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chrisla
2008-08-07, 12:46
Every day I see posts about people saying the wireless on X logislim
device is unreliable or broken... I recently moved, and took all of my
wireless/computer/phone gear and setup the exact same stuff in a new
house. It all worked flawlessly in the old house. In the new house
it's really spotty. When the wireless phone rings, the microwave turns
on, or I look at it wrong... It cuts out.

Same gear, different placement and building materials, very different
results. If I had bought this gear at my current home, I may too be
ranting that it must be shoddy QA. It makes it really apparent to me
that engineering wireless gear, esp on unlicensed frequencies for an
unknown environment is tricky business indeed.


-Chris

SuperQ
2008-08-07, 13:54
Yup, the 2.4GHz band is a mess. I keep meaning to pick up a wi-spy 2.4x device so I can do site surveys.

tedfroop
2008-08-07, 14:02
Yes wireless is a bit of "Black Magic" at the moment but there are things you can do to help it.
-Construction Materials play a big part in reception strength. Steel studs, concrete, fireplaces, and brickwork are all poor materials for running a wireless network around. Steel reflects signals and confuses the heck out wireless. Dense stuff like concrete blocks the signal. Do a survey first - will it work where I am?
- A good UPS or power filter. The filtering of line noise can help a lot. I have a wireless system set up for my mother in law and there are 27 visible networks where it is but it works just fine.
-Get rid of any phones etc. in the 2.4 gig range, period. (and don't give the spread spectrum one to your neighbor - don't ask how I know.)
-Spring for a new microwave. They are not all that expensive any more and better shielding and less line noise helps .
-Place the AP or Router above the receivers if possible. The pattern of radiation from the antennas makes for better reception below than above.
-Get a better antenna for your AP. A coathanger is better than most stock antennas which are no more than a 3" piece of wire inside a molded piece of plastic. Flat panel antennas work great for poorer reception situations as they can be directed toward the client.


Always be prepared to wire your network. Wireless is a radio signal and under certain conditions it will not work properly.

toby10
2008-08-07, 14:39
Yes wireless is a bit of "Black Magic" at the moment but there are things you can do to help it.
-Construction Materials play a big part in reception strength. Steel studs, concrete, fireplaces, and brickwork are all poor materials for running a wireless network around. Steel reflects signals and confuses the heck out wireless. Dense stuff like concrete blocks the signal. Do a survey first - will it work where I am?
- A good UPS or power filter. The filtering of line noise can help a lot. I have a wireless system set up for my mother in law and there are 27 visible networks where it is but it works just fine.
-Get rid of any phones etc. in the 2.4 gig range, period. (and don't give the spread spectrum one to your neighbor - don't ask how I know.)
-Spring for a new microwave. They are not all that expensive any more and better shielding and less line noise helps .
-Place the AP or Router above the receivers if possible. The pattern of radiation from the antennas makes for better reception below than above.
-Get a better antenna for your AP. A coathanger is better than most stock antennas which are no more than a 3" piece of wire inside a molded piece of plastic. Flat panel antennas work great for poorer reception situations as they can be directed toward the client.


Always be prepared to wire your network. Wireless is a radio signal and under certain conditions it will not work properly.

And always change the routers default wifi channel. Changing mine from the mfr default ch 6 to ch 11 gave me an instant 20% signal boost. 30+% on some days. :)

chrisla
2008-08-07, 15:43
My nearest neighbor is 10,000 acres of redwood forrest, so the one
problem I'm pretty sure I am not having is bumping into someone else's
wifi :)

-Chris

>
> And always change the routers default wifi channel. Changing mine from
> the mfr default ch 6 to ch 11 gave me an instant 20% signal boost. 30+%
> on some days. :)
>
>
> --
> toby10
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> toby10's Profile: http://forums.slimdevices.com/member.php?userid=12553
> View this thread: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=50819
>
>

davep
2008-08-07, 16:21
Every day I see posts about people saying the wireless on X logislim
device is unreliable or broken... I recently moved, and took all of my
wireless/computer/phone gear and setup the exact same stuff in a new
house. It all worked flawlessly in the old house. In the new house
it's really spotty. When the wireless phone rings, the microwave turns
on, or I look at it wrong... It cuts out.




It's funny you should raise this because I just went through (am still going through) the same thing. Moved house from a place where wireless performance was just like it says on the tin - no deadspots, flawless SB usage in all the places where I wanted to put them, etc. The new place? A terrible slog through alternative placements, random dropouts, SBs refusing to see the network for days at a time, etc. I have now reached what seems to be an OK level of performance after about 6 weeks of on/off messing in odd hours in the evening and weekends. It is amazing how much time this can take up to work through a trial and error process of moving, connecting, testing, waiting, etc.

I finally ended up buying a wireless extender (from Linksys to match my router) and that entailed another whole round of looking for locations that were both functional and aesthetically acceptable to the other half. All in all a painful experience and one which might well have put me off of the whole idea of wireless streaming of music if I had not had such an easy time of it in the first house.

davep

tedfroop
2008-08-07, 20:02
Oh missed another couple causes - Bluetooth! Yet another intruder in the 2.3 GHz range and expanded metal lath. Post WW2 houses with hard plaster often have this hidden menace buried in the walls. It can act like the worst kind of trap/antenna/reflector you could imagine.

Has anyone had success with power line (http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=1&pid=533) networking and Squeezebox?

aubuti
2008-08-07, 21:45
Has anyone had success with power line (http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=1&pid=533) networking and Squeezebox?
Several people in the forums are using Homeplug technology. Just search the forums for various brands, success stories, problems, etc. http://forums.slimdevices.com/search.php?searchid=1715475

toby10
2008-08-08, 04:34
My nearest neighbor is 10,000 acres of redwood forrest, so the one
problem I'm pretty sure I am not having is bumping into someone else's
wifi :)

-Chris

>
> And always change the routers default wifi channel. Changing mine from
> the mfr default ch 6 to ch 11 gave me an instant 20% signal boost. 30+%
> on some days. :)
>
>
> --
> toby10
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> toby10's Profile: http://forums.slimdevices.com/member.php?userid=12553
> View this thread: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=50819
>
>

Yours is a good problem to have! But, for most, WiFi interference can be quite common. :) Far more common than microwave oven interference.

Nonreality
2008-08-08, 12:04
And always change the routers default wifi channel. Changing mine from the mfr default ch 6 to ch 11 gave me an instant 20% signal boost. 30+% on some days. :)
One caveat on switching channels from the default. Many of the type N routers will only use the N setting on certain channels. Be sure to check before you change it.