.

My only word of caution is don't buy cheap ones. I found that the Netgear 101s were the best after buying some cheap ones off of Amazon and sending them back.

Are the electrics out the the "uber" shed yet?...if not ask the electrician to put a flexible conduit in and run some ethernet in that.

andynormancx
2008-09-04, 12:49
I would personally recommend not going with the Netgears. Though I normally like Netgear's kit their 200M powerline adapters are a bad choice.

The first issue with them is that they don't interoperate with other 200M adapters. So you get tied into other Netgear adapters if you want to add to the network.

The second issue is that in my experience at least they don't cope well with noisy mains. I bought a set and they were completely hopeless or my admittedly very noisy mains. I had to replace them with Devolo's which work much much better than the Netgears on my mains. Which reminds me, must ebay the Netgears sometime...

MeSue
2008-09-04, 12:50
Yep, the electrical is already run to the workshop.

I have some old powerline adapters that we used long ago but haven't had a use for in a few years. It is the Netgear kit model WGXB102.

I would have just set it up and tried it, but I don't have any open ports on the router currently, so was wanting to learn if there was any hope before I go messing with stuff.

maggior
2008-09-04, 13:07
Even though the electrical is already run, perhaps now would be a good time to dig the trench up again and toss some conduit and CAT6 in there? Assuming it wasn't done long ago, you should see exactly where it was dug up and grass wouldn't have really estblished itself yet. This way, if he were to set up a PC in there for some reason, it would be easy to do with a hub/switch.

It's a bummer you guys didn't think of it before.

MeSue
2008-09-04, 13:25
It's not so much that we didn't think of it... but... it's complicated. For one thing, the router is is on the opposite side of the house from where the electric conduit had to be run. Also, the house has wood for the interior walls, ceiling, and floor plus wood siding on the outside, and hubby HATES to put holes in the wood for anything.

Oh, how I have longed for a house that was wired for Ethernet, but I'm stuck here for the foreseeable future, especially now that hubby has the "uber" shed. Don't get me wrong... I love all the wood in our country home, but it makes any kind of wiring a pain in the rear. Thank goodness for wireless!

JJZolx
2008-09-04, 17:24
The SB2 has the advantage of being able to replace the stock antenna. So I wonder if it would be possible to attach a directional antenna outside of the building run inside to the SB2 over coax. I've never done anything like this, so maybe someone else could comment on whether or not it's feasible.

Could this be done purely on the receiving end, pointing the antenna in the general direction of the house, or would it need directional antennas at both ends?

Can an antenna signal be run over coax for a distance of 20-30 feet or so?

MeSue
2008-09-04, 19:06
Hmm... that is something to think about if the powerline I already have doesn't work. I found this on Newegg that might fit the bill:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833164156

Our wireless router already has a high gain antenna, so hopefully it would only be needed on one end. I would certainly like to hear more thoughts on this.

bobkoure
2008-09-04, 19:53
well, if powerline doesn't do it for you, maybe get a linksys WRT54GL, install tomato on it, and put it into "remote access point" mode. Run cat5 from linksys to squeezebox. Put the antennas in a shed window and you should be good to go. (note - this is with the linksys in the shed)

Alternately, you could put the linksys into "repeater" mode and put it close to that side of the house. The tomato firmware lets you control which antenna does what so you can put a directional on one and point that at the shed. (so this is with the linksys in the house.)


Bob

MeSue
2008-09-04, 20:01
Bob: The "window" part of your suggestion is a problem. ;-)

I do have Tomato on my Buffalo router, though.... it is great.

chrisla
2008-09-04, 20:21
I've got one in a pelican case, with a 9dbi yagi inside the case, and
a 7dbi outdoor omni up on my chimney. It was about a weekend project
to put it together.

-Chris


On Thu, Sep 4, 2008 at 8:01 PM, MeSue
<MeSue.3f8uyb1220583901 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com> wrote:
>
> Bob: The "window" part of your suggestion is a problem. ;-)
>
> I do have Tomato on my Buffalo router, though.... it is great.
>
>
> --
> MeSue
>
> Sue
> http://www.last.fm/user/MeSue
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> MeSue's Profile: http://forums.slimdevices.com/member.php?userid=985
> View this thread: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=51991
>
>

iPhone
2008-09-04, 20:28
Hmm... that is something to think about if the powerline I already have doesn't work. I found this on Newegg that might fit the bill:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833164156

Our wireless router already has a high gain antenna, so hopefully it would only be needed on one end. I would certainly like to hear more thoughts on this.

I would go with a Parabolic antenna such as:
http://www.wifi-link.com/product.php?action=product&class1_id=1&class2_id=3&class3_id=158&product_id=1215
It is a whole lot cheaper and has 1 more dB of gain. It is also easier to line up a parabolic for beginners over flat panels due to the built in structure pointer. You would only need the Parabolic on one end. The Parabolic can also be installed in either the horizontal or vertical plane to best match your router.

Depending on what type of high gain antenna your wireless router has IE its radiation pattern and take-off angle due to gain, you might actually be better off going back to a standard antenna. In most vertical antennas, as the gain figure increases so does the take off angle. I like using the parabolic antennas with the new routers that have three antennas.

maggior
2008-09-04, 20:38
Hmm... that is something to think about if the powerline I already have doesn't work. I found this on Newegg that might fit the bill:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833164156

Our wireless router already has a high gain antenna, so hopefully it would only be needed on one end. I would certainly like to hear more thoughts on this.

I had an indoor Hawking antenna for one of my PCs before I figured out how to run a network cable from my top floor to the basement. It worked quite well and was well made. Hawking makes good stuff.

MeSue
2008-09-04, 20:39
I would go with a Parabolic antenna such as:
http://www.wifi-link.com/product.php?action=product&class1_id=1&class2_id=3&class3_id=158&product_id=1215
It is a whole lot cheaper and has 1 more dB of gain.

Thanks! I know he will like the price of that one compared to the Hawking. He's out of town this weekend, but I'm saving all the info for him and hopefully we can experiment when he gets back.

MeSue
2008-09-13, 13:02
Hi folks. I thought I would report back our results after trying the Netgear powerline equipment we already had. It works, but it wasn't without some struggles.

The kit I had came with 1 ethernet bridge (wired to router) and 1 wireless range extender. At some point I had bought another Ethernet bridge.

Originally we planned to use the wireless range extender out in the shed so he could use his laptop out there, but upon plugging it in we discovered it was completely dead (power light didn't come on).

So plan b was to use the other Ethernet bridge on the shed side. That worked in our initial test just plugging the house one into the most convenient place for a test. But that was with an Ethernet cable running across the room, so we had to rearrange the way some things were plugged in for permanent placement.

Then, when we had it plugged in where we thought would be best, he kept getting rebuffering on the Squeezebox. ARG. Next hubby went to every receptacle on that circuit, testing and replacing them. No good... still rebuffering. So then we rearranged some more plugs in the room so we could try it on yet another outlet. And that one works!

But we had to unhook the network printer for the test since all the ports on my router are filled. So for that, we dug out an old Netgear hub that we still had hanging around and put the printer and powerline bridge on that. Everything still works with the hub... whew!

So now he is happily listening to my old Squeezebox 2 in his shop with his old gigantic speakers that I made him remove from the living room entertainment center and the old receiver that he bought in 1987 and would not let me get rid of. :-) And we did not have to buy anything.

ModelCitizen
2008-09-13, 13:14
And we did not have to buy anything.
That's very good indeed.

We must buy/consume less.

MC