PDA

View Full Version : Wired or wireless



Al Jones
2008-08-25, 03:04
I've had my Transporter for nearly a year and have so far had no option but to go wireless. I have never experienced a single drop-out playing FLAC files from my ReadyNAS. Signal strength is 80-85%.

I will soon be installing wired Ethernet in my living room, because my cable TV provider is switching to a set-top box that requires an always-on Internet connection to fight piracy.

Instead of having a single socket put in, I could just as easily have a double socket installed.

Given that my wirelss is "perfect," is there any reason to consider wiring my Transporter?

Al Jones

Dingostrategy
2008-08-25, 03:19
No.

(note, I use SB but even a basic wireless system is as 'fat' as ethernet and will make no difference to your quality, regardless of the components. However, if you won't otherwise use the wifi for computers, then its just a waste of power, I guess.)

Dingo
India.

morris_minor
2008-08-25, 04:11
I think the consensus round here is to use ethernet if you have the choice since it is **generally** more reliable than wireless. That said, if your wireless connection has been rock solid . . .

But if an extra ethernet socket is a low- (or no-) cost option then you will have the choice of which to use. And you can always use the wi-fi for a SB controller :O)

Dingostrategy
2008-08-25, 04:18
Sorry for slight off topic:

Mr. Minor may I ask a dumb question?

What's SBR - just when I thought I knew all the acronyms...

James Van Vleet
2008-08-25, 06:05
Assuming the cost is not too high for the second jack I would go to wired Ethernet. It is true that the audio quality will be no different if you are not getting any dropouts. But, while it is true that wireless bandwidth is plenty for these devices, it is important to know that is it shared bandwidth.

This means that if you have a 54mb "G" wireless router, everything using wireless shares that 54mb.

So in the future if you happen to start watching movies off your laptop or put in a new wireless device that needs lots of bandwidth, these things will compete with your wireless transporter.

Heck, a new cordless phone might change your wireless experience.

-James

toby10
2008-08-25, 06:20
I've had my Transporter for nearly a year and have so far had no option but to go wireless. I have never experienced a single drop-out playing FLAC files from my ReadyNAS. Signal strength is 80-85%.

I will soon be installing wired Ethernet in my living room, because my cable TV provider is switching to a set-top box that requires an always-on Internet connection to fight piracy.

Instead of having a single socket put in, I could just as easily have a double socket installed.

Given that my wirelss is "perfect," is there any reason to consider wiring my Transporter?

Al Jones

As has been suggested, if little or no cost, have the double socket put in for possible future use:
- maybe your WiFi will become troublesome some day (neighbor gets WiFi causing interference)
- more and more AV devices need ethernet for features & functions (like your new cable STB)

peter
2008-08-25, 06:26
toby10 wrote:
> Al Jones;332186 Wrote:
>
>> I've had my Transporter for nearly a year and have so far had no option
>> but to go wireless. I have never experienced a single drop-out playing
>> FLAC files from my ReadyNAS. Signal strength is 80-85%.
>>
>> I will soon be installing wired Ethernet in my living room, because my
>> cable TV provider is switching to a set-top box that requires an
>> always-on Internet connection to fight piracy.
>>
>> Instead of having a single socket put in, I could just as easily have a
>> double socket installed.
>>
>> Given that my wirelss is "perfect," is there any reason to consider
>> wiring my Transporter?
>>
>> Al Jones
>>
>
> As has been suggested, if little or no cost, have the double socket put
> in for possible future use:
> - maybe your WiFi will become troublesome some day (neighbor gets WiFi
> causing interference)
> - more and more AV devices need ethernet for features & functions
> (like your new cable STB)
>

I'd put in another double socket to future-proof things.... ;)

Regards,
Peter

morris_minor
2008-08-25, 06:33
Sorry for slight off topic:

Mr. Minor may I ask a dumb question?

What's SBR - just when I thought I knew all the acronyms...

SBR = Squeezebox Receiver, SBC = Squeezebox Controller

SBR+SBC = Squeezebox Duet.

I use my controller mostly with the SB3 in the living room [for the ultimate couch potato experience!] as wireless strength in my kitchen is marginal. But I keep a laptop almost permanently on the kitchen table, so control my receiver from that (the laptop's wireless reception is better than the controllers).

Bob

Dingostrategy
2008-08-25, 06:56
Thankyou. It's official, I am a noob.


SBR = Squeezebox Receiver, SBC = Squeezebox Controller

SBR+SBC = Squeezebox Duet.

I use my controller mostly with the SB3 in the living room [for the ultimate couch potato experience!] as wireless strength in my kitchen is marginal. But I keep a laptop almost permanently on the kitchen table, so control my receiver from that (the laptop's wireless reception is better than the controllers).

Bob

morris_minor
2008-08-25, 07:25
Thankyou. It's official, I am a noob.

Well, I've no idea what I did to earn my "Senior Member" status! Just got older and more grey I suppose . . .

B

[Oh - for completeness sake: SB3 is now called the "Squeezebox Classic" - which confusingly makes it another "SBC"; and of course TP = Transporter. SC = Squeezecenter, the new(ish) name for SlimServer (SS)]

SuperQ
2008-08-25, 08:10
I will soon be installing wired Ethernet in my living room, because my cable TV provider is switching to a set-top box that requires an always-on Internet connection to fight piracy.

Actually, you don't even need to wire the set top box, just plug it into the back of the transporter and use network bridging mode. This way the set top box will get full time access via your transporter's wifi. I did this a while back to stream video with no dropouts.

Pale Blue Ego
2008-08-25, 08:30
...because my cable TV provider is switching to a set-top box that requires an always-on Internet connection to fight piracy.

<RANT>
Excuse me, but WHAT A CROCK! What if you don't even own a PC - you have to buy a monthly net account just to watch TV? And what happens if you lose the net connection, the TV signal cuts off?

Does your cable company install the ethernet jack for free at the TV location, or is that another expense YOU have to incur? And I hope you realize they are using the net connection to track everything you watch...this data will be sold to advertisers. Neilsen used to pay people to voluntarily provide this data, now you're providing it against your will and at your own expense.

"to fight piracy" - that sounds very suspicious. Are VCRs illegal? I can pick up 10 or 12 HD channels over-the-air AND about 70 unencrypted cable channels with a hi-def tuner card. How are they fighting piracy if you can record the same programs for free with a $100 PC card? It's all about CONTROL, denying you LEGAL behavior through an imposed technical limitation.
</RANT>

pfarrell
2008-08-25, 09:08
Al Jones wrote:
> Given that my wirelss is "perfect," is there any reason to consider
> wiring my Transporter?

There is no reason not to do it. The cost of dragging two wires over one
is nothing. Do it.

You will be glad you did at some time.

When I pulled wire through my house (long after we moved in, walls up,
etc.) I pulled three CAT5 to my wife's office, three to my kids' bedroom
and six to my office. There are three in my living room, one for the
Transporter and two for general laptops.

And yes, I do have WiFI through the house.

--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

Al Jones
2008-08-25, 23:05
<RANT>
Excuse me, but WHAT A CROCK! What if you don't even own a PC - you have to buy a monthly net account just to watch TV? And what happens if you lose the net connection, the TV signal cuts off?

Does your cable company install the ethernet jack for free at the TV location, or is that another expense YOU have to incur? And I hope you realize they are using the net connection to track everything you watch...this data will be sold to advertisers.
</RANT>

My cable provider is also my Internet provider (a rock-solid 10 Mb connection that never tests at less than 9.6Mb even at peak times). If you want cable, but are not an Internet customer, they will supply a free modem and a carrier line that cannot be used for any other purpose. You pay for hookup.

Allegedly, the sole purpose of the Internet connection is to monitor that the cable subscription and Internet subscription belong to the same address, but, yes, there is obvious potential for abuse.

Al Jones

Al Jones
2008-08-25, 23:11
Actually, you don't even need to wire the set top box, just plug it into the back of the transporter and use network bridging mode. This way the set top box will get full time access via your transporter's wifi. I did this a while back to stream video with no dropouts.

I tried the wireless bridge. It works apparently, but every 15 minutes or so I get a warning message that fills the screen, informing me that I do NOT have an Internet connection. But my cable TV never shuts down.

Based on input here, I will get a double socket installed and use the second one for the Transporter until I need it for something else. Then I can always go wireless again for the Transporter.

Al Jones

Nonreality
2008-08-26, 01:56
<RANT>
Excuse me, but WHAT A CROCK! What if you don't even own a PC - you have to buy a monthly net account just to watch TV? And what happens if you lose the net connection, the TV signal cuts off?

Does your cable company install the ethernet jack for free at the TV location, or is that another expense YOU have to incur? And I hope you realize they are using the net connection to track everything you watch...this data will be sold to advertisers. Neilsen used to pay people to voluntarily provide this data, now you're providing it against your will and at your own expense.

"to fight piracy" - that sounds very suspicious. Are VCRs illegal? I can pick up 10 or 12 HD channels over-the-air AND about 70 unencrypted cable channels with a hi-def tuner card. How are they fighting piracy if you can record the same programs for free with a $100 PC card? It's all about CONTROL, denying you LEGAL behavior through an imposed technical limitation.
</RANT>

Exactly what I was thinking, I would change suppliers or refuse. What a bunch of bull.

Al Jones
2008-08-26, 03:32
Exactly what I was thinking, I would change suppliers or refuse. What a bunch of bull.

My provider has the fastest and most stable Internet and the right selection of TV channels for my tastes.

They do offer an STB that doesn't need Internet connection, but the one that does offers superior picture quality, video on demand and pay per view.

Down the line, they also promise up to 48 hour timeshifting for all channels, i.e. you can watch anything that started and finished within the last 48 hours.

For these reasons, I'm sticking (stuck?) with them.

Al J.

toby10
2008-08-26, 04:25
........Based on input here, I will get a double socket installed and use the second one for the Transporter until I need it for something else. Then I can always go wireless again for the Transporter.

Al Jones

Or just add a simple $20 wired hub down the road to the second socket to add more ethernet enabled AV gear. I have a solid WiFi signal from my network but I still avoid WiFi whenever physically possible (including all AV gear) just to avoid potential wireless problems. My $20 hub has made adding additional ethernet AV gear a breeze!

thing-fish
2008-08-26, 08:57
I'd put in another double socket to future-proof things.... ;)

LOL. In all seriousness, just use the single socket you already have, plug a switch into that, and plug however many other ethernet devices you want into your switch! I'm actually doing exactly that, not for hi-fi but because I have a jack that a networked printer is plugged into and am adding a Tivo to that room. Instead of going wireless with the Tivo I'm going to plug the Tivo and the printer into a switch, and the switch into the ethernet jack.

TiredLegs
2008-08-27, 10:37
LOL. In all seriousness, just use the single socket you already have, plug a switch into that, and plug however many other ethernet devices you want into your switch!
If I understand correctly, the OP does not already have any Ethernet socket. He's going to get either one or two installed. The incremental cost to get two is so insignificant that there's no reason not to.

TiredLegs
2008-08-27, 10:49
Al Jones wrote:
> Given that my wirelss is "perfect," is there any reason to consider
> wiring my Transporter?

There is no reason not to do it. The cost of dragging two wires over one
is nothing. Do it.

You will be glad you did at some time.

When I pulled wire through my house (long after we moved in, walls up,
etc.) I pulled three CAT5 to my wife's office, three to my kids' bedroom
and six to my office. There are three in my living room, one for the
Transporter and two for general laptops.

And yes, I do have WiFI through the house.

--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/
I'm with you Pat. A couple of years ago, I spent a few days pulling more than 1000 feet of Cat5e throughout my home, for two Ethernet cables to each room, including bedrooms, living room, kitchen, dining room, and den. One of the Cat5 cables pipes audio from my living room to my kitchen, via audio baluns. I've got three SB3's, and with wired connections I never have to worry about interference or bandwidth issues. I also have WiFi in the home, but I only use that for portable devices, such as a Nokia N800 internet tablet.

peter
2008-08-27, 10:58
thing-fish wrote:
> peter;332248 Wrote:
>
>> I'd put in another double socket to future-proof things.... ;)
>>
>
> LOL. In all seriousness, just use the single socket you already have,
> plug a switch into that, and plug however many other ethernet devices
> you want into your switch! I'm actually doing exactly that, not for
> hi-fi but because I have a jack that a networked printer is plugged
> into and am adding a Tivo to that room. Instead of going wireless with
> the Tivo I'm going to plug the Tivo and the printer into a switch, and
> the switch into the ethernet jack.
>

I'm serious. Not everything that goes over cat5 is ethernet. I send
audio&video from my server over it using a pair of baluns. You can't do
that over a switch. Who knows what else can be doen over cat5 now or in
the future?

Regards,
Peter

pfarrell
2008-08-27, 11:08
thing-fish wrote:
> LOL. In all seriousness, just use the single socket you already have,
> plug a switch into that,

There are limits to the number of switches in line of an Ethernet
connection. You can't just daisey chain switch into switch into switch
forever.

In my house, the broadband comes into a firewall/nat and then to a
switch, which talks to home runs of CAT5 to each location. So there is
already a switch between my Transporter and a router. One more is
allowed by the spec, but I think that's the limit.

Wire is nearly free, its the labor to pull it that costs big bucks.

I've pulled nearly 1600 linear feet of Cat5 cable in my house, and its
only a 2000 sqft center hall colonial.


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

peter
2008-08-27, 12:30
Pat Farrell wrote:
> thing-fish wrote:
>
>> LOL. In all seriousness, just use the single socket you already have,
>> plug a switch into that,
>>
>
> There are limits to the number of switches in line of an Ethernet
> connection. You can't just daisey chain switch into switch into switch
> forever.
>

Realistically, in a house setup, adding a peripheral switch in every
room, you'd end up with a maximum of 3. That shouldn't be any problem.
BTW, aren't you talking about hubs? If not, what is the maximum of
switches in 'line'?

> In my house, the broadband comes into a firewall/nat and then to a
> switch, which talks to home runs of CAT5 to each location. So there is
> already a switch between my Transporter and a router. One more is
> allowed by the spec, but I think that's the limit.
>
Really?

> Wire is nearly free, its the labor to pull it that costs big bucks.
>
> I've pulled nearly 1600 linear feet of Cat5 cable in my house, and its
> only a 2000 sqft center hall colonial.
>

I have thick concrete walls in a 4 story house. I'm extremely lucky they
already pulled cat5 for the phones so I can use that. Pulling new
connections is almost impossible. I've got an extra switch in my study.
Of course, my main gigabit switch is plugged into my home router which
has a 5 port switch built in already. So that's three in line for the
stuff in the study. No problems yet.

Regards,
Peter