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View Full Version : EMI Abandoning DRM



earthbased
2007-04-04, 12:02
Now only if they would release the recordings in FLAC format!

CatBus
2007-04-04, 13:27
One serious iTunes peeve down (at least regarding EMI music), several pet ones remaining:

1) Theoretically, I don't mind lossy, as long as it's transparent and in my preferred format. The problem is the latter, which leads to transcoding, which in turn ruins the former. So I'd also like to see lossless (I'd prefer FLAC, but would settle for ALAC--as long as it's DRM-free).

2) I'd like to be able to buy songs that are only for sale through a foreign iTunes store even though I live in the US. You'd think that wouldn't be so hard. Sheesh!

3) I want a web interface. I hate having to install some thick client just to download music.

Pale Blue Ego
2007-04-04, 13:44
They aren't quite abandoning DRM - the regular-priced tracks are still 128k and still have DRM. I don't see why they wouldn't strip the DRM from these also, as they are less likely to be traded than the 256k tracks which have no DRM.

And, they are charging a 30-cent premium for the DRM-free tracks. It's not clear whether this is because of the higher bitrate or because of no DRM. Probably both. I guess they want to see how it flies and if the tracks show up on P2P systems.

snarlydwarf
2007-04-04, 13:58
EMI has also said they want to work with other online vendors (Rhapsody, Yahoo, Napster, Walmart, Emusic) and let vendors set their own price/quality balance. So maybe it would be $1.29/track for a 256kAAC at iTunes, but an upstart like Emusic could have a lower price or higher bitrate mp3 as a draw, while Walmart could just target the low end and do 128k but "This will play on your iPod and Zune!" push... and keep their price the same. Maybe some will offer "download the whole album as lossless, including cover art in 1200x1200 for $10!"

It sounds like a very good business move and should help the consumers as more vendors sign on and determine how they plan to deal with it.

Pale Blue Ego
2007-04-04, 17:51
Anything that's better value for the consumer is a step in the right direction. Charging more for lossy, protected files than it costs for the actual CD was always a questionable strategy IMO.

Timothy Stockman
2007-04-10, 03:01
I'd like to be able to buy songs that are only for sale through a foreign iTunes store even though I live in the US. You'd think that wouldn't be so hard. Sheesh!

I recently tried to purchase Christina Sturmer's "Lebe Lauter" album from iTunes. It was available from iTunes Austria, but I couldn't buy it in the US. I ended up getting the the CD on Ebay from a record shop in Austria who shipped it to me in the US. The CD is not dead, yet!

EMI and others will have to:
1) Offer lossless.
2) Offer their entire catalog, not just selected titles.
before we are on the road to nailing the lid on CD's coffin.

Ognomm
2007-04-10, 03:15
Just dropping DRM can't stop pirates. They need to actually give pirates a fight, no DRM, lossless, and don't raise the price!

Allofmp3 earned billions, and if the big legal record labels starts in the same direction as allofmp3, and raise the prices a little bit more than them, they would earn even more than they do now, or atleast earn the same, and not force the consumer to become criminals.

BigTony
2007-04-10, 05:19
One serious iTunes peeve down (at least regarding EMI music), several pet ones remaining:

2) I'd like to be able to buy songs that are only for sale through a foreign iTunes store even though I live in the US. You'd think that wouldn't be so hard. Sheesh!



The problem with this is that the rights to the music are sold in regions, which is why services such as Pandora are only available in the USA.

I've never bought anything from Itunes, I like to sniff my vinyl before I play it!

BT

CatBus
2007-04-11, 15:33
The problem with this is that the rights to the music are sold in regions, which is why services such as Pandora are only available in the USA.

I've never bought anything from Itunes, I like to sniff my vinyl before I play it!

BT

Oh, I understand. The same deal with DVD regions, etc. I could have sworn contracts between companies designed specifically to restrict production, distribution, or price were illegal...