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View Full Version : How to Remove Scratches on SB3?



spinaltap
2008-07-08, 04:07
Only having owned my SB3 for a couple of weeks I've caused considerable surface scratching on the display unit (and having received it as a present, I'm quite upset by my actions).

Does anyone have any ideas for removing such surface scratches?

Two solutions on the web look promising - such as AppleSauce - http://www.applesaucepolish.com/homepages/support.html

Ice Creme - http://www.radtech.us/Products/IceCreme.aspx

..and Displex - http://www.hama.de/portal/articleId*16841/action*2563

However, I don't want to waste money on fruitless experimentation, so any ideas would be appreciated.

Alternatively, does anyone know if the top-half display acrylic can be replaced (as a spare part) and how would one go about replacing such a part?

drewe181
2008-07-08, 04:49
i believe toothpaste is a good polishing agent. perhaps it would work. and it's cheap!

spinaltap
2008-07-08, 04:50
No, I tried that - and it made the situation considerably worse!

maggior
2008-07-08, 09:15
I've read positive reviews of AppleSauce at www.newegg.com. Yes, toothpaste is much too harsh of an abrasive. I learned that when I tried it on a scratched CD.

mvalera
2008-07-08, 09:20
Meguiars plastic polish & cleaner.

The cleaner alone works on most scratches.

Mike

HectorHughMunro
2008-07-08, 15:03
Silver polish would be the finest. I used to use Brasso on my Ipod 4G Photo with some success.

mvalera
2008-07-08, 15:29
I would stick with something designed for plastic.

The Meguiars is cheaper than the applesauce stuff, and has been used for getting scratches out of automotive plastic parts (like convertible plastic rear windows... possibly the worst place to put plastic in history) for quite a bit longer.

JimC
2008-07-08, 20:55
Meguiars plastic polish & cleaner.

The cleaner alone works on most scratches.

Mike

I don't use Meguiar's, but automotive plastic polishes are your definitely easiest/best bet.

The alternative is using progressively milder rubbing compounds, finishing with the lightest grit to get it to the highest possible shine/clarity. It's a bit harder than the one step stuff, but it works a treat... I've been cleaning up screens on MP3 players, cell phones, and other portable devices using this method for the last several years. Much of the time, the lightest grit is all you need.


-=> Jim

damager
2008-07-08, 21:00
Only having owned my SB3 for a couple of weeks I've caused considerable surface scratching on the display unit (and having received it as a present, I'm quite upset by my actions).


My SB3 sits, untouched, on a shelf in my den. What specifically are you doing to your SB3 that is causing that kind of scratching?

pfarrell
2008-07-08, 21:05
JimC wrote:
> I don't use Meguiar's, but automotive plastic polishes are your
> definitely easiest/best bet.

I'd not call any of them "easy" but its doable. Just takes time and effort.

There is a difference in "grit" level with the names, Polish is
different than "Cleaner" but I forget which is which. Check the labels


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

spinaltap
2008-07-09, 01:44
My SB3 sits, untouched, on a shelf in my den. What specifically are you doing to your SB3 that is causing that kind of scratching?

Having recently purchased a Sony iPod Clock Radio, I discovered that it had an audio-in port. I had unplugged my SB3 in the living-room so that I could connect it to said audio-in port to check that it would work (the intention being to purchase a Duet receiver, controlled via iPod Touch/iPeng).

In moving the SB3 I caused surface scratching on the display panel. Having tried to eradicate the surface scratching has made it worse. Shame on me!

spinaltap
2008-07-10, 01:17
I just received a response from technical support on the cost of replacing the acrylic display cover on my Squeezebox Classic - a whopping $90 (45).

That's one-third of the price I paid for the whole device.

So, if anyone can provide a definitive recommendations for 'plastic polish' I would appreciate it, as I haven't decided on which product to go for.

funkstar
2008-07-10, 01:27
For reference, $90 is the flat fee for out of waranty repairs. So that could be for anything from a bad power connector to a new wirless card or VFD.

spinaltap
2008-07-10, 01:38
The impression is created that the plastic cover would be posted to me for me to replace, not for me to return the unit for someone else to repair.

On that basis $90 for a self-repair piece of plastic is unreasonable.

Mark Lanctot
2008-07-10, 11:52
A CD repair kit may work. The buffing compound included is very fine grit but you have to exert considerable force to get it to take out the "haze" caused by coarser grits, like the one in the toothpaste.

You take out deeper scratches by using the fine sandpaper included. Yes, fine sandpaper. Then you buff out the resulting haze.

See http://wiki.slimdevices.com/index.php/DiscRepair#CD_Repair_Kits

Martyn
2008-07-10, 12:37
The key is to use a buffing wheel with the appropriate buffing compound. You can try this yourself with a buffing wheel chucked in electric drill. Trying to remove anything but the finest scratches by hand is tedious and frustrating. For sources you could try woodworking suppliers (woodworkers hone and polish their hand tools), glass fibre suppliers, and probably lots of other places. If you'd rather have someone else do it, look for polishers in your Yellow Pages, or perhaps plastic sign fabricators or jewellers. What you're trying to do is easy if you know how, impossible if you don't!

bopyanker
2008-07-10, 13:05
You might try a lens scratch repair kit. The kind used for eyeglasses not CD players.

ModelCitizen
2008-07-10, 13:54
You might try a lens scratch repair kit. The kind used for eyeglasses not CD players.

I'd have been happier if the Logitech stuff (and most especially the Controller) had been made out of stuff that did not scratch so damn easily.

MC

amcluesent
2008-07-10, 14:18
>had been made out of stuff that did not scratch so damn easily<

Let's hope that's the only feature of Apple's kit that Slimdevices copy!

mvalera
2008-07-10, 14:59
The key is to use a buffing wheel with the appropriate buffing compound. You can try this yourself with a buffing wheel chucked in electric drill. Trying to remove anything but the finest scratches by hand is tedious and frustrating. For sources you could try woodworking suppliers (woodworkers hone and polish their hand tools), glass fibre suppliers, and probably lots of other places. If you'd rather have someone else do it, look for polishers in your Yellow Pages, or perhaps plastic sign fabricators or jewellers. What you're trying to do is easy if you know how, impossible if you don't!

Wow...

Do not use sandpaper.

Do not use a wheel or power tool of any kind.

If the meguair's, or other auto plastic polisher doesn't get the scratch out by hand, you will almost certainly make it worse then when you started by trying a different method.

So again, get the meguiar's plastic polish and cleaner, 2 or 3 fine microfiber cloths, and go to work.

If you are doing a Squeezebox Classic I highly recommend taking off the front plate and using gloves.

If you are working on a Controller, mask off anything you aren't polishing as the stuff always finds it way into cracks.

Mike

spinaltap
2008-07-11, 00:59
If you are doing a Squeezebox Classic I highly recommend taking off the front plate and using gloves.

What are the instructions for carefully removing the front plate?

Mark Lanctot
2008-07-11, 06:42
Do not use sandpaper.

Well, you represent the manufacturer which I don't, but the "sandpaper" used in CD repair kits is at least 1200 grit and is used wet. Yes, it does leave a haze which has to be buffed out using the buffing compound. No, it does not leave deep scratches.

Without the sandpaper, you simply can't get out the deeper scratches.

Now, this is on polycarbonate, not acrylic. However it is for optical playback and I can buff the haze out *almost* perfectly.

It's like ice maintenance - to get out the deeper scratches, you have to resurface.

mvalera
2008-07-11, 09:58
What are the instructions for carefully removing the front plate?

Get a Torx screwdriver to fit the 2 screws on the back. (can't remember what size... anyone?)

Unscrew the screws, front comes off the back.

Wear gloves so you don't get fingerprints on the inside.

BTW... all of this advise in this thread is to be done at your own risk.

Mike

mvalera
2008-07-11, 09:59
Well, you represent the manufacturer which I don't, but the "sandpaper" used in CD repair kits is at least 1200 grit and is used wet. Yes, it does leave a haze which has to be buffed out using the buffing compound. No, it does not leave deep scratches.

Without the sandpaper, you simply can't get out the deeper scratches.

Now, this is on polycarbonate, not acrylic. However it is for optical playback and I can buff the haze out *almost* perfectly.

It's like ice maintenance - to get out the deeper scratches, you have to resurface.

I should add: Do not use sandpaper... unless you really know what you are doing.

In which case you wouldn't be asking for help in getting scratches out. :)

Mike