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View Full Version : SqueezeBox recievers all i need?



nat
2008-08-24, 08:29
Hi there

I am seriously thinking about purchasing one of these squeezebox recievers, but cant seem to work out the difference between the duet, the classic, and the reciever.

now i already have squeezecenter running on my windows pc piping out music to my laptop over http.

am i right in assuming that all i then need to get, to allow me to play music in any room, is a squeezebox reciever, in any room i desire?
i am guessing that the duet/classic, are for people who dont have squeezecenter already running on a PC/Linux somewhere?

thanks

nat

iPhone
2008-08-24, 09:00
Hi there

I am seriously thinking about purchasing one of these squeezebox recievers, but cant seem to work out the difference between the duet, the classic, and the reciever.

now i already have squeezecenter running on my windows pc piping out music to my laptop over http.

am i right in assuming that all i then need to get, to allow me to play music in any room, is a squeezebox reciever, in any room i desire?
i am guessing that the duet/classic, are for people who dont have squeezecenter already running on a PC/Linux somewhere?

thanks

nat

Hello Nat and welcome to the Forum. From reading your post, I think that is a little confusion about the hardware. SqueezeCenter (SC) is just the Server Interface. To play music on a stereo system, powered speakers, boombox with AUX in, or other system, one needs SC running on a PC and either an SB Classic, Transporter, Duet, or Receiver. All of these devices have RCA outs for analog. The Transporter is a high end audiophile NMP. The Classic is a nice unit with an IR remote. Duet is actually a Squeezebox Receiver with a Squeezebox Controller (WiFi remote). The Receiver can be used alone (with some effort, better to just buy a Classic) but was meant to be used with a Duet to start then add multiple Receivers for additional rooms.

Does this help? Other or specific questions?

nat
2008-08-24, 10:06
hi iphone
thanks for your reply,

yes no doubt there is confusion, mostly originating at my end :)

ok i think i am getting it now
the duet has the whizzy wifi remote, but is just the same as the classic(IR remote) and a reciever (no remote)

so classic seems to be the first purchase i should make then.
but yes.. onto the confusion

my pc (that lives under the stairs, and also pumps out gbpvr to my Media MVP) has all my music on, and although not at the moment, has had (as it did when i put ubuntu onto it for a while) a squeezecenter server running on it, allowing me to point a browser on a pc (connected to my network) to pcUnderTheStairs:8080 (or 9090 cant remember) and play my music using the web front end. my question is, is the pc under the stairs an integral and in fact completely necessary part of using the squeezebox (be it classic , duet etc) as it has to host all the music and pump it out over the network ?

i at first thought that the duet , being alot more than the classic, may have had a hdd in it, with the music coming from there - which appears to be completley wrong.

thanks again

nat

toby10
2008-08-24, 11:06
hi iphone
thanks for your reply,

yes no doubt there is confusion, mostly originating at my end :)

ok i think i am getting it now
the duet has the whizzy wifi remote, but is just the same as the classic(IR remote) and a reciever (no remote)

so classic seems to be the first purchase i should make then.
but yes.. onto the confusion

my pc (that lives under the stairs, and also pumps out gbpvr to my Media MVP) has all my music on, and although not at the moment, has had (as it did when i put ubuntu onto it for a while) a squeezecenter server running on it, allowing me to point a browser on a pc (connected to my network) to pcUnderTheStairs:8080 (or 9090 cant remember) and play my music using the web front end. my question is, is the pc under the stairs an integral and in fact completely necessary part of using the squeezebox (be it classic , duet etc) as it has to host all the music and pump it out over the network ?

i at first thought that the duet , being alot more than the classic, may have had a hdd in it, with the music coming from there - which appears to be completley wrong.

thanks again

nat


No HDD on Duet. All SD products (SB3 Classic, SBR, SBC, Duet, Transporter) are networked based and require a computer or NAS to stream your stored music.
No computer or NAS and all you can do is stream Internet Radio via SqueezeNetwork.

iPhone
2008-08-24, 13:20
hi iphone
thanks for your reply,

yes no doubt there is confusion, mostly originating at my end :)

ok i think i am getting it now
the duet has the whizzy wifi remote, but is just the same as the classic(IR remote) and a reciever (no remote)

so classic seems to be the first purchase i should make then.
but yes.. onto the confusion

my pc (that lives under the stairs, and also pumps out gbpvr to my Media MVP) has all my music on, and although not at the moment, has had (as it did when i put ubuntu onto it for a while) a squeezecenter server running on it, allowing me to point a browser on a pc (connected to my network) to pcUnderTheStairs:8080 (or 9090 cant remember) and play my music using the web front end. my question is, is the pc under the stairs an integral and in fact completely necessary part of using the squeezebox (be it classic , duet etc) as it has to host all the music and pump it out over the network ?

i at first thought that the duet , being alot more than the classic, may have had a hdd in it, with the music coming from there - which appears to be completley wrong.

thanks again

nat

Hey Nat,
I think you might be better off visiting the Slim Devices website and looking at each one of the products. All of the Slim Devices require either a NAS or PC to act as a SqueezeCenter music server.

The Duet is actually to Slim Devices in one box. The Duet is a Squeezebox Receiver paired with a Squeezebox Controller. The Receiver is similar to a Classic but without a display or IR remote (it is what connects to your stereo just like a Classic). The Controller is a WiFi Remote Controller. It has a display and buttons like an IR remote but uses WiFi to talk and work with any current Slim Devices NMP. The reason the Duet costs more then a Classic is the Controller with its color screen.

If you think that you will be doing multiple rooms, it is best to start with the Duet and add Receivers as you add music to more rooms.

Pale Blue Ego
2008-08-24, 13:23
pcUnderTheStairs + Classic is probably what you want.

Dogberry2
2008-08-28, 15:54
Perhaps a simplified analogy will help make the different devices and conceptual relationships between them clear.

Picture the setup as a radio station and radio receiver. You need:

1. A radio station building to house the albums. This would be your PC, or a NAS/server, or whatever: some computer hardware with drive space to hold all the albums.
2. A disc jockey, to pick out the albums and play them. This would be the SqueezeCenter software running in the PC/NAS/server/whatever.
3. A broadcast antenna, to send the music out to the world. This would be your router.
4. A receiver, to pick up the signal being broadcast. This would be any of the SqueezeBox receiver devices: Transporter, SqueezeBox1/2/3, Duet receiver, whatever.
5. An amplifier and speakers, to amplify the signal the receiver picks up and make it heard.
6. A telephone, or way to communicate to the DJ what songs you want him to play.

#1 is up to you; it can be just about any kind of computer with some (plenty of) storage, as long as it is on a network and can run #2 (which means it has to be able to run Perl, which almost any standard operating system can -- Windows, Linux, Mac OS-X, whatever). Your PC under the stairs should be dandy.

#2 is the (free) SqueezeCenter software (written in Perl), which you can download from the SlimDevices site for free.

#3 is pretty much any kind of router, obviously has to be WiFi if you want wireless.

#4 is where the real decision has to be made, based on what you want and how you want to use it. The older SqueezeBox models (Transporter, 1/2/3) and the brand new Boom all have display screens and various buttons on them, to show you what is playing and help you find what to play, through a series of menus. All of the older models (Transporter, 1/2/3, Duet receiver) pretty much stop there.

#5 is again up to you: the receiver from #4 puts out a line-level signal, and you plug it in to whatever kind of amplifier/speaker arrangement you want. This can be a traditional stereo amplifier, and then to traditional speakers, or a set of "active" or "powered" speakers (which basically means the amplifier is built in with the speakers themselves). The exception to the SqueezeBox line is the just-announced SqueezeBox Boom, which in essence is a SqueezeBox 2 receiver combined with an amplifier and speakers all in one convenient box that's easy to pick up and move around.

#6 depends on which model SqueezeBox you get. Most of them (again, the Transporter, SB 1/2/3 and Boom) have buttons on the receiver itself for communicating to the SqueezeCenter software. (They also have a traditional-style infrared remote control that does the same thing; you point it at the receiver instead of getting up and walking over to it to press the buttons). That's where the Duet model differs: it has a "controller" device that is hand-held and looks something like a traditional remote, but is in fact a computer running Linux. With the Duet, the receiver doesn't have the control buttons on it (just a power on/off) and it doesn't have a screen to show you anything. The screen is on the controller, along with the buttons. When you work the controller, it talks to SqueezeCenter, which then plays your selected music and passes along various commands to the receivers. It's very handy for controlling multiple receivers from one place, or for keeping the display screen near you, so you can see what's playing and control things as you move around, even if you are not in the same room as the receiver(s).

This is just a quick analogy, a gloss of the big picture, but maybe it will help to see how the pieces work together. Your PC (or server) stores the music files; the SqueezeCenter software serves them out through the network via the router; the SqueezeBox receiver gets the music as it's streamed and feeds it to an amplifier, which then sends it to the speakers. Most of the setups you control via the receiver itself; the Duet is the exception, and is controlled via the hand-held controller.

Hope that helps to clarify the picture. I know it can be confusing at first.

Mark Lanctot
2008-09-10, 10:29
Excellent post, Dogberry2!

A minor correction so that no new users are confused: the SB1, SB2 and SB3 have no front panel controls. All control is through the infrared remote. Transporter and Boom have front panel controls in addition to an IR remote.

Also the Controller can control any SB player, not only the SB Receiver.