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View Full Version : Investigating Lousy Internet Radio Connectivity



jonheal
2008-02-28, 07:05
I'm just starting to research this, so I want to get my facts straight.

Lately, it is becoming obvious that keeping a connection with an Internet radio station for more than a short period of time in our household is impossible. This is not a wireless issue -- I'm talking about a wired SB3 connecting to the Internet over a 5Mbps FiOS connection.

My first inclination was to blame it on flaky or overloaded servers at the broadcaster's end. But when normally very reliable broadcasters like Radio Paradise started dropping out on me, I began to suspect that something else was at play.

Then, a week or so ago, it became apparent that Verizon, my provider, was changing my IP address many times per day. (I've got a script running right now to see just how many times it changes a day.)

My assumption is that if Verizon changes my IP number while I'm listenting to an Interent radio station, I'll lose my connection to whatever station I'm listening to, correct?

jonheal
2008-02-28, 13:12
I'm just starting to research this, so I want to get my facts straight.

Lately, it is becoming obvious that keeping a connection with an Internet radio station for more than a short period of time in our household is impossible. This is not a wireless issue -- I'm talking about a wired SB3 connecting to the Internet over a 5Mbps FiOS connection.

My first inclination was to blame it on flaky or overloaded servers at the broadcaster's end. But when normally very reliable broadcasters like Radio Paradise started dropping out on me, I began to suspect that something else was at play.

Then, a week or so ago, it became apparent that Verizon, my provider, was changing my IP address many times per day. (I've got a script running right now to see just how many times it changes a day.)

My assumption is that if Verizon changes my IP number while I'm listenting to an Interent radio station, I'll lose my connection to whatever station I'm listening to, correct?

It may not have looked like it, but my last sentence was a question I was asking ... hoping for confirmation one way or another from more network-savvy people than myself.

snarlydwarf
2008-02-28, 14:17
Yes, it would break the stream.

A TCP stream is defined as a unique pair of IP:PORT, IP:PORT. If the IP changes, the stream goes away.

Why on earth they would change a dynamic IP so often is another matter: that is just plain nuts. Something sounds wrong with their setup or your router or modem if it is changing DHCP that often.

jonheal
2008-02-29, 09:57
Yes, it would break the stream.

A TCP stream is defined as a unique pair of IP:PORT, IP:PORT. If the IP changes, the stream goes away.

Why on earth they would change a dynamic IP so often is another matter: that is just plain nuts. Something sounds wrong with their setup or your router or modem if it is changing DHCP that often.

I looked in my router's log and there were numerous connection errors. It's a D-Link DI-604, one of the few "Verizon-approved" routers. In fact, Verizon has there own version of firmware for it.

Anyway, I download the latest version of the firmware from Verizon (which is still three years old, but a year newer than what was on it). I installed the firmware upgrade, and things seem to be more stable. My IP address hasn't changed in 20 hrs.