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haunyack
2007-03-15, 10:11
So my sig-other buys me a stack (100) of CD-R's - TDK to be exact.

Not so sure about the quality as it seems 1 in 5 burn w/errors.

What's the consensus here concerning best quality (price no object) CD-R's for burning audio?

Cheers to the house!

.

Steven Moore
2007-03-15, 10:19
I just use supermarket (Tesco at the minute) brand discs and never get burn errors.

If you haven't tried it try reducing burn speed, it might help.



Using either itunes or toast on a pioneer 111d drive on a Mac.

haunyack
2007-03-15, 10:24
I just use supermarket (Tesco at the minute) brand discs and never get burn errors.

If you haven't tried it try reducing burn speed, it might help.



Using either itunes or toast on a pioneer 111d drive on a Mac.

Thanks for the info.
I burn my CD's at X8 w/Nero (lowest setting available) or X1 with EAC.
I do not think my burners are defective - HP-640c / Lite-on SOHW 1213S.

This stack of TDK's just got me wondering if I could do better without all the coasters that have cropped up around the house lately.

.

Steven Moore
2007-03-15, 11:42
Maybe your burner is a bit fussy on the cdr brand.
I also tend to stop all activity when burning. ie don't download or use any apps during the process. Maybe I'm being superstitious but interruptions to the process are not good.

Skunk
2007-03-15, 11:44
I haven't gotten errors burning discs since the days of buffer underruns, but perhaps I don't burn enough of them. It has been suggested here that standalone cd burners create better sounding copies, but I'm not sure if the brand/dye color matters, or if that's even factual.

Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs makes gold CD-r blanks, as does Kodak and some other less recognizable brands.

My question is, are they archival only because of the properties of the dye in CD-r, and likely not to sound any better than other color dyes (black comes to mind..)?

It seems pressed CDs use the gold in a different way, and I don't think the gold makes them sound better (as opposed to mastering), but I could be wrong.

haunyack
2007-03-15, 11:50
Maybe your burner is a bit fussy on the cdr brand.
I also tend to stop all activity when burning. ie don't download or use any apps during the process. Maybe I'm being superstitious but interruptions to the process are not good.

Thanks Steven,

Actually I tend to do the same thing when I burn audio.
Shut down all unnecessary process's and go find something to do while burning.

What really piqued my interest is the fact that these disk's don't do well with either of my burner's and it got me wondering about CD quality of the different manufacturer's

Therefore, knowing what I do about these forum's, I hoped to get some worthwhile advice from those in the know.

You know, like what's the best amp/speaker/cable/transport .. yada yada yada.


Looks like Mitsui according to - http://www.amazon.com/gp/richpub/syltguides/fullview/Q0DSVI8GU0T2



edit : now here comes the upgrade bug - time for a Plextor?

Here we go again...




.

haunyack
2007-03-15, 12:03
I haven't gotten errors burning discs since the days of buffer underruns, but perhaps I don't burn enough of them. It has been suggested here that standalone cd burners create better sounding copies, but I'm not sure if the brand/dye color matters, or if that's even factual.

Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs makes gold CD-r blanks, as does Kodak and some other less recognizable brands.

My question is, are they archival only because of the properties of the dye in CD-r, and likely not to sound any better than other color dyes (black comes to mind..)?

It seems pressed CDs use the gold in a different way, and I don't think the gold makes them sound better (as opposed to mastering), but I could be wrong.

Skunk,

I wonder if there are CD burning pucks available to lay on top of my box-o-wires while I burn.

mmm...I'd love to be able to burn with crisper bottom-end, thicker midrange and ....

Sorry...got sidetracked again.

;-)


.

amcluesent
2007-03-15, 12:06
Links to the other forums discussing making coasters would probably get modded off as supporting the competition, but I've found Verbatim disks with the Pioneer drives (111-d) consistently reliable.

haunyack
2007-03-15, 12:07
Links to the other forums discussing making coasters would probably get modded off as supporting the competition, but I've found Verbatim disks with the Pioneer drives (111-d) consistently reliable.


The Verbatim are certainly more reasonably priced than the Mitsui.


.

Steven Moore
2007-03-15, 12:56
Here is an interesting web site, although it concentrates on dvdr's there are some interesting articles on burning and disk quality that may help.

http://www.digitalfaq.com/media/index.htm

cliveb
2007-03-15, 12:56
Thanks for the info.
I burn my CD's at X8 w/Nero (lowest setting available) or X1 with EAC.
Very few CDRs are spec'd for burning at 1x these days: most use dye formulations that expect a minimum write speed of about 4x. (The only CDRs that you should expect to work reliably at 1x are the ones specifically made for audio CD recorders, since they must work in real time when recording analogue sources).


This stack of TDK's just got me wondering if I could do better without all the coasters that have cropped up around the house lately.
TDK is a well regarded brand name, but they might be sourcing their CDRs from wherever they get a good deal. You'd be better off choosing a brand that is manufactured in a known place. Mitsui Gold are liked by a lot of people, but they are expensive. I see Verbatim also mentioned in this thread, but they can be from a variety of sources. Verbatims that are made in Singapore come from the genuine Mitsubishi factory, but others might be sourced from Taiwan, India, or other places, and may not be so reliable.

FWIW, I always buy Taiyo Yuden, which are made in Japan. Never had a coaster with them. The only possible problem with Taiyo Yuden is that there are a few counterfeits around, so you need to buy from a reputable supplier. Also, you won't normally find them in shops, so you usually have to buy them online.

niuphan
2007-03-15, 21:20
I agree! Don't pay attention to the company on the label!

It's all about where the discs are made/manufactured!

General rule of thumb... made in Japan = Good disc! made in taiwan = not so good disc!

It's been a while since I purchased CD's but Fuji is the only CDR I have been able to find in local stores that were made in Japan. Always look at the side label. Don't be scared because 90+% you find will be made in Taiwan. If you can't find Japan made discs in the stores, buy Taiyo Yuden or Mitsui discs online.

Kevin O. Lepard
2007-03-15, 21:23
>FWIW, I always buy Taiyo Yuden

The other one I see frequently mentioned as very high grade are
Mitsui, which use a gold-based dye and is my disk of choice for
archiving to CD. (That's not a knock on Taiyo Yuden). Not your
cheapie CD-R, though. I've never lost data with one, though

http://www.mam-a.com/

Kevin
--
Kevin O. Lepard

Happiness is being 100% Microsoft free.

jpj
2007-03-16, 19:06
I always had good luck with TDK until my last stack, which had maybe a 30% failure rate until I dropped my record speed from 52X to 32X. (Using my pride-and-joy Plextor Premium, arguably the best consumer CD-R drive ever produced. Unfortunately long out of production.)

Most recently, I picked up several spindles of Memorex 52X blanks on sale at Best Buy and these are burning flawlessly at full speed. Typical scenario is using "burnatonce" to create CD-DA from my FLAC archives. This after finding several cases where "burrrn" choked.

Yes, I know Taiyo Yudan, Mitsui and Verbatim are often cited among the best, but as long as I get perfect results for around 12 cents per disc, the difference becomes too academic for me. ;-)