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bigfool1956
2008-02-18, 06:32
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7250068.stm

Blu-ray has the potential to give us higher-than-cd quality music, of course we would want to be able to get that off the disc and onto the hard drive....

Guess this thread is for non-US citizens only, as even making a post would be illegal, as I understand it...... Oh dear.

toby10
2008-02-18, 09:15
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7250068.stm

Blu-ray has the potential to give us higher-than-cd quality music, of course we would want to be able to get that off the disc and onto the hard drive....

Guess this thread is for non-US citizens only, as even making a post would be illegal, as I understand it...... Oh dear.

Yeah, HD-DVD is dead.

Just in the last two weeks Wal Mart & Netflix announced they are completely dropping HD-DVD content and players. Target saw the writing on the wall a year ago and stopped stocking HD-DVD players in their stores. Best Buy announced it will "officially recomend Blu-ray only". Other large retailers will follow. Toshiba is expected to announce (very soon) that they are ending HD-DVD player production and abandoning the format, though this could mean limited production players and content for another year or so. But Toshiba is abandoning the format as they are *bleeding* money on the format. Source material will still be available for a while, but there will be little (if any) new materials released on HD-DVD a year from now. If / when Toshiba officially abandons the format that should release the few remaining studios from their contractural agreements with Toshiba & HD-DVD.

Please note, I am NOT a Blu-ray owner nor fan, I'm just relaying what is widely known and discussed in HTR forums and articles as this is my hobby. :)

Honva
2008-02-18, 09:56
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7250068.stm

Blu-ray has the potential to give us higher-than-cd quality music, of course we would want to be able to get that off the disc and onto the hard drive....

Guess this thread is for non-US citizens only, as even making a post would be illegal, as I understand it...... Oh dear.

Saw a similar RSS feed last night from Reuters. It is good for Toshiba to make the announcement before their last partner Paramount makes the switch.

It is good for all of us with only one format. Blue-ray sales should go up fast and price should start to drop to the $150-$200 level soon. However, for most people, the main cost of the switch is not buying the player, but to upgrade the Receiver.

I was surprised last year not seeing music industry using the HD format. Hope this will encourage them more. 96/24 in 7.1 channel sounds very attractive, especially in concert recordings.

Biu

exile
2008-02-18, 10:01
I'd add that even blu-ray technology appears to be somewhat irrelevant. As a user of a digital music server I can only imagine a future where we have digital video media centers just like a slimserver. movies and tv shows may live on hard drives (or on an accessible online server) and we use a squeezebox like interface (or apple tv) to access whatever we want to watch. The notion of using video discs seems already to be an old school way of watching video programs. I use my dvd player as frequently as my cd player-almost never.

bigfool1956
2008-02-18, 10:14
I'm not about to change my main listening environment to more than 2 channels any time soon, even rhough I love multi-channel for film etc.

This isn't really because I'm a Luddite, but because I cannot see how I can physically achieve it in my room, and get the same quality, plus the cost would be prohibitive.

However, if I could get music in 24/96 (nice) untainted by the loudness wars (vital), and if I could then get that on a hard disc to feed my TP, then I think I would probably become a resonably good blu-ray consumer.

On the other hand, Dolby TrueHD is pretty much an extension of DVDA - it still uses MLP for example. I believe this is a packeted format, and as such should be able to be read much more successfully off the disc, than redbook CD. LPCM can be output through the digital outs of a player..........

So I'm thinking PS3 -> Transporter, which of course already works, but if we got a lot more choice of discs, it could be cool.

Ah but, now we are back to discs for playing, instead as a transport medium for the data. So we are back to ripping, and talking about that on a US hosted web site could be illegal - so I won't. Sigh.

Guess it's back to hoping for legal hi-res download opportunities.

pfarrell
2008-02-18, 10:21
exile wrote:
> The notion of using video discs seems already to be an
> old school way of watching video programs. I use my dvd player as
> frequently as my cd player-almost never.

I agree, this was a silly war that no one will care about in a year or
two. And if the US had broadband like Korea, we would not care now.

Delivering authored content via small flat plastic disks is so last century


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

toby10
2008-02-18, 10:28
.....It is good for all of us with only one format. Blue-ray sales should go up fast and price should start to drop to the $150-$200 level soon. However, for most people, the main cost of the switch is not buying the player, but to upgrade the Receiver.........

Yes, in the long run, good for all. There are probably millions worldwide (potentially 10's of millions) who (like me) will eventually go Blu-ray in the next couple of years now that there is a clear format to buy.

As for the AVR there are three different ways to achieve lossless HD audio from an HD/BD player and, depending on your AVR, may not require an new AVR.

1. player decodes audio and sends to AVR via 5.1 or 7.1 analog
(requires player and AVR have discrete analog out's/in's respectively)
2. player decodes audio and sends to AVR as PCM (MPCM) via HDMI
(requires AVR with HDMI 1.1 audio input)
3. player sends raw audio (bitstream) to AVR via HDMI, AVR decodes audio
(requires AVR with HDMI 1.3 and onboard HD audio codecs)

peter
2008-02-18, 10:50
bigfool1956 wrote:
> I'm not about to change my main listening environment to more than 2
> channels any time soon, even rhough I love multi-channel for film etc.
>
> This isn't really because I'm a Luddite, but because I cannot see how I
> can physically achieve it in my room, and get the same quality, plus the
> cost would be prohibitive.
>

Not to mention the WAF of a room full of speakers. I don't like it much
either myself. Two ears, two speakers ;)

Regards,
Peter

peter
2008-02-18, 10:51
Pat Farrell wrote:
> exile wrote:
>
>> The notion of using video discs seems already to be an
>> old school way of watching video programs. I use my dvd player as
>> frequently as my cd player-almost never.
>>
>
> I agree, this was a silly war that no one will care about in a year or
> two. And if the US had broadband like Korea, we would not care now.
>
> Delivering authored content via small flat plastic disks is so last century
>

Amen brother.
The only DVD drives in my house are in laptops.

Regards,
Peter

schatzy
2008-02-18, 11:32
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7250068.stm


Guess this thread is for non-US citizens only, as even making a post would be illegal, as I understand it...... Oh dear.

It was announced on NPR in the US this morning.

Also on USA Today http://www.usatoday.com/money/media/2008-02-17-toshiba-hddvd_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Schatzy

toby10
2008-02-18, 11:57
It was announced on NPR in the US this morning.

Also on USA Today http://www.usatoday.com/money/media/2008-02-17-toshiba-hddvd_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Schatzy

USA Today (not surprisingly) is a little behind on reporting the "rumours & speculations" of Toshiba abandoning the HD-DVD format as other media sources have been reporting this since last week. I don't doubt the validity of the speculation at all and I'd bet the official announcement from Toshiba would be this week or next.

Toshiba source to Reuters News: "We have entered the final stage of planning to make our exit from the next generation DVD business."

http://gizmodo.com/357311/its-official-toshiba-pulling-the-plug-on-hd-dvd

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/news/e3ib77125d96b22e86027d0bfb0c25aa58d

Honva
2008-02-18, 12:49
Looks like Paramount Pictures missed the opportunity. As the last film producer in HD DVD group, Paramount could have use the opportunity to strike a good deal with the Blu-ray group to end the war. Now that toshiba made their move first, Paamount no longer has this advantage.

Pale Blue Ego
2008-02-18, 18:48
I don't think movies on disc is such a bad thing. Do we really want to rip 50 GB to our hard drives for a movie we may watch only once or twice? I don't.

Anyway, it's good to see this format war coming to an end. We should see reasonably-priced players soon.

pfarrell
2008-02-18, 19:01
Pale Blue Ego wrote:
> I don't think movies on disc is such a bad thing. Do we really want to
> rip 50 GB to our hard drives for a movie we may watch only once or
> twice? I don't.

No, its not that you will rip them at all.
They will be delivered over the 'net.
Physical plastic disks are dead. As are players for them.


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

toby10
2008-02-19, 05:54
As expected, HD-DVD is officially dead!
Official Toshiba press release Feb 19, 2008:
http://www.toshiba.co.jp/about/press/2008_02/pr1903.htm

Viewing hours will be now through March 08.

cparker
2008-02-19, 06:51
No, its not that you will rip them at all.
They will be delivered over the 'net.
Physical plastic disks are dead. As are players for them.


Very unlikely.. physical media is here to stay.

The convenience of the plastic disc is far higher than the gauntlet of bandwith limits, crashing hard disks, file corruption and DRM.

How exactly would you take your movie collection on holiday, in the car, in a plane etc. Yes you could download first for new content but then you have to plan ahead (and ensure it can play offline) and for your existing content you have to find the time to rip them.

At least with a disc in your hand you know its going to play!

pfarrell
2008-02-19, 07:01
cparker wrote:
> Pat Farrell;270836 Wrote:
>> They will be delivered over the 'net.
>> Physical plastic disks are dead. As are players for them.
>
> Very unlikely.. physical media is here to stay.
>
> The convenience of the plastic disc is far higher than the gauntlet of
> bandwith limits, crashing hard disks, file corruption and DRM.

This is exactly what was said about music CDs in 1999 or so.
All of us SqueezeBox users know that physical music disks are irrelevant.


> How exactly would you take your movie collection on holiday, in the
> car, in a plane etc. Yes you could download first for new content but
> then you have to plan ahead (and ensure it can play offline) and for
> your existing content you have to find the time to rip them.

To make this happen, all we need is to move from the equivalent of
dialup, which most folks had in 1999, to the equivalent of broadband.
The reason so many folks used low rate MP3 was that relative to dialup,
it was faster. With modern broadband (even as dead slow as it is in the
US) you can do real time RedBook.

The idea of online and offline is going to die. You want a movie or TV
show, you watch it from some server somewhere.

I have no idea how it will be billed. Perhaps like HBO, where $20 a
month buys all of their movies for a month.

I'm not claiming that plastic disks will go away by the end of this
week. But by the end of the next decade, for sure.



--
-- toc
toc (AT) curmudgeon4 (DOT) us
http://www.curmudgeon4.us/

4mula1
2008-02-19, 07:26
cparker wrote:
> Pat Farrell;270836 Wrote:
>> They will be delivered over the 'net.
>> Physical plastic disks are dead. As are players for them.
>
> Very unlikely.. physical media is here to stay.
>
> The convenience of the plastic disc is far higher than the gauntlet of
> bandwith limits, crashing hard disks, file corruption and DRM.

This is exactly what was said about music CDs in 1999 or so.
All of us SqueezeBox users know that physical music disks are irrelevant.


> How exactly would you take your movie collection on holiday, in the
> car, in a plane etc. Yes you could download first for new content but
> then you have to plan ahead (and ensure it can play offline) and for
> your existing content you have to find the time to rip them.

To make this happen, all we need is to move from the equivalent of
dialup, which most folks had in 1999, to the equivalent of broadband.
The reason so many folks used low rate MP3 was that relative to dialup,
it was faster. With modern broadband (even as dead slow as it is in the
US) you can do real time RedBook.

The idea of online and offline is going to die. You want a movie or TV
show, you watch it from some server somewhere.

I have no idea how it will be billed. Perhaps like HBO, where $20 a
month buys all of their movies for a month.

I'm not claiming that plastic disks will go away by the end of this
week. But by the end of the next decade, for sure.

The problem I see (maybe have is a more suitable word) is that all of the mainstream online music retailers sell lossy music. I know that with my physical media and a lossless encoder I have on my digital audio player a 100% identical copy to what's on my physical media. The industry triumph right now is just getting DRM to be relaxed/dropped.

Don't forget the uproar over companies like AT&T (SBC) wanting to charge content providers like Google for "pushing" their content over the network. Now we are facing bandwidth throttling on P2P activity, but what's to say they won't extend it to media content that they aren't the source of? IIRC there was mention of a QOS fee to make sure such content is delivered reliably. This makes me think of the cellco "walled garden" approach where the only content you get comes from them. An extreme example, but you get the general idea.

Until I can buy lossless, DRM free music from mainstream outlets and not worry about my ISP or their connection choking my content because they think I need to pay them more for the privelige I will continue to buy physical media.

The masses, however, think that mp3 is the be all and end all of digital formats, are probably totally unaware anything else (and better) exists and will embrace the concept of 100% digital distribution quite readily. I think I'm just getting old and set in my ways.

cparker
2008-02-19, 07:50
This is exactly what was said about music CDs in 1999 or so.
All of us SqueezeBox users know that physical music disks are irrelevant.

Well its almost 2009 (well shortly) and how many people do you know that have offloaded all their CDs and are fully online only? Even for SqueezeBods we have CDs as a security/backup for when our libraries die.



I'm not claiming that plastic disks will go away by the end of this week. But by the end of the next decade, for sure.


That would involve some huge investment in infrastructure, certainly no ISP is going to be able to afford that by selling 25 a month broadband packages.

I agree on the movie front, but then only because 99% of movies are designed to be viewed once and thrown away, whereas with music its more tactile, well for me anyway. I always buy the disc and then rip, not the other way around, but then maybe I'm getting old :S

exile
2008-02-19, 08:28
Personally, I think that the need to have a physical media disk will quickly give way to the convenience of server driven media content. I too like having lossless quality music files. The majority of my music collection is in flac format because I had the actual cd's to rip. But now that we live in the age of itunes and amazon downloads it makes no sense to me to go out and purchase physical cd's.

Pale Blue Ego
2008-02-19, 10:05
The real tragedy is that U.S. citizens have already paid for high-speed (45 mbps) connections. The Telecommunications Act of 1996 gave the telecom companies hundreds of billions in tax breaks and incentives in exchange for the promise of high-speed broadband to all citizens within 10 years. It was also supposed to foster competition and bring in a new age of cheap, fast services. Instead, we got "broadband" speeds at a fraction of 1 mbps for $50 a month, and instead of competition, we got almost total consolidation.

It's no wonder mp3 is still so pervasive. Broadband speeds have been stagnant for years. I had one of the first cable modems in the country in 1996, and it was quicker that what I'm getting today.

dSw
2008-02-19, 14:13
This is exactly what was said about music CDs in 1999 or so.
All of us SqueezeBox users know that physical music disks are irrelevant.

Hardly. I use the SB in my house but I buy music almost entirely in CD format and the CDs are regularly used in the car. They're also the most convenient way to loan music to friends. The number of CD players in the world will ensure the the CDs survival for a while yet.. plus there's the huge investment in technologies such as Blue-Ray.

exile
2008-02-19, 14:38
They're also the most convenient way to loan music to friends.

I have to respectfully disagree. I exchange music with friends quite a bit and it's all done through portable drives.

I think the physical disk is indeed almost dead.

Phil Leigh
2008-02-19, 14:49
I have to respectfully disagree. I exchange music with friends quite a bit and it's all done through portable drives.

I think the physical disk is indeed almost dead.

Sorry - that's wishful thinking. Don't extrapolate what you and your friends do to the other 6Bn people on the planet!

exile
2008-02-19, 14:58
I didn't mean tomorrow.

I'm convinced though that physical media platforms like the cd or dvd are a dinosaur medium that will rather quickly (within the next decade) go the way of the record album- they will feed a niche market and not the masses.

Zten
2008-02-19, 15:55
But a large portion of your life will go by before then. The way this stuff works is once it reaches a price point you are comfortable with, JUMP IN -- NO REGRETS. Don't look back for a few years becuase it will just be a painful experince. First you see your equivalent equipment drop in price, then you see BETTER stuff at the same price you paid, then you see better stuff at LOWER prices, and it accelerates down from there....

I got a Blue Ray player and a 52" LCD flat panel last month. 1080p with uncompressed 5.1 audio is AWESOME. It felt like the day I got my first CD player. BTW, the day I got my first CD player had larger immediate impact than the day I got my Squeezebox. Don't get me wrong. I love my SB, but it was a small step for Man. The CD player was a giant leap for Mankind.

You guys can wait for 1080p and uncompressed 5.1 audio to stream to your home. Me? I'll be enjoying it NOW while you keep waiting for the future... :o)

jjanis
2008-02-20, 01:12
Somehow I think claims like "physical media is dead" are a bit premature. And the new HD content is The problem there.

Think about the bandwidth required to stream 1080p content to thousands and millions of customers. Can you imagine it becoming available anytime soon? I don't think so.

So, we are stuck with little plastic discs for quite some time as long as the HD content is considered.

JJanis

probedb
2008-02-20, 06:51
Discs will be around for a long time yet.

People that use forums like this assume that everyone out there has super fast broadband.

ADSL is the most prevalent in the UK and some people are lucky to see even 1Mbps if they're too far from the exchange.

I'd rather buy a disc than have to spend hours downloading a film only for it to disappear 24 hours after I've watched as it would under Xbox Live (or was that Apple TV?). Even worse is you have to watch within a set time.

toby10
2008-02-20, 06:55
Somehow I think claims like "physical media is dead" are a bit premature. And the new HD content is The problem there.

Think about the bandwidth required to stream 1080p content to thousands and millions of customers. Can you imagine it becoming available anytime soon? I don't think so.

So, we are stuck with little plastic discs for quite some time as long as the HD content is considered.

JJanis

And I think many are overlooking the advances in flash memory cards as a "physical media type". It won't be too much longer before we are buying 200gb (possibly into tb's) memory cards at reasonable prices that we can place into our wallets and take anywhere.

Zten
2008-02-20, 07:59
Think about the bandwidth required to stream 1080p content to thousands and millions of customers. Can you imagine it becoming available anytime soon? I don't think so.
JJanis

It will happen, but not for many more years. The BW is available now to make it a breeze(fiber to the home), its still just too expensive becuase of the infrasture investment that needs to be made. That is why DSL and Cable modems have been successfull-- they work on the already existing infrastructure. I have COMCAST cable service with streaming service they call ON DEMAND. It streams audio and video over the cable to my box. Even HD content in 1080i with Dolby Digital 5.1. So, actually, I think they could even do 1080p and uncompressed 5.1 audio (I'm guessing it would take twice as much more BW?). They are just waiting for more widespread adoption of 1080p before they begin to offer it (and probably charge more for it!) I'd say its still several years away, so that brings us back to my original point. Why wait? Players were as low as $299 last Christmas. I got my Blu Ray player for free with purchase of the TV last month. I bet now we'll see blu ray players under $200 by summer and maybe even a $129 unit by Christmas...

pfarrell
2008-02-20, 08:08
jjanis wrote:
> Think about the bandwidth required to stream 1080p content to thousands
> and millions of customers. Can you imagine it becoming available anytime
> soon? I don't think so.

Its available today in much of the developed world.
Not in most of the US because of monopoly telco resistance. Altho
Verizon is rolling out FIOS (fiber to the house) which is available
today in many areas. Korea and Japan are way ahead of the US in
broadband availability, faster and cheaper than we see in the US.

Your "soon" argument is just a question of timing. One can argue about
when 'soon' will be. There is no argument that very fast broadband is
coming and when it comes, the disk is dead.


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

Honva
2008-02-20, 08:31
Physical media is going to stay. More so for movies.

1. Bandwidth does not catch up fast enough. By the time you could download a Blu-ray disc fast enough, Sony will have Blu-ray Ultra with 2TB media supporting 4320p HD format.

2. Hard Disk size not catching up fast enough. A 500G drive could only store a dozen of movies. You also need to back up the hard drive otherwise you eventually lose it.

3. A typical movie you will watch it once every a few years. Why bother to use expensive online storage (Hard Disk) for it?

4. A typical movie will last about 2 hours, inserting a physical disc is not a incovenience. (Music is different, songs last 3-4min which would trigger a lot of disc swap.)

5. A lot of online movie purchase has "time limit". That is you can only watch it over a something like a 24-hour period. This is very wrong. It is more like rental only. When I buy I Blue-ray disc, I own it and can watch it later, give it to my friends or even sell it at a later day. It may even have investment value. (A lot of my LP collection could be sold for a price a lot higher than when I bought it.)

6. Physical media helps sales. A physical media on a shelf display in shops has advertising effect and could trigger more sales.

exile
2008-02-20, 08:36
one more voice to add into the mix... here's a great article about the current blu-ray situation and the future of media content.

http://library.creativecow.net/articles/wilson_tim/blu-ray.php

I'll add too that perhaps I'm a bit biased in my thinking because I work in television (I'm an editor of tv shows) and therefore I get to look at perfect uncompressed 1080i HD imagery on a daily basis and I'd still argue that receiving compressed HD content from a comcast (or similar provider) is just fine for the moment.

But in the end, I guess it's all up to the viewer's/listener's requirements for being satisfied. For me it's all about convenience and simplicity of delivery of that content.

pfarrell
2008-02-20, 09:02
exile wrote:
> one more voice to add into the mix... here's a great article about the
> current blu-ray situation and the future of media content.
>
> http://library.creativecow.net/articles/wilson_tim/blu-ray.php

Nice link. Especially like the quote from Bill Gates from 2005 that
HD/BR was the "last physical format"

But this thread is mostly just beliefs. You can't argue belief.


> I'll add too that perhaps I'm a bit biased in my thinking because I
> work in television (I'm an editor of tv shows) and therefore I get to
> look at perfect uncompressed 1080i HD imagery on a daily basis and I'd
> still argue that receiving compressed HD content from a comcast (or
> similar provider) is just fine for the moment.

uncompressed HD? I didn't think such stuff existed. I thought its all
compressed with MPEG or other codec, from the camera on.

I've done a bit of TV studio work, and even standard TV on a production
monitor is impressive.


--
Pat Farrell
http://www.pfarrell.com/

Pale Blue Ego
2008-02-20, 09:35
Yes, HD is compressed (mpeg) video. It has to be. Uncompressed 24-bit RGB images are 5.9 mb PER FRAME or 177 mbps. An HD transport stream is 19 mbps if you pull it in over the air. Cable companies compress it further to fit more channels through the pipe, so you're actually getting somewhere around 7-10 mpbs via Comcast.

Look at AppleTV...their movies aren't even DVD quality. Movies on disc will be around for a long time.

exile
2008-02-20, 10:42
yes, hd is compressed. I was referring to the notion of watching hd shot footage before it gets compressed by a cable provider like comcast.

cparker
2008-02-20, 10:58
Interesting article on theregister today, around ISPs and media streaming (legal) by the BBC using its iPlayer software.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/02/20/iplayer_isps_broke/

"In only its first month of service, iPlayer pushed up ISP costs by 200 per cent, from 6.1p per user to 18.3p per user"

Since Xmas I have noticed my BT unlimited broadband has become increasingly slower and I live in the countryside where I expect contention on the exchange is less :S (Though probably the kit isnt so strong as a town exchange to start with?)

Wonder how this will shake out...

zano65
2008-02-20, 13:46
Death of physical media is not only a technical problem. Imagine all the movies in servers where you must log in to watch a particular movie. Then imagine a new witch hunt or a puritanist regime, and all your favourite films are not available anymore. Seems a little far out at first, but it has already begun. Fans of Tex Avery have noticed that on the DVD box set some episodes are missing and others have been censored (for being "racist"). Worse, tv channels cannot air them even if they have the tapes.
A friend bought the box set and discovered that, luckyly we have old VHS tapes uncensored.
if you read french: http://martinwinckler.com/article.php3?id_article=121
or http://dvdfr.solexine.fr/news/news.php?id=2597
It's only cartoons, but on the other hand if they can do it to cartoons.... If things go on the way it has begun, there will be no more dvds, no more cds, and even no more books (owned by google), we will depend on the will of governments or big companies.
It's a little bit "Orwellian",i reckon, but maybe there's some truth in it.
A very angry tex Avery fan,
Jean

mikerob
2008-02-20, 14:08
jjanis wrote:
> Think about the bandwidth required to stream 1080p content to thousands
> and millions of customers. Can you imagine it becoming available anytime
> soon? I don't think so.

Its available today in much of the developed world.
Not in most of the US because of monopoly telco resistance. Altho
Verizon is rolling out FIOS (fiber to the house) which is available
today in many areas. Korea and Japan are way ahead of the US in
broadband availability, faster and cheaper than we see in the US.



In Korea, Japan and some European countries, a high proportion of people live in urban apartment blocks so it is economical to run fibre to the basement. The economics are tougher to serve suburban areas with smaller population densities.

MuckleEck
2008-02-22, 04:03
It seems that JohnLewis in the UK have decided to sell off all the Toshiba HD-DVD players cheap...99 is the current price for one...

Pale Blue Ego
2008-02-22, 12:08
In some instances, DVD collections of TV shows have been altered not because of censorship, but due to music royalties. I forget which series it was, but it was one which used music of the period to great effect (Wonder Years? Northern Exposure?). Anyway, they stripped out all the good music and put in generic stuff for the DVD collection.

Kevin Lepard
2008-02-22, 12:23
I suspect you're thinking of "WKRP in Cincinnati"

Kevin

On Feb 22, 2008, at 11:08 , Pale Blue Ego wrote:

>
> In some instances, DVD collections of TV shows have been altered not
> because of censorship, but due to music royalties. I forget which
> series it was, but it was one which used music of the period to great
> effect (Wonder Years? Northern Exposure?). Anyway, they stripped out
> all the good music and put in generic stuff for the DVD collection.
>
>
> --
> Pale Blue Ego
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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> View this thread: http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?t=43609
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