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Kyle
2007-07-23, 10:54
I need a new hard drive for my music files. In the past, I have bought external hard drives, but they tend to wear out rather quickly. Would an internal be more durable, and what brands are the best?

mflint
2007-07-23, 11:14
You may find that the USB or firewire enclosure may not expose all of the drive's powersaving capabilities compared to fitting the drive internally.

But whether that has good or bad effects on reliability is open to debate!

amcluesent
2007-07-23, 11:18
IMHO it's heat that kills drive. An internal drive with a fan placed to put airflow over the casing is best

pfarrell
2007-07-23, 11:35
Kyle wrote:
> I need a new hard drive for my music files. In the past, I have bought
> external hard drives, but they tend to wear out rather quickly. Would
> an internal be more durable, and what brands are the best?

As others have posted, heat is the death of hard drives.
On one side, an external enclosure may have more exposure to cool air,
but it may not be well engineered for heat transfer.

The classic traceoff is price per megabyte and reliability. Look at
"server drives" as they are much more reliable. They are also much more
expensive.

haunyack
2007-07-23, 11:47
I need a new hard drive for my music files. In the past, I have bought external hard drives, but they tend to wear out rather quickly. Would an internal be more durable, and what brands are the best?

The Western Digital "Raptor" is a very sturdy drive with a 5 year warranty.

I have been using 2 WDC36 & 2 WDC74 drives for nearly 3 years without a hitch.
A drive that spins at 10,000 rpm and performs as flawlessly as these do has some great engineering behind it.

Spendy, but not quite as expensive as some of the server discs.

.

exile
2007-07-23, 11:51
my two cents-- when it comes to drives, don't go for the bargains. I think it's all about quality manufacturers. I've worked with la cie drives both professionally (i'm a television editor) and personally and in my experience (ten years working with their drives) la cie drives are consistently high quality and long lasting and they also make very durable enclosures for their external drives.

JJZolx
2007-07-23, 12:31
The Western Digital "Raptor" is a very sturdy drive with a 5 year warranty.

I have been using 2 WDC36 & 2 WDC74 drives for nearly 3 years without a hitch.
A drive that spins at 10,000 rpm and performs as flawlessly as these do has some great engineering behind it.

Spendy, but not quite as expensive as some of the server discs.

Compared with the newest 7200RPM drives available, WD Raptors are hot, noisy, and pricey per Gigabyte. I have several, but use them exclusively for system disks. Not recommended for music storage. IMO.

haunyack
2007-07-23, 13:04
Compared with the newest 7200RPM drives available, WD Raptors are hot, noisy, and pricey per Gigabyte. I have several, but use them exclusively for system disks. Not recommended for music storage. IMO.

Hot - any drive runs warm without proper ventilation.
Noisy - my case fan emits more noise than 4 Raptors together.
Pricey per gigabyte - cheap drives (you get what you pay for) low mttf,loss of data,replacement expense on failure.

A major drawback with the Raptor is it's low capacity.

.

JJZolx
2007-07-23, 13:06
I need a new hard drive for my music files. In the past, I have bought external hard drives, but they tend to wear out rather quickly. Would an internal be more durable, and what brands are the best?

Your drives aren't "wearing out". They're failing. Drives do wear out over time, but it should take years. Are you carrying them around a lot or abusing them in any other way?

Interesting article regarding heat and drives: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2007/022607-google-disk-drives.html

JJZolx
2007-07-23, 13:24
Hot - any drive runs warm without proper ventilation.

10,000 RPM drives tend to run hotter than 7200 RPM drives. That's a unavoidable byproduct of the higher spindle speed. If they were widely available, for music storage I'd recommend going in the opposite direction and using 5400RPM drives. More than fast enough for anything a music server will ask of them, and would be both cooler and quieter than faster drives.


Noisy - my case fan emits more noise than 4 Raptors together.

Disk seeks from my Raptors are all considerably more noisy than any of the 7200 RPM drives that I use. Also, many people with dog ears will hear the higher pitched whine produced by the higher rotatational speed.


Pricey per gigabyte - cheap drives = low mttf,loss of data,replacement expense on failure.

I certainly wouldn't characterize the Raptors as enterprise class drives. I'd never remotely consider one as a replacement for SCSI or SAS drives in a mission critical server. Whether they occupy a niche space somewhere between that and desktop drives is debatable.

Kyle
2007-07-23, 14:52
Your drives aren't "wearing out". They're failing. Drives do wear out over time, but it should take years. Are you carrying them around a lot or abusing them in any other way?

Interesting article regarding heat and drives: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2007/022607-google-disk-drives.html

Not carrying them around, but if running all the time is considered abuse, then I guess I am abusing them. The latest failure is a Fantom drive that has become an "unrecognized USB device." It works intermittently and then is not recognized.

JJZolx
2007-07-23, 15:12
Not carrying them around, but if running all the time is considered abuse, then I guess I am abusing them. The latest failure is a Fantom drive that has become an "unrecognized USB device." It works intermittently and then is not recognized.

Sounds like it's the USB interface rather than the drive. You can probably pick up another USB enclosure for not much cash. Make sure you know the drive size (3.5" or 2.5") and whether the drive interface is SATA or IDE. You'll probably need to open the existing enclosure to figure it out.

http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategory=92&name=External-Enclosures

Jim Bailey
2007-07-23, 16:11
I've been contemplating how to go about adding extra HD space as well. I like the idea of putting two drives into something like the Thecus N2050UD [I haven't confirmed that it has a fan yet] and two 500 GB drives (using one to backup the other). I'm also thinking the drives ought to be designed for continous playback (I listen to music all day long) so something like the Seagate DB35 series would seem to make sense to me. Anybody think of why this would not be a good idea?

For the Thecus thingie see: http://www.thecus.com/products_over.php?cid=1&pid=3

For the Seagate DB35 see www.seagate.com and search for DB35.

haunyack
2007-07-23, 18:01
I've been contemplating how to go about adding extra HD space as well. I like the idea of putting two drives into something like the Thecus N2050UD [I haven't confirmed that it has a fan yet] and two 500 GB drives (using one to backup the other). I'm also thinking the drives ought to be designed for continous playback (I listen to music all day long) so something like the Seagate DB35 series would seem to make sense to me. Anybody think of why this would not be a good idea?

For the Thecus thingie see: http://www.thecus.com/products_over.php?cid=1&pid=3

For the Seagate DB35 see www.seagate.com and search for DB35.

The Seagate looks awesome.
I've had a few DM drives over the years and have had very good luck with them.
Overall, Seagate drives are topnotch.

.

Kyle
2007-07-24, 05:56
Sounds like it's the USB interface rather than the drive. You can probably pick up another USB enclosure for not much cash. Make sure you know the drive size (3.5" or 2.5") and whether the drive interface is SATA or IDE. You'll probably need to open the existing enclosure to figure it out.

http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategory=92&name=External-Enclosures

I would agree that it's probably the interface, and if I didn't have my music files backed up, I might consider spending $60 on a new enclosure just to recover them. But wouldn't it make more sense to spend $15 more on an internal drive like this: http://www.buy.com/prod/seagate-barracuda-7200-10-hard-drive-250gb-7200rpm-100mbps-ultra-ata/q/loc/101/202701408.html.

MrSinatra
2007-07-26, 11:42
i also only use raptors for system drives, and they are WELL WORTH IT for that use.

i use www.tomshardware.com to review all manner of stuff and they do a great job on drives.

i haven't done this yet, but i will get a raid box one day...

for as much time as i put into ripping and archiving and generallly screwing around and wasting time with my music, raid is the surefire backup system i need. plus, it can backup my other data too. its almost impossible to lose raid data, as long as you monitor it.

personally, i like the infrant raid boxes. (used at the radio station)

and if you get one, using xraid it can dynamically increase volume size as you swap larger discs in.

it also has the added benefit of allowing you to not really care too much what HDs you use, and gives you the option to wait until larger sizes than you have become more standard and drop in price.

Ben Sandee
2007-07-26, 12:44
On 7/26/07, MrSinatra <
MrSinatra.2ucd4z1185475501 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com> wrote:
>
>
> for as much time as i put into ripping and archiving and generallly
> screwing around and wasting time with my music, raid is the surefire
> backup system i need. plus, it can backup my other data too. its
> almost impossible to lose raid data, as long as you monitor it.


# sudo
# rm -rf /

Woops! Then of course there are fires, floods, toddlers, pets -- RAID won't
protect you from any of those things. So, it's not a backup solution but an
availability solution. If you want a 'surefire' backup solution, look at an
off-site backup of some sort. I rsync periodically to a computer in another
state.

Ben

pfarrell
2007-07-26, 12:58
Ben Sandee wrote:
> # sudo
> # rm -rf /
>
> Woops!

Don't even write that. I worked at a place, someone did just that, took
days to restore, wrote it on the wall, the boss came in and said
"interesting, I'll try it" and before we could all yell "NO" he did it.
Again.

Very ugly.

--
Pat
http://www.pfarrell.com/music/slimserver/slimsoftware.html

Kyle
2007-07-27, 02:47
After having to rerip my entire music collection about 18 months ago, I now have two backups in two different locations. Keeping them all synced is a pain, but I don't add music that often.