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View Full Version : Can SB3 decode a DTS signal?



gutted
2007-11-03, 01:34
I'm in process of re-ripping my CDs to FLAC. To speed up the process, I've started looking for torrents of stuff that I already own (e.g. where someone has already done the work and ripped stuff to FLAC for me :)

I recently downloaded a FLAC encoded CD which apparently has something to do with DTS. There's a readme file included with the download which says "Warning - make sure your system can read a DTS signal". I tried out one of the tracks, but SB3 just outputs a bunch of white noise.

I guess this means that SB3 (or slimserver) can't decode DTS? Is there a way round this, or is it easier to just dig out the original CD and rip it myself?

Cheers!
Dan.

gutted
2007-11-03, 05:34
I've done some searching on this forum, and it looks like maybe SB can play the FLAC files but only depending on the sample rate (?) they were encoded at.

Er... Any way I can re-encode them using metaflac or something? What's the deal with DTS anyway - is it actually worth any effort? As per original post, I actually have the original CD stashed in the attic so it's no great trauma to actually rip from the original - but in trying to save myself some time I've become kind of intrigued by the idea of DTS... What's it all about, anyway?

BigTony
2007-11-03, 07:13
DTS is the audio found on DVD's - likely to be in 5.1 surround sound. To listen to this you need an amp that can handle 5.1 audio, then if you input via digital from your SB3 to the amp, you can here it in DTS. If not, you are better off going for the CD and rip it, as I don't think ripping the standard stereo mix from a DTS disk is that simple, and as you have the disk, I'd do that.

There have been many DTS versions of classic rock cd's - most of them ahve been fan made using the standard CD as the source and then mixing to DTS - many AV amps can do this on the fly so no real gain (and many PC's can do the same thing), some have been mixed from quad sources (Vinyl or 8-track cassette), and some are official DTS mixes. To be honest I was quite excited when I first got hold of DTS mixes, but the novelty wore off and I find that I prefer standard stereo mix. Having said that, I do like to switch my AV amp to 'ROck Stadium' for live shows as that can beef up your standard 'thin' audience recording.

I hope this helps

BT

tyler_durden
2007-11-03, 08:21
snip... where someone has already done the work and ripped stuff to FLAC for me :)

I recently downloaded a FLAC encoded CD which apparently has something to do with DTS. snip...
Dan.


snip... As per original post, I actually have the original CD stashed in the attic so it's no great trauma to actually rip from the original - but in trying to save myself some time I've become kind of intrigued by the idea of DTS... What's it all about, anyway?

If you're going to DL music and don't want anyone to know you need to tell a consistent story. No one here cares where you got your music. Just ask your question about DTS and be done with it.

I'm 99.9% sure that the SB3 doesn't decode DTS.

TD

Eric Seaberg
2007-11-03, 08:24
I have about 20 SACDs and another 20 DVD-As. Most of the DVD-A also have a regular DVD layer that has DTS and/or AC3 5.1 mixes.

There is a thread on the forum about extracting the AC3 and DTS streams. I have done this on as many of my discs as I can. They are converted to WAV files using a script one of the users has written, then I convert that to FLAC with full tags. They play great, but as mentioned above, your playback amp does need DTS and/or AC3 decoding built in.

DTS and AC3 streams will automatically down-mix from the 5.1 to stereo if you want to listen that way instead, but I prefer the surround mixes... that's why I bought them in the first place.

gutted
2007-11-03, 11:25
If you're going to DL music and don't want anyone to know you need to tell a consistent story. No one here cares where you got your music. Just ask your question about DTS and be done with it.

I'm 99.9% sure that the SB3 doesn't decode DTS.

TD

TD - I actually own the CD. I can provide a picture of the case and CD, plus a newspaper confirming the date if it would turn you on. It's currently with the majority of my other albums in a flight case in the attic (hence why I've not ripped it myself yet).

Yes - I am downloading music. Music that I already own. I'm not entirely sure why that should be a problem for you. It's not a problem for me, and I make no secret of it. I'm of the impression that if I own the original recording, then there should be no problem in downloading the FLAC-encoded format. Please correct me if I'm wrong here. Clearly you have very low opinions of some people who post here, and I'm particularly flattered that you think I'm a thief; I'd be grateful, however, if you could let me know if my understanding is incorrect. Namely am I not allowed to download an album if I own the original? Contrary to your apparent belief, I'm not "telling stories" and I'm actually kind of fussy when it comes to owning a proper copy of the music I have in my library. I appreciate that my original copy is not DTS - I thought that the DTS was added or encoded during ripping. If I'm wrong, then fair enough and I'll delete the DTS version (since I don't own a legal copy of it). Please enlighten me.

By the way... I'm not entirely sure - even after re-reading your post - why you think I'm telling some sort of story. Perhaps you can elaboarate?

Meantime - cheers to the other guys who've offered me something useful. I don't have a suitable amp, so unless it's easy to re-encode/transcode then I'm wait till I get the rest of the albums down and start working through them. I've only recently finished ripping my CD singles and it was a bit of a chore - not looking forward to working my way through all the albums (again :)

oreillymj
2007-11-03, 15:09
BTW - if you try playing your flac/DTS files over the analog outs, then obviously you'll get white noise. You need a digital connection to a surround amp and here's the important bit.

DO NOT let the server/SB make any changes to the bitstream on it's way to the amp otherwise the DTS header info get corrupted and the amp does not know that it is being sent a surround mix.

In practice all this means is switching off the digital volume control/replaygain so the SB outputs the bitstream exactly the way it was sent.

gutted
2007-11-03, 15:49
Cool - thanks dude. But again - I don't have a suitable amp, so it looks like that one's no good to me :( It's no great shame, as it's only an extra few mins to rip the CD when I get round to it I guess. Appreciate your advice though - cheers again.

Dan.

Bizarroterl
2007-11-05, 17:24
DTS recordings (official) are not the same as standard redbook CDs. To legally use them you must have purchased the original DTS recording.

So to remain legal you must delete the DTS downloads if you don't have the original DTS recording.

gutted
2007-11-06, 07:44
Ah-ha. That's something I didn't realise and it's good to know. Many thanks for this info, dude. I'll ditch that download once I get back home.