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alextegg
2007-08-13, 09:09
A query about something that has bugged me for as long as I've had my Slim and then SB3.

I rip new music regularly, and generally want to listen to the newly added stuff, so I go to the New Music section in the web interface or device menu. This is great, and I can add the 8 or so latest added albums into a temporary playlist and listen to them.

However, if I ever do any 'data cleansing' on old ripped albums, or regenerate my library in any way, old albums jump to the top of the list.

This appears to be because the "New Music" list is based on "Date Modified" not "Date Added". Is this correct? What am I doing wrong? How can I fix it?

Any assistance gratefully received.

Alex

Mark Lanctot
2007-08-13, 09:23
This appears to be because the "New Music" list is based on "Date Modified" not "Date Added". Is this correct? What am I doing wrong? How can I fix it?

Yes, that's correct. You're not doing anything wrong.

About the only thing you can do is when you edit tags - some tagging programs like Mp3tag can modify tags without updating the modification time code. But if you alter album art, rename files or move them around, your OS will update the modification date and there's nothing you can do about it.

alextegg
2007-08-13, 09:24
So why doesn't New music look at Date added, rather than date modified, it would seem logical to me!?!?!

JJZolx
2007-08-13, 09:38
This appears to be because the "New Music" list is based on "Date Modified" not "Date Added". Is this correct? What am I doing wrong? How can I fix it?

Date added isn't worth much if (like most of us) you ever do a clear/rescan of your library. A couple things you can do to avoid the phenomena you're seeing:

1. Use a tagging program that is capable of modifying files while preserving their date modified. Mp3tag can do this: http://www.mp3tag.de/en

2. Find a 'touch' program that can change the date modified, so that after modifying the file you can reset its modified timestamp. This is less convenient, as it's both an extra step and it requires you to note or remember the approximate date of the old timestamp. In Windows I use Attribute Changer: http://webplaza.pt.lu/~rpetges/windows/ac/ac.html

I tend to use both. If I forget to do #1, then I go back and change the timestamps using the approximate date/time of other files in the folder.