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View Full Version : Best NAS at a reasonable price?



Maverickman
2007-09-18, 00:06
I've recently purchased a set of AVI ADM9's and an SB3, I want to add a NAS box because my iMac sometimes turns into a hoover halfway through listening to some music (lot's of fan noise).

I'm looking at the QNap TS-109 or Buffalo Linkstation (Live or Pro).... problem is I'm concerned that I'll struggle to get Slimserver working on the Buffalo (but it is 100 cheaper). Any other suggestions and how easy is it to hack the Buffalo.

I don't have space (and like the idea of lower power consumption of a NAS) for a second (older) Powermac so that isn't really an option, all advice gratefully received....

colin_young
2007-09-18, 06:23
I bought a LinkStation Pro, and now that I know the trick to installing Slimserver, it isn't all that difficult to do. Good instructions are here (post 96): http://forums.slimdevices.com/showthread.php?p=226687

The most worrisome part of the whole process is all the error messages that you need to ignore.

I have MySql 5.0.41, not .45, but everything is working.

Colin

merc4a2
2007-09-18, 21:40
I bought the rackmount ReadyNAS1100 and it's been awesome, which actually runs slimserver right on the NAS. I'll have to admit performance of queries on slimserver are too slow and I'll be moving slimserver to a faster server (when I get around to buying one), but as a NAS it's an amazing device for the $$$.

Regards,
Mike

MelonMonkey
2007-09-19, 12:32
Buy a Mac mini. Faster than the NAS in every way and might cost you the same money (depending on which mini you buy and where - definitely buy it used if the price is right).

One MAJOR problem with current pre-built NAS solutions like ReadyNAS is that they're slower than molasses. At this point I wouldn't run one even if it were given to me for free - with hard drives and all.

Maverickman
2007-09-20, 00:23
That's thrown a spanner in the works.... Mac Mini hmmmm, how quiet is the mini? I could connect my current bluetooth keyboard and mouse but would need a monitor, knowing Macs though it wouldn't need a monitor attaching very often (apart from adding music).

I'd already ordered a TS-109 and it's been despatched, might keep it boxed and think more about the mac mini, noise is a concern as is the final cost - mini, external HD, monitor, maybe keyboard and mouse. I only paid 200 for the QNap.....

aubuti
2007-09-20, 11:05
I'm not a Mac user, but since OS X is based on BSD/unix shouldn't you be able to run the Mac mini "headless" via a telnet or ssh session on your iMac? That would mean that you don't need a keyboard, mouse, or monitor to control the Mac mini. Likewise, it can stay tucked away out of sight.

ob_kook
2007-09-20, 11:21
My disclaimer is that I work for DataCore, but I'll try to keep any bias out of it.

I used DataCore's SANmelody Lite software to put together an iSCSI SAN using an old PC and a bunch of mismatched disk drives. The beauty of this system is that it serves block level I/O as opposed to file shares, so I can create and serve LUN's to any PC on my network, regardless of O/S.

The other thing I like about it is the performance - since it utilizes a portion of the memory as dedicated I/O cache it is much faster than a NAS. Mine has 1.5GB cache across Gigabit ethernet, and it is a lot faster than any internal disk ever was.

I also was worried about noise, but since it is a standard
pc as the platform, I easily replaced the PSU and case fan, and it is now virtually silent.

Anyway, I'm not trying to advertise (our true market is enterprise datacenters...), but I thought this might be an interesting solution for many here.

Kook

chepnut
2007-09-20, 12:38
My disclaimer is that I work for DataCore, but I'll try to keep any bias out of it.

I used DataCore's SANmelody Lite software to put together an iSCSI SAN using an old PC and a bunch of mismatched disk drives. The beauty of this system is that it serves block level I/O as opposed to file shares, so I can create and serve LUN's to any PC on my network, regardless of O/S.

The other thing I like about it is the performance - since it utilizes a portion of the memory as dedicated I/O cache it is much faster than a NAS. Mine has 1.5GB cache across Gigabit ethernet, and it is a lot faster than any internal disk ever was.

I also was worried about noise, but since it is a standard
pc as the platform, I easily replaced the PSU and case fan, and it is now virtually silent.

Anyway, I'm not trying to advertise (our true market is enterprise datacenters...), but I thought this might be an interesting solution for many here.

Kook

Can you go into a little more detail on how this actually works.

ob_kook
2007-09-20, 12:55
Can you go into a little more detail on how this actually works.

Sure. DataCore makes storage controller software - like what you would normally find as embedded software/firmware on large external storage controllers - except it is portable and runs on open systems. You install this on a pc and it puts a snap-in to the MMC. This is now a dedicated storage server (or a SAN)

Any storage that the PC can "see" (internal, external, RAID, USB etc)can be brought into the pool(s), and you in turn use the software to create a "disk" or LUN, then present it over your network to any of the other computers on it. To them, it looks like a raw disk that they initialize, format, and begin using.

There is a descrption of it on the website at: http://datacore.com/products/prod_SANmelodyLite.asp

and some flash movies of the inerface at: http://www.datacore.com/vmreg/videos/videoindex.asp

I'd recommend checking out the "exchange server" one and consider that this would be the "Slimserver" in your own system.

webfoot_tech
2007-09-22, 08:00
Here are a couple Linux appliances (appliances meaning you download an iso, burn a cd, and these NAS systems install automatically, so you don't have to know anything about Linux).

FreeNAS is smaller/faster meant for old/slow hardware or embedded systems:

http://www.freenas.org/

Openfiler is bigger, but with more features and not meant for slow servers:

http://www.openfiler.com/

In general, FreeNAS is probably much easier to setup for a newbie and has won some open source awards, it's VERY nice. I don't know why anyone would buy a NAS with something like FreeNAS out there, the small consumer level NAS devices are kinda slow (not to mention expensive). Hope this info helps.