PDA

View Full Version : Does changing iTunes import to MP3 remove protection



Robert Vivian
2007-04-15, 08:58
I purchased two albums from iTunes that defaulted to AAC import. SlimServer cannot see these albums. Can I change the import format to MP3 and get around this problem so that I can play music purchased from iTunes on the Squeezebox or will the MP3 files also be protected?

ddewey
2007-04-15, 09:12
Quoting Robert Vivian (Robert.Vivian.2p39hz1176652802 (AT) no-mx (DOT) forums.slimdevices.com):

>
> I purchased two albums from iTunes that defaulted to AAC import.
> SlimServer cannot see these albums. Can I change the import format to
> MP3 and get around this problem so that I can play music purchased from
> iTunes on the Squeezebox or will the MP3 files also be protected?
>

No. Music purchased from the iTunes store is encrypted and cannot
be decrypted via iTunes. That will change somewhat when Apple
finally begins selling drm-free content from EMI and others in the
near future.

To decrypt the purchased files, do a Google search for'QTFairUse.'
Note that this is probably illegal, but will allow you to use your
purchased songs on any device you wish including your Squeezebox.

Anne
2007-04-16, 04:29
Burn the albums on a cd-r, and then import the albums again from that cd-r, now the protection is gone.
Then you can copy the albums to whatever format you want.

tomjtx
2007-04-16, 04:34
Burn the albums on a cd-r, and then import the albums again from that cd-r, now the protection is gone.
Then you can copy the albums to whatever format you want.


Someone more tech savy than I said:
You have to re import it as lossless or you will decrease the bitrate and have an even more lossy file

adamslim
2007-04-16, 08:21
Someone more tech savy than I said:
You have to re import it as lossless or you will decrease the bitrate and have an even more lossy file

That's because the file will have been compressed once to AAC, then again to MP3. This is likely to sound much worse than just one compression step. Any conversions between lossy formats are, well, not things to talk about on the audiophile forum!

However, lossless is probably overkill - ripping to 256 or 320 should preserve 99+% of the original fidelity, I would have thought. Anyone done any tests on this?

Adam

Mark Lanctot
2007-04-16, 13:03
However, lossless is probably overkill - ripping to 256 or 320 should preserve 99+% of the original fidelity, I would have thought.

You should convert to lossless more so you wouldn't have two perceptual coding algorithms fighting each other, AAC vs. MP3 in this case. You've already lost some audio data in the original encode, you don't want to lose more, and the only way to do this is to encode lossless.