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MartinP
2008-08-25, 18:18
My Squeezebox classic was one of the innocent victims when lightning struck my house earlier this summer. The stereo amp and TV were fried too, though the Uninterruptible Power Supply they were connected to was unaffected! The Squeezebox seems completely dead. I've checked that its power supply still works. Can anyone recommend other simple tests I can perform to see if there's any life still in it?

iPhone
2008-08-25, 21:10
My Squeezebox classic was one of the innocent victims when lightning struck my house earlier this summer. The stereo amp and TV were fried too, though the Uninterruptible Power Supply they were connected to was unaffected! The Squeezebox seems completely dead. I've checked that its power supply still works. Can anyone recommend other simple tests I can perform to see if there's any life still in it?

How did you test the power supply? The internal switcher or the display could have been killed by the strike.

Most non-commercial UPSs do not make a good lightning protector or surge suppressor. A non-commercial UPS should be plugged into a Brick Wall to protect all equipment after it to include the UPS. Do not Google Brick Wall protectors to find "the cheapest one" as there is a company making bogus units. Go to brickwall.com and make sure if you buy one it is made by Price Wheeler Corporation.

Mnyb
2008-08-25, 22:07
Many UPS units are also default configured in so called bypass mode.
To save energy and battery life.

How to explain that with my English ? ok what you want an UPS to do in many cases is to run the incoming AC to the rectifier trough the battery stack and then make new AC with output inverter all the time, even when there is AC at normal levels present at the input.
To ease the life of the batteries and inverter many UPS bypass input to output and keep the output inverter idling, and then in case of power loss switch over to to output inverter really fast usually with static switches this works realy good in modern UPS but the obvious drawback is no surgeprotection.

A word about MOV based surge arrestors (the most common kind) my experience is that you can easily see when they worked :-) they usually exploded, if the surge is big enough, I have changed a lot protective circuits in the products I work with, after lightning storms.

iPhone
2008-08-26, 07:57
Many UPS units are also default configured in so called bypass mode.
To save energy and battery life.

How to explain that with my English ? ok what you want an UPS to do in many cases is to run the incoming AC to the rectifier trough the battery stack and then make new AC with output inverter all the time, even when there is AC at normal levels present at the input.
To ease the life of the batteries and inverter many UPS bypass input to output and keep the output inverter idling, and then in case of power loss switch over to to output inverter really fast usually with static switches this works realy good in modern UPS but the obvious drawback is no surgeprotection.

A word about MOV based surge arrestors (the most common kind) my experience is that you can easily see when they worked :-) they usually exploded, if the surge is big enough, I have changed a lot protective circuits in the products I work with, after lightning storms.

Changing the setting of how a UPS treats incoming AC in no way creates a surge protector or lightening protection. What it does do is make it more likely the surge or lightening also takes out the UPS, which might save your equipment because the strike or surge energy was small enough to be dissipated during the frying of the UPS. Any excess energy is still going to travel onto your equipment though. If you’re lucky, it is not large enough to kill your equipment.

Any surge or lightening protectors that have MOVs are not protecting anything for long or from large strikes and surges. A few small surges will be kept from your equipment, but after that one is wide open. MOVs either blow-up or are damaged to were they can no longer do their job after a few surges. But they do not give any indication that one is no longer protected because the outlet still provides AC power even though the surge circuit no longer exists.

Any surge or lightening protector that uses surge diversion to ground should also be avoided. Yes lightening is looking for the shortest path to ground and one would think that providing a quick path to ground would be logical. The problem is your equipment is also on this same ground.

The two surest ways to protect your equipment from lightening and surges is by not using the neutral or ground wire in your household wiring (RGPC 220 Sub-Station and Powerhouse use only the hot phases for isolation to produce 110VAC, no path to ground for lightening) or using a Series Mode surge unit (no MOVs, no sacrificial components, no diversion to ground) such as a Brick Wall Surge Protecting Line Filter.

gharris999
2008-08-26, 08:11
My Squeezebox classic was one of the innocent victims when lightning struck my house earlier this summer. The stereo amp and TV were fried too, though the Uninterruptible Power Supply they were connected to was unaffected! The Squeezebox seems completely dead. I've checked that its power supply still works. Can anyone recommend other simple tests I can perform to see if there's any life still in it?
Try opening the case and removing the wireless card and then see if it will power up. That's about the only swappable component. You'll need a torx tool to open the case.

MartinP
2008-08-28, 13:36
Thanks for the information about UPS. Lots to learn here, albeit a bit late. I've concluded that when there is a direct strike there's not much one can do to protect equipment. Perhaps the Brickwall products will prevent damage in such a situation. I'm now unsure whether the cheap UPS that I bought was unable to protect Squeezebox and the other components, or whether the lightning fried them directly without going through the power line. The test the UPS manufacture asked me to do was to see if the USB would provide power to a load when disconnected from the wall supply. It did. Presumably this shows that the battery and inverter are working, but is it a fair test? It seems from the posts in this thread that a UPS may have been damaged while trying to prevent a surge, yet still pass this test.

I tested the power supply with a voltmeter, and I also swapped it with a 'high quality' supply I made last year. The walwart delivered volts; the Squeezebox continued to show no signs of life with the alternative supply. I should add that I also checked to see if Squeezecenter could detect the player, and it couldn't.

I will remove the wireless card and see what difference that makes, if any. Can someone tell me what size Torx screwdriver I'll need? And does anyone want to buy a flawless Slimserver Squeezebox Classic case? :(

raaurora
2008-08-28, 16:15
My Squeezebox classic was one of the innocent victims when lightning struck my house earlier this summer. The stereo amp and TV were fried too, though the Uninterruptible Power Supply they were connected to was unaffected! The Squeezebox seems completely dead. I've checked that its power supply still works. Can anyone recommend other simple tests I can perform to see if there's any life still in it?

If you have (or now, have to replace) a lot of electronics, I would seriously consider having an electrician come in and put a full house surge protector where the electric company feed meets your circuit box. If your house gets hit by lightening, the protector will fry but will prevent the surge from coming into the home (so it would need to be replaced at that point).