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Gus
2008-01-13, 03:17
I was wondering if anyone knows of an app that can be used to trawl through an existing library on a hard drive to convert audio files from MP3, WAV, RMJ, etc and convert all to FLAC.

I'd be grateful hearing of any experiences or recommendations.

Cheers,
Gus

c0utta
2008-01-13, 03:48
Hi Gus,

Get hold of foobar and the FLAC install package. Load your music library into foobar, then select all, right click, convert and choose FLAC. You may need to setup a FLAC "preset" that suits your tastes (compression ratios etc). You may also need to tell foobar where to find FLAC.EXE the first time you do a conversion.

I only did this yesterday, and can confirm it works just fine.

Cheers,

c0utta

davep
2008-01-13, 03:49
Various programs like Foobar and Winamp can do bulk conversions (although I'm not sure if they handle RMJ) but I would ask why you would want to do this in the first place? Flac is a good way of storing music files when you want to compress from the original full depth file, such as those ripped from a CD, but there is little point that I can see in making a flac from an mp3 and this may even result in further degradation of the sound quality.

If your wav files are taken straight from CD's then flac would be a good way to make them smaller without any loss of quality and with the ability to add tags, but other than those it seems not to add any value.

davep

Mnyb
2008-01-13, 05:00
To strees the facts (as this is the begginers section):

Lossy formats is.. lossy you can never restore the music to what is was before the lossy compression.

The fact that you can make wav or flac out off mp3, does not change that it, will sound the same as the mp3 and is still an aproximation off the original source.

To make it even worse change from a lossy format to another lossy formats compounds error's and make's thing s realy bad.

My humble advice is(gained trough experience):

Rip in a lossless format do never ever rip lossy, no no don't.
it will always come back and bite you, it may take years but it always will.

Sean_W_Smith
2008-01-13, 18:24
dbPowerAmp has a great batch converter I use to convert SHN to FLAC....

Sean

mflint
2008-01-14, 02:09
There is no reason to transcode mp3 to flac - the quality won't change at all.

Two reasons *not* to transcode mp3 to flac:
1. the flac file will use ten times the disk space
2. you lose knowledge about which flac files are from lossless sources (so can be transcoded to lossy) and which flacs are from lossy sources (so shouldn't be transcoded to lossy)

Skittler
2008-01-14, 05:46
I agree entirely with mflint and Mnyb.

You will gain nothing by converting MP3 to FLAC, and will lose a couple of things, particuarly disk space and the ability to tell the difference between FLACs with full data and those without.

If they are your MP3s (ripped from your own CDs) then it really is worth the initial pain to re-rip to FLAC. You can also create a parallel MP3 version (at 128 kbps, say) to save space for a portable player.

If they are not your MP3s (naughty boy) then your starting position is lossy data, so there's no way to improve it.

Gus
2008-01-14, 19:07
Thanks for all the comments. The rationale of converting mp3 to flac was that I'd seen somewhere that the squeezebox could have troubles seeing certain formats - so having everything in one format made sense and I was thinking if there was means of doing this in bulk without further degradation, then it was worth exploring. Given the comments here, I'll give that a miss and re-rip what I've got from the originals to flac.

Does flac as a format embed DRM? Want to avoid this, as I don't want to have to re-rip when I change hard drives.

Cheers,
Gus

smc2911
2008-01-14, 19:52
Does flac as a format embed DRM? Want to avoid this, as I don't want to have to re-rip when I change hard drives.
Definitely no DRM in flac.

JimC
2008-01-14, 19:53
Thanks for all the comments. The rationale of converting mp3 to flac was that I'd seen somewhere that the squeezebox could have troubles seeing certain formats - so having everything in one format made sense and I was thinking if there was means of doing this in bulk without further degradation, then it was worth exploring. Given the comments here, I'll give that a miss and re-rip what I've got from the originals to flac.

Does flac as a format embed DRM? Want to avoid this, as I don't want to have to re-rip when I change hard drives.

Cheers,
Gus

FLAC, as a format, has nothing to do with DRM. Neither does AAC, MP3 or WMA for that matter. DRM is simply a wrapper that encloses and locks the data (in this case, the music). IF you have the proper key, you can unlock the DRM and retrieve the data.

For the most part, any DRMs can be applied to any compression format. The DRM is most often applied to the file at the time it is ripped and compressed. If you're using Windows Media Player, for example, there's an option to "secure" your music when you rip it (or there used to be, it's been a while since I used WMP). If you had selected it, you would have ended up with DRM-protected WMA files. Bad format AND unusable -- YIKES!

At any rate, if the program you're using to create the FLAC files--EAC, foobar2000, etc.--would have to be capable of applying DRM *and* set up to do so. I know that EAC has no provision for applying DRM, as that's what I use for riping CDs to FLAC.

And, to answer your first question, DON'T transcode your files from MP3 to FLAC. It's not worth doing. However, do yourself a huge favor and rip all your future music to FLAC. You can use something like foobar2000 to bulk transcode the FLAC files to MP3 for use on your MP3 player/iPod.


-=> Jim